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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Senate has approved legislation to protect as wilderness nearly 55,000 acres of land around the Big Sur coast and in Pinnacles National Monument. "This development is an important first step in our effort to protect the most important and endangered wild areas in California," said Sen. Barbara Boxer, a California Democrat. The House passed the measure last week. It goes to the White House, where President Bush is expected to sign it. The largest collection of new wilderness would be 34,840 acres in the Ventana Wilderness area of Los Padres National Forest.
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BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Senate has approved legislation to protect as wilderness nearly 55,000 acres of land around the Big Sur coast and in Pinnacles National Monument. "This development is an important first step in our effort to protect the most important and endangered wild areas in California," said Sen. Barbara Boxer, a California Democrat. The House passed the measure last week. It goes to the White House, where President Bush is expected to sign it. The largest collection of new wilderness would be 34,840 acres in the Ventana Wilderness area of Los Padres National Forest.
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By Carole Rafferty and Carole Rafferty,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 19, 1992
BIG SUR, Calif. -- Not all the rich and famous are searching for a Pebble Beach property and the golfing, clubby lifestyle. In Southern California, more and more Hollywood folks are looking to Big Sur as an idyllic getaway within striking distance of Los Angeles."
TRAVEL
October 27, 2002
Three years ago, the idea of paying $50 or $100 to ship a bag to your destination seemed like a luxury for the rich. "People thought we were way ahead of the curve," says Richard Altomare, who founded such a shipping service in 1999 after he popped a shoulder hoisting a bag. At first, his service was not widely used, but since the Sept. 11 attacks, as security-related luggage hassles have grown, so has Altomare's business. He heads Universal Express Inc. in Boca Raton, Fla., which runs Luggage Express (866-744-7224, www.usxpluggageexpress .com)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 1998
BIG SUR, Calif. -- On the sun-drenched patio of Nepenthe's, tourists are sipping lemonade and admiring the ocean view for the first time in nearly four months.At the Ventana Inn, Mercedes-Benzes and BMWs are once again pulling into the parking lot, and guests are lounging on the clothing-optional sun deck. At the Big Sur Lodge, the phone is ringing nonstop with reservations.A whole season after winter storms felled redwoods, gouged out hundreds of feet of scenic state Route 1 and forced helicopter evacuations of visitors and residents, Big Sur is coming back to life.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Special to The Sun | August 7, 1994
Our hikes are a little different," warned Steve Harper, a naturalist who was leading a wilderness trek out of the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, Calif.How different could they be? You put on boots, you huff up hills and through muck. You ooh and ahh and kvetch . . ."We bow to the trees."Now wait just a minute."What if I can't find a tree I respect?" I joked, but nobody laughed.Nature is serious business here.Whether you're trekking along forested ridges and bonding with the vegetation, cantering across one of the wild beaches on horseback or simply gazing out on the Pacific from a cushy cliff-top resort, nature is the star attraction throughout this 90-mile expanse of coastal highlands that stretches roughly from San Simeon, 260 miles north of Los Angeles, to Carmel, 130 miles south of San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 1996
The road clings to the side of the ragged coastline, twisting around sharp pinnacles of rock, bridging deep chasms, climbing to narrow turnouts high above the crashing surf.Driving on the Big Sur Highway in California is a trip in its most evocative sense, but the description above could as easily fit the Amalfi Drive in Italy or the Cape of Good Hope Road in South Africa. Great ocean drives exist all over the world.The common denominator: These roads offer an exceptional panorama.Great Ocean Road"I had seldom seen a more fearful section of coastline," said explorer Matthew Flinders when he first caught sight of Australia's Shipwreck Coast.
TRAVEL
October 27, 2002
Three years ago, the idea of paying $50 or $100 to ship a bag to your destination seemed like a luxury for the rich. "People thought we were way ahead of the curve," says Richard Altomare, who founded such a shipping service in 1999 after he popped a shoulder hoisting a bag. At first, his service was not widely used, but since the Sept. 11 attacks, as security-related luggage hassles have grown, so has Altomare's business. He heads Universal Express Inc. in Boca Raton, Fla., which runs Luggage Express (866-744-7224, www.usxpluggageexpress .com)
FEATURES
By Richard Scheinin and Richard Scheinin,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1992
Nearly 20 years ago, Alan Lakein published these words: "Time is life. It is irreversible and irreplaceable. To waste your time is to waste your life, but to master your time is to master your life and make the most of it."Those were the opening sentences to his book "How To Get Control of Your Time and Your Life," which went on to sell over 3 million copies. It made Mr. Lakein the guru of time management, a much sought-after corporate consultant and adviser to busy celebrities like Gloria Steinem and Neil Diamond.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 27, 1991
Of the three exhibits inaugurating the enlarged Academy of the Arts in Easton, "Herman Maril Seascapes" (through March 2) occupies the premier place in the academy's two main galleries and is clearly the most successful, because of Maril's art.The artist's combinations of abstract design, beautiful color and almost palpable atmosphere seem ever more timeless as time goes on. These works, covering more than half a century from the 1932 "Early Harbor Scene"...
