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SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1997
After traveling 14 hours Monday, practicing about three hours since, and then playing with typical on-the-road caution for 83 minutes last night, Ecuador seemed unlikely to win at Memorial Stadium.But a goal off a contested breakaway that began with a long pass from just outside Ecuador's penalty area about seven minutes from the game's end gave Ecuador a 1-0 victory.From coach Steve Sampson to defenders Thomas Dooley, Robin Fraser and Martin Vasquez, the U.S. verdict was "off-side." No doubt, many in the stands saw it the same way. But referee Raul Dominguez of Texas didn't blow his whistle and his nearest assistant on the break, Ellicott City's Rob Fereday, kept his flag down.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 24, 1999
BEN CARSON, the Hopkins pediatric neuro- surgeon who takes his