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September 26, 2005
"We don't have as much respect for our fellow man as we used to have, [and players] don't have as much respect for the game of baseball as we used to." Joe Morgan Baseball Hall of Famer "Matt [Leinart] wasn't the big star. Reggie [Bush] wasn't the big star. This was one where the entire team wins." Pete Carroll Southern California coach, on the Trojans' win over Oregon on Saturday "We need to win every game." Jason Michaels Philadelphia Phillies outfielder, on the tight National League wild-card race
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
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FEATURES
By Gene Seymour | September 28, 2007
Why isn't Dwayne Johnson a big star by now? The camera loves him. He's funny, self-deprecating and takes the occasional quirky chance with an off-the-mainstream-reservation experiment like the someday-to-be-released Southland Tales. Maybe having to carry around "The Rock" as an alias or alter ego - or whatever it's supposed to be - weighs down his upward mobility. Maybe he's not stoic enough to be an action guy or too brawny to be taken seriously as a comic actor. It could be that he hasn't quite found the right vehicle to drive home his persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
Taiye Selasi's debut novel has been in publication for less than a week. But even before a single copy was sold, the glamorous 33-year-old was being hailed as the newest star of the literary world. Selasi's publisher, The Penguin Group, is promoting "Ghana Must Go" big-time. Penguin describes the family saga as "one of the most eagerly anticipated debut novels of the year. " Because of her book's multicultural tapestry, Selasi has been compared to such literary It Girls as Zadie Smith and Jhumpa Lahiri.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 1998
Seeing a big star like Alanis Morissette playing a tiny club is a fan's dream come true.Seeing a big star like Alanis Morissette playing a tiny club when you don't know most of the songs is a little less than dreamy, and that was the situation facing some 500 fans at Washington's 9: 30 Club on Tuesday.Wearing a red satin dress under a sheer, black T-shirt with a scene from Chinese mythology embroidered across the chest, Morissette took the stage to tumultuous applause.But as her band muscled through the dark, semi-industrial pulse of "Baba," the crowd's enthusiasm melted into a mixture of curiosity and confused excitement.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
RACE 1 ANALYSIS Hesa Big Star (4) is one of two Howard Wolfendale trainees in the mix with a good shot to prevail. This gelding has speed, always tries and is going a furlong shorter after faltering late last time. He has plenty of competition from fellow Wolfendale charge Roth Ticket (9), Wise Diplomat (1) and Sure You Can (3). SUN LONG SHOT Bettin On M J (7) has flashed a lot of speed at Charles Town and is coming off a strong effort in allowance company. He can close if necessary.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
The big blue tour bus roars up to the entrance of Golden Ring Mall and there's Ed McMahon in front, waving as if he's running for Congress. Cameras click. Felt-tip pens are readied for autographs. TV news crews scurry into position. The most famous TV sidekick in history steps onto the parking lot and flashes that dazzling, million-dollar smile, and for a brief moment this tired strip of eastern Baltimore County seems transformed into a slice of Beverly Hills. "How you doing?!" McMahon yells to the crowd of about three dozen there to greet him. Then he launches into a flurry of genial glad-handing and interview-giving.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | November 7, 2007
I WANT ONE!" That's Nicollette Sheridan, the blond bombshell of Desperate Housewives. What does this beauty want? Not a handsome, talented man - she already has that in the fine form of singer Michael Bolton. Not success - she's had that since she sexed up the old cul-de-sac on Knots Landing. What Nic says she yearns for is a baby. The star revealed this while chatting with ubiquitous writer and show biz historian Hal Lifson in the lobby of the Beverly Hills Hotel. She was a knockout in sweats, no makeup and seemed so down to earth that Lifson pulled out pictures of his own child, Sofia.