BUSINESS
By Michael McCabe and Michael McCabe,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | August 11, 2002
SAN FRANCISCO - A 9,898-acre tract of rough and primitive Big Sur land, studded with oak and redwood and lying in the center of an area ringed by public open spaces, has been acquired for $37 million by conservation groups from cellular phone pioneer Craig McCaw, conservation officials have reported. In a year or so, when the Palo Corona Ranch, as the area is called, is open to the public, miles of hiking trails and other paths meandering through the property will connect 13 parks and open spaces from Carmel to Big Sur and beyond, effectively doubling the size of these sprawling parklands overlooking the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 1998
BIG SUR, Calif. -- On the sun-drenched patio of Nepenthe's, tourists are sipping lemonade and admiring the ocean view for the first time in nearly four months.At the Ventana Inn, Mercedes-Benzes and BMWs are once again pulling into the parking lot, and guests are lounging on the clothing-optional sun deck. At the Big Sur Lodge, the phone is ringing nonstop with reservations.A whole season after winter storms felled redwoods, gouged out hundreds of feet of scenic state Route 1 and forced helicopter evacuations of visitors and residents, Big Sur is coming back to life.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 1996
The road clings to the side of the ragged coastline, twisting around sharp pinnacles of rock, bridging deep chasms, climbing to narrow turnouts high above the crashing surf.Driving on the Big Sur Highway in California is a trip in its most evocative sense, but the description above could as easily fit the Amalfi Drive in Italy or the Cape of Good Hope Road in South Africa. Great ocean drives exist all over the world.The common denominator: These roads offer an exceptional panorama.Great Ocean Road"I had seldom seen a more fearful section of coastline," said explorer Matthew Flinders when he first caught sight of Australia's Shipwreck Coast.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1995
Jack Kerouac helped create a literary myth and a persona, but by the end of his life, he was rejecting both. When he died in 1969, at the age of 47, he had been living quietly for more than a decade, his years of free-wheeling escapades "on the road" long behind him. And he was weary of talking about the Beat Generation, the term he had coined two decades before.Destroying a myth, however, may be more difficult than creating it. As these two volumes reaffirm, there's still something alluring about the image of writer as free spirit, the restless seeker of truth.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Special to The Sun | August 7, 1994
Our hikes are a little different," warned Steve Harper, a naturalist who was leading a wilderness trek out of the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, Calif.How different could they be? You put on boots, you huff up hills and through muck. You ooh and ahh and kvetch . . ."We bow to the trees."Now wait just a minute."What if I can't find a tree I respect?" I joked, but nobody laughed.Nature is serious business here.Whether you're trekking along forested ridges and bonding with the vegetation, cantering across one of the wild beaches on horseback or simply gazing out on the Pacific from a cushy cliff-top resort, nature is the star attraction throughout this 90-mile expanse of coastal highlands that stretches roughly from San Simeon, 260 miles north of Los Angeles, to Carmel, 130 miles south of San Francisco.
NEWS
By John F. Kelly | January 17, 1994
WHEN THE GOING GETS WEIRD: THE TWISTED LIFE AN TIMES OF HUNTER S. THOMPSON. By Peter Whitmer. Hyperion. 335 pages. $21.95.DO WE really need another "very unauthorized biography" of outlaw journalist Hunter S. Thompson? There's been a spate of them recently -- this is the second in 1993, the other being Paul Perry's "Fear and Loathing" -- and the question is, why? Are the authors chronicling an era using one of its pivotal stars?Or defining a writer's influence on the journalism of the last three decades?
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1995
Jack Kerouac helped create a literary myth and a persona, but by the end of his life, he was rejecting both. When he died in 1969, at the age of 47, he had been living quietly for more than a decade, his years of free-wheeling escapades "on the road" long behind him. And he was weary of talking about the Beat Generation, the term he had coined two decades before.Destroying a myth, however, may be more difficult than creating it. As these two volumes reaffirm, there's still something alluring about the image of writer as free spirit, the restless seeker of truth.
FEATURES
By Caroline Spencer and Caroline Spencer,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1992
This is the California that men dreamed of years ago, this is the Pacific that Balboa looked out on from the Peak of Darien, this is the face of the earth as the Creator intended it to look.Henry Miller"Big Sur and the Orange of Hieronymous Bosch" Arugged, raw wilderness perched on rocky cliffs ringing an untamed Pacific Ocean, California's Central Coast for years has served as a haven for artists, writers and scientists. It has inspired accomplished Americans such as newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, author Henry Miller and two-time Nobel Peace Prize recipient Dr. Linus Pauling.
FEATURES
By Caroline Spencer and Caroline Spencer,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1992
This is the California that men dreamed of years ago, this is the Pacific that Balboa looked out on from the Peak of Darien, this is the face of the earth as the Creator intended it to look.Henry Miller"Big Sur and the Orange of Hieronymous Bosch" Arugged, raw wilderness perched on rocky cliffs ringing an untamed Pacific Ocean, California's Central Coast for years has served as a haven for artists, writers and scientists. It has inspired accomplished Americans such as newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, author Henry Miller and two-time Nobel Peace Prize recipient Dr. Linus Pauling.
FEATURES
By Richard Scheinin and Richard Scheinin,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1992
Nearly 20 years ago, Alan Lakein published these words: "Time is life. It is irreversible and irreplaceable. To waste your time is to waste your life, but to master your time is to master your life and make the most of it."Those were the opening sentences to his book "How To Get Control of Your Time and Your Life," which went on to sell over 3 million copies. It made Mr. Lakein the guru of time management, a much sought-after corporate consultant and adviser to busy celebrities like Gloria Steinem and Neil Diamond.
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