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Big River

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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | July 30, 1993
The last of Theatre on the Hill's main summer productions, "Big River" is a William Hauptman adaptation of Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." The musical, which opens tonight, includes 14 original songs by the late country music figure Roger Miller.Besides the 18 human actors, many playing double and even triple parts, the play introduces Mistersippi, a young black and white Hampshire pig, in his stage debut."The pig is actually the star of the show," producer Ira Domser said jokingly.
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FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 28, 2006
Producing Shenandoah at Ford's Theatre in Washington sounded like a good idea for several reasons. The show is set during the Civil War, and Ford's is a major landmark of that era. In addition, when this 1975 anti-war musical debuted, the country was still reeling from Vietnam; three decades later, the nation is at loggerheads over our involvement in another foreign conflict. Finally, this revival is directed by Jeff Calhoun, whose Deaf West production of Big River - set just before the Civil War - was one of the finest shows this critic has ever seen at Ford's.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
When Michael McElroy auditioned for the role of Jim in Deaf West Theatre's production of Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, he thought he'd be using American Sign Language only during the songs. He soon realized he would be signing -- as well as reciting -- his many lines. At that point, McElroy, who had never before used sign language, began to panic. For the next week, he entered "sign boot camp," spending at least three hours a day with an interpreter to learn the signs for every word in the script.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 7, 2005
A musical performed by a combination of hearing and deaf actors. The prospect sounds unwieldy, at the very least. But it's difficult to imagine a revival of Roger Miller and William Hauptman's Big River that flows more gracefully or resonates more meaningfully than the one co-produced by Deaf West Theatre at Ford's Theatre in Washington. Not only does director/choreographer Jeff Calhoun's staging of this 1985 Huckleberry Finn musical succeed on multiple levels - visually, aurally, literally, metaphorically - but it is one of those rare and wonderful examples of a show that does what it is about.
NEWS
By Chantal Hall and Chantal Hall,LONG REACH HIGH SCHOOL | March 11, 2005
One of the most famous characters in American literature is Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn. Daring and mischievous, Huck is the archetype of an incorrigible boy. His many exciting adventures and episodes of trouble are chronicled in the 1985 Tony-winning musical Big River. The story begins in St. Petersburg, Mo., and unfolds along the Mississippi River. Huck escapes his crazed, alcoholic father and stumbles upon Jim, a runaway slave. Together, they venture down the river in search of freedom.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 28, 2006
Producing Shenandoah at Ford's Theatre in Washington sounded like a good idea for several reasons. The show is set during the Civil War, and Ford's is a major landmark of that era. In addition, when this 1975 anti-war musical debuted, the country was still reeling from Vietnam; three decades later, the nation is at loggerheads over our involvement in another foreign conflict. Finally, this revival is directed by Jeff Calhoun, whose Deaf West production of Big River - set just before the Civil War - was one of the finest shows this critic has ever seen at Ford's.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | February 2, 1995
In "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Mark Twain called the Mississippi River "a monstrous big river." From that phrase comes the title of the musical version of Huck Finn, "Big River."The drama department of Glenelg High School will present "Big River" Feb. 22, 24, 25 and 26 in the school auditorium. This production, directed by Ron Oaks, retells the story of Huck Finn, who is played by Jeb Stuart Johnston, and Jim, played by Jamie Hill.The play is a story about Huck's efforts to help Jim, a runaway slave, escape down the river.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
With powerful resonance and a beguiling smile, Alton McClain Scarborough promises to make audiences fall for "The Leader of the Pack."The recording artist, who has a Top-40 hit to her credit, plays Darlene Love in the musical that is awash in the sounds of the '60s."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 1999
As a new entry on the roster of successful Broadway shows currently making the rounds on the dinner theater circuit, "Big River" isn't especially well known. It's a musical version of Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn," so you know right off that unforgettable characters like Huck, Tom Sawyer, Jim the runaway slave, and drunken old Pap will be waiting for you on stage. The breezy, countrified score was composed by Roger Miller, the "King of the Road" from the '60s. "Big River" is a tuneful, heartwarming show eminently worth seeing when the characterizations are up to snuff, which they are at the Chesapeake Music Hall where Huck, Jim and their raft can be seen floating down the Mississippi through May 25. This is a tough show to bring off, with its thorny scene changes and an all-important river ambience to create.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 2000
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - After years of cleaning up the garbage and pollution that gave the Hudson River a bad name, New York State officials are now trying to bring back public beaches and swimming areas along its shores. The Department of Environmental Conservation and the State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation have begun a two-year study to develop state-operated public swimming beaches along the Hudson from Manhattan to Columbia County, just south of Albany. The $88,000 study is part of Gov. George Pataki's 1996 initiative, the Hudson River Estuary Action Plan, to protect the river.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
When Michael McElroy auditioned for the role of Jim in Deaf West Theatre's production of Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, he thought he'd be using American Sign Language only during the songs. He soon realized he would be signing -- as well as reciting -- his many lines. At that point, McElroy, who had never before used sign language, began to panic. For the next week, he entered "sign boot camp," spending at least three hours a day with an interpreter to learn the signs for every word in the script.