FEATURES
By PATRICK A. MCGUIRE | November 22, 1992
After a while it becomes an impossible blur: the heavy E string caught between his thumb and forefinger, stretched taut, snapped sharply back against the frets. Quickly now, the heel of his right hand thumps down once, twice onto the bridge of his big Taylor 510 guitar. The overall effect is a hollow whap-boom-boom that he repeats again and again -- a steady stream of 16th notes, a staccato 1-2-3 rhythm, with the 4th note missing -- the pattern perfectly offsetting the accent of the song so that it pulses like a churning helicopter rotor, an African drum beat, an aching heart about to break in two.He does all of this, Pete Kennedy, while standing on top of the bar in the Top Side restaurant in Galesville, a normally quiet burg on the West River, just below Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
When Jacksonville Jaguars coach Tom Coughlin was trying to decide whether to make Tony Boselli the first draft pick in the history of the franchise in 1995, he took him to dinner and spent hours probing his background and personality.Coughlin came away liking what he heard."The key for me was the maturity he had that was beyond his years; the poise, the attitude. Tony brought a lot to the table," he said.His fiancee, Angi, who's now his wife, also enjoyed the interview, because she found out things about Boselli she hadn't known.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Joe Flacco and Dennis Pitta emerged from the tunnel at mostly empty Paul Brown Stadium about three hours before kickoff last Sunday and began what has become a game-day ritual. They warmed up with some casual throwing and running. They then moved to one end of the field, settling about eight yards apart with Flacco in the middle and Pitta flanked to his right. After the pair made eye contact, Pitta burst out of his stance and into a sprint, suddenly stopping and cutting toward the sidelines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Common kept his cool last week — and his artistic faith. While controversy swirled around his appearance at the White House for a poetry reading, the rapper-actor was anchoring a movie in Baltimore that should quiet even those pundits who tried to paint him as a gangsta. With concentration and intensity, he was helping first-time writer-director Sheldon Candis and a superb ensemble flesh out a script that proves (among other things) that gangsterism doesn't pay. "LUV" — it stands for "Learning Uncle Vincent" — captures the turning point in the life of an 11-year-old boy named Woody (Michael Rainey Jr)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Idris Elba has presence. It wasn't just his handsome glare that collected a following of "Stringabellas" for his role of Stringer Bell on HBO's "The Wire." It was his young-Sean-Connery manliness and dry-ice street smarts. Even if you'd never seen "The Wire," you could tell Elba had a major star's aura from his opposite performances in two wildly different big-screen hits, "This Christmas" and " Obsessed." In "This Christmas," he was superbly, sometimes hilariously confrontational as a reckless jazz saxophonist; you could sense Elba's relief at letting loose after years of Stringer Bell's emotional deep freeze.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | March 19, 2009
Star power, cultural diversity and the circus - a brief summation of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2009-2010 season. The presence of several big-name guests on the lineup may well get the most attention as subscribers digest the material, released Tuesday. "I think we've done well," says music director Marin Alsop. "The trick was to figure out how to maintain reasonable ticket prices and bump up the level of artists we feature." Those artists include such longtime luminaries as sopranos Jessye Norman and Kathleen Battle (in separate concerts)
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | January 16, 2008
THE GOLDEN GLOBES didn't happen, for all intents and purposes - it was a news conference, for heaven's sake! But other events benefited from the lack of glitz at the Beverly Hilton. Over at the legendary Beverly Hills Hotel, the annual Diamond Information Center/InStyle luncheon attracted the likes of Sharon Stone in a skin-tight leopard print Cavalli cocktail dress and matching sky-high heels. This outfit did not say, "I'm just here to browse and have a bit of sushi, pay me no mind." Debra Messing was way over the top in a chic black satin party gown and a Stella McCartney bow-shaped diamond ring.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | November 7, 2007
I WANT ONE!" That's Nicollette Sheridan, the blond bombshell of Desperate Housewives. What does this beauty want? Not a handsome, talented man - she already has that in the fine form of singer Michael Bolton. Not success - she's had that since she sexed up the old cul-de-sac on Knots Landing. What Nic says she yearns for is a baby. The star revealed this while chatting with ubiquitous writer and show biz historian Hal Lifson in the lobby of the Beverly Hills Hotel. She was a knockout in sweats, no makeup and seemed so down to earth that Lifson pulled out pictures of his own child, Sofia.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN Hunter and STEPHEN Hunter,Film Critic | September 20, 1992
Studio chiefs have come and gone in Hollywood history, some of them trailing slime and some of them gentlemen of the old school. But Sherry Lansing, the first of their number not to be of their gender, did something no one, before or since, had ever thought of, and it stunned a town where rumors insist that writers' skeletal remains have been discovered clutching dusty, silent telephones. Sherry Lansing called people . . . back.Now, some seven or eight years removed from her hectic and sometimes controversial reign as head of Twentieth Century Fox, Lansing can laugh about it."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 23, 1994
The best way to be entertained by TV tonight -- after watching "TV Nation" that is -- is to sample several cable movies to catch early roles by actors and actresses who today are a lot more in demand. Tonight's exhibits: Tommy Lee Jones, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Fran Drescher.* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., Channel 4) -- It's almost better not knowing what's on this show, because the variety is a constant and pleasant surprise. Suffice it to say that Michael Moore, Merrill Markoe and Ben Hamper are on the road and on the case.
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour | September 28, 2007
Why isn't Dwayne Johnson a big star by now? The camera loves him. He's funny, self-deprecating and takes the occasional quirky chance with an off-the-mainstream-reservation experiment like the someday-to-be-released Southland Tales. Maybe having to carry around "The Rock" as an alias or alter ego - or whatever it's supposed to be - weighs down his upward mobility. Maybe he's not stoic enough to be an action guy or too brawny to be taken seriously as a comic actor. It could be that he hasn't quite found the right vehicle to drive home his persona.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | September 7, 2007
For real movie lovers, fall is the season of our greatest content. It's when the Oscar contenders start making themselves known, when the big-name directors get their names up on the marquee, when the potential blockbusters promising both popularity and prestige start to open amid great rejoicing. Except ... maybe not so much this year. With fall 2007 just around the corner, no one film is dominating the movie-going discussion. The big-name directors - the Spielbergs, Scorseses, Eastwoods, Jacksons - are taking a breather, gearing up for big-time releases in 2008 and later.
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