Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBig Steel
IN THE NEWS

Big Steel

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mark Reutter | April 27, 1992
AMERICA'S steelmakers are back in trouble. After shutting down dozens of steel mills since 1979 and throwing 250,000 people out of work, the industry was supposed to be ready for the 1990s. "We're back," a top-ranked executive declared.They're back all right, awash in red ink. Bethlehem Steel, the nation's No. 2 producer, lost a staggering $767 million last year. That's on top of more than $400 million in losses in 1990. In all, the five companies grouped under the once-proud moniker of Big Steel (Inland, National, USX-U.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | January 3, 2009
Who wants to be a bailout recipient? We do! say the steel companies. Not content with what is likely to be the biggest public works program in decades, Big Steel wants to ensure taxpayers buy bridge, road, school and electric-grid steel only or largely from U.S. producers. Every provision in Congress' forthcoming stimulus should contain "a buy America clause," Nucor CEO Daniel R. DiMicco told The New York Times. What a good idea. The Buy America Act of 1933, signed by Herbert Hoover as he exited his miserable presidency, fueled a global trade war that hurt American exports and made the Great Depression even greater.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,Chicago Tribune | December 15, 2006
In a move that cheered automakers but angered domestic steel producers, the U.S. International Trade Commission yesterday eliminated most of its controversial tariffs on carbon-steel imports. The independent federal agency's ruling ends an unusual, high-profile feud between two American smokestack industries battered by global competition, Big Steel and its major customer, the auto industry. The commission's action will lower the price auto companies pay for steel and bring a similar benefit to other major steel buyers, such as implement makers Caterpillar Inc. and Deere & Co. Those same lower steel prices promise to pressure profits at many American steel producers.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,Chicago Tribune | December 15, 2006
In a move that cheered automakers but angered domestic steel producers, the U.S. International Trade Commission yesterday eliminated most of its controversial tariffs on carbon-steel imports. The independent federal agency's ruling ends an unusual, high-profile feud between two American smokestack industries battered by global competition, Big Steel and its major customer, the auto industry. The commission's action will lower the price auto companies pay for steel and bring a similar benefit to other major steel buyers, such as implement makers Caterpillar Inc. and Deere & Co. Those same lower steel prices promise to pressure profits at many American steel producers.
NEWS
December 16, 2001
CONSOLIDATION of big steel companies may be inevitable for their survival. It may also be in the national interest to encourage the merger of several money-losing companies, such as Bethlehem Steel, and promote greater efficiencies in this basic industry. But it is exceptionally bad policy for the federal government to assume the costs of the retiree health benefits of these firms to aid that consolidation. It would create a dangerous precedent and ongoing obligation for taxpayers while rewarding improvident decisions of bad management.
NEWS
By Mark Reutter | April 28, 1992
THE CORNFIELDS of central Indiana might seem an unlikely place for a steel mill, but then the gleaming oblong buildings rising near rural Crawfordsville don't look much like a steel mill, either.But a steel mill this is, and one that has revolutionized production. The plant takes scrap iron and, in one continuous movement, melts, casts, flattens and rolls the metal into coils of steel ready for shipment. Known as thin-slab casting, the process slices the time needed to turn raw materials into the steel used in making auto parts and appliances from seven days to under two hours.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Now that Big Steel has foreign imports on the run with successful trade litigation, it doesn't want the government to mess it up by making a deal with other countries."
NEWS
By Mark Reutter | April 29, 1992
GENEVA STEEL was considered a "loser" when it was cast off by USX, the nation's largest steelmaker, to a group of Utah businessmen in 1987. Equipment was decrepit, customers unhappy, employees openly rebellious.Today the plant near Salt Lake City is not so easily dismissed. Geneva was one of two integrated steel companies to report a profit in 1991 and has won praise from buyers and suppliers alike. What's more, with 2,800 well-paid, unionized workers and $400 million a year generated by local purchases and secondary employment, the plant contributes to a balanced Utah economy.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The days when ocean liners, tankers and ships for the Navy's fleets were built in Baltimore died out some years ago.Down on Curtis Bay, though, the Coast Guard Yard has plugged along quietly.Like survivors of another industry -- Big Steel -- that lost out to overseas competitors, the yard found safety in its niche, thinking small.Yesterday the yard was the scene of an old-fashioned boat launching complete with band, white doves and a smashed champagne bottle, all to celebrate the first of a new class of buoy tender that will be built there over the next three years.