NEWS
By Chantal Hall and Chantal Hall,LONG REACH HIGH SCHOOL | March 11, 2005
One of the most famous characters in American literature is Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn. Daring and mischievous, Huck is the archetype of an incorrigible boy. His many exciting adventures and episodes of trouble are chronicled in the 1985 Tony-winning musical Big River. The story begins in St. Petersburg, Mo., and unfolds along the Mississippi River. Huck escapes his crazed, alcoholic father and stumbles upon Jim, a runaway slave. Together, they venture down the river in search of freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | September 14, 2003
British playwright Helen Edmundson is equal parts chemist, historian, literary sleuth and trapeze artist. All these talents are needed to adapt for the stage such epic novels as Tolstoy's War and Peace and George Eliot's The Mill on the Floss. The latter was seen in an acclaimed production at the Kennedy Center in 2001. Now, Edmundson's staging of Anna Karenina, which has been performed worldwide, runs through Sept. 21 at the Olney Theatre Center. These adaptations showcase Edmundson's ability to craft an imaginative visual language that expresses the spirit of these mammoth - and seemingly unstageable - novels.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2001
Kevin Steenberge, River Hill's 6-foot-10 junior center, is so tall and has such long arms, watching him stand in the key is like seeing a California Redwood in a forest of pine trees. But now that his offensive skills have begun to mesh with his body, it's about the only thing wooden about Steenberge anymore. Steenberge's 15 points, 24 rebounds and six blocks helped the Hawks hold off a scrappy Atholton squad, 54-38, last night, giving River Hill its fourth win in a row and pushing its record to 6-3. And the Hawks did it on the shoulders of their big guy. "I spent all summer working on my offense," Steenberge said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 2000
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - After years of cleaning up the garbage and pollution that gave the Hudson River a bad name, New York State officials are now trying to bring back public beaches and swimming areas along its shores. The Department of Environmental Conservation and the State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation have begun a two-year study to develop state-operated public swimming beaches along the Hudson from Manhattan to Columbia County, just south of Albany. The $88,000 study is part of Gov. George Pataki's 1996 initiative, the Hudson River Estuary Action Plan, to protect the river.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 1999
As a new entry on the roster of successful Broadway shows currently making the rounds on the dinner theater circuit, "Big River" isn't especially well known. It's a musical version of Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn," so you know right off that unforgettable characters like Huck, Tom Sawyer, Jim the runaway slave, and drunken old Pap will be waiting for you on stage. The breezy, countrified score was composed by Roger Miller, the "King of the Road" from the '60s. "Big River" is a tuneful, heartwarming show eminently worth seeing when the characterizations are up to snuff, which they are at the Chesapeake Music Hall where Huck, Jim and their raft can be seen floating down the Mississippi through May 25. This is a tough show to bring off, with its thorny scene changes and an all-important river ambience to create.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 19, 1993
Washington. -- One hundred and thirty Julys ago the president, referring to the Mississippi, said, ''The father of waters again goes unvexed to the sea.'' Lincoln was pleased, the occasion being the triumph of the siege of Vicksburg by a general from the Mississippi River town of Galena, Illinois, U.S. Grant.It would be nice if that willful river -- today 16 miles wide on some Illinois and Missouri plains -- would be more vexed by human ingenuity. But the big river, by riveting our attention on the unpredictable and uncontrollable sphere of life (which is almost all of life)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 7, 2005
A musical performed by a combination of hearing and deaf actors. The prospect sounds unwieldy, at the very least. But it's difficult to imagine a revival of Roger Miller and William Hauptman's Big River that flows more gracefully or resonates more meaningfully than the one co-produced by Deaf West Theatre at Ford's Theatre in Washington. Not only does director/choreographer Jeff Calhoun's staging of this 1985 Huckleberry Finn musical succeed on multiple levels - visually, aurally, literally, metaphorically - but it is one of those rare and wonderful examples of a show that does what it is about.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | February 2, 1995
In "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Mark Twain called the Mississippi River "a monstrous big river." From that phrase comes the title of the musical version of Huck Finn, "Big River."The drama department of Glenelg High School will present "Big River" Feb. 22, 24, 25 and 26 in the school auditorium. This production, directed by Ron Oaks, retells the story of Huck Finn, who is played by Jeb Stuart Johnston, and Jim, played by Jamie Hill.The play is a story about Huck's efforts to help Jim, a runaway slave, escape down the river.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | July 30, 1993
The last of Theatre on the Hill's main summer productions, "Big River" is a William Hauptman adaptation of Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." The musical, which opens tonight, includes 14 original songs by the late country music figure Roger Miller.Besides the 18 human actors, many playing double and even triple parts, the play introduces Mistersippi, a young black and white Hampshire pig, in his stage debut."The pig is actually the star of the show," producer Ira Domser said jokingly.
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