NEWS
August 13, 1993
Joe McGinniss wrote an entire book based on conversations he imagined with Sen. Ted Kennedy. The least we should be able to do is write an editorial based on our conversation with rhinoceros Daisey Mae over at the Baltimore Zoo:Us: What do you think about "Rhinos" as the possible name for a Baltimore professional football team?Daisey: Pass me a clump of that meadow grass, will ya?Us: Uh, sure. What about the name?Daisey: Actually, I'm a little insulted.Us: Insulted?Daisey: Yes. You've got 100-plus major league sports teams in America and none has ever adopted the heroic, powerful but non-predatory, image of the rhino.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
If International Steel Group Inc. acquires Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s mills, the company would become a major domestic producer with access to new and potentially lucrative markets. It would also become a model for a leaner, lower-cost U.S. industry that faces competition from larger foreign rivals. Cleveland-based ISG would roughly double in size and gain significant steelmaking capacity for the automobile, construction and appliance markets in buying Bethlehem's crown jewels - its plants at Sparrows Point in Baltimore County and Burns Harbor, Ind. - as well as smaller operations in Pennsylvania and New York.
NEWS
By Jason Shultz | March 11, 2002
CAN YOU hear that sound? It is the sound of the U.S. steel industry melting into obscurity. In a largely political move, President Bush took the easy way out Wednesday by imposing limited tariffs ranging from 8 percent to 30 percent, but exempted America's two largest trading partners, Canada and Mexico. He didn't go far enough. What would you do if you lost your pension and health care in retirement? Would you go back into the work force? Do you have the skills to start a new career at 65?
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | January 28, 2002
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - The Bush administration asked the U.S. International Trade Commission in June for a finding that steel imports harm the domestic industry. Although the worst of the import bulge had passed, continuing financial difficulties at major producers put pressure on the administration to act. Just before Christmas, the ITC dutifully complied. Its proposed "remedies" include tariffs of up to 40 percent and discriminatory country-by-country quotas. Mr. Bush is in the uncomfortable position of having gotten exactly what he wanted.
NEWS
December 16, 2001
CONSOLIDATION of big steel companies may be inevitable for their survival. It may also be in the national interest to encourage the merger of several money-losing companies, such as Bethlehem Steel, and promote greater efficiencies in this basic industry. But it is exceptionally bad policy for the federal government to assume the costs of the retiree health benefits of these firms to aid that consolidation. It would create a dangerous precedent and ongoing obligation for taxpayers while rewarding improvident decisions of bad management.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1999
If good fences make good neighbors, then what do big garages make?It's a riddle several Baltimore County families have grappled with in recent months as they have watched sturdy, imposing steel-sided buildings rise a few yards from their homes.The answer is difficult."It's been a dream to live on the water," said Dave Stiller, a steel worker who owns 2 picturesque acres along Hawk's Cove in the far eastern reaches of the county. "To have someone come and destroy it with a commercial-type building in a setting that's rural, it's a shame."
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1999
Unionized steel workers at Bethlehem Steel Corp. and the U.S. Steel Division of USX Corp. are being asked to forsake the high raises they traditionally get in return for better pension benefits, according to a tentative contract proposal obtained by The Sun.The proposed five-year deal would cover 10,000 Bethlehem workers, including about 3,800 at the company's Sparrows Point Division in Baltimore, and roughly 15,000 U.S. Steel workers. All are members of the United Steelworkers of America.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1999
Unionized steel workers at Bethlehem Steel Corp. and the U.S. Steel Division of USX Corp. are being asked to forsake the high raises they traditionally get in return for better pension benefits, according to a tentative contract proposal obtained by The Sun.The proposed five-year deal would cover 10,000 Bethlehem workers, including about 3,800 at the company's Sparrows Point Division in Baltimore, and roughly 15,000 U.S. Steel workers. All are members of the United Steelworkers of America.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1998
Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point Division has seen production fall and could face layoffs if the flood of cheap imported steel isn't stemmed, company Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Curtis H. Barnette said yesterday."
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1999
Though Big Steel has waged an aggressive fight over the imported steel it says stands at the core of its current woes, the situation is much more complex than it appears on its face. And the steel spat could easily end up in this country as a referendum on free trade, industry analysts and other economics experts say."Is there a problem in the steel industry right now? Certainly," said steel analyst Charles A. Bradford, head of Bradford Research in New York City. "Is foreign steel a part of it?
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1998
Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point Division has seen production fall and could face layoffs if the flood of cheap imported steel isn't stemmed, company Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Curtis H. Barnette said yesterday."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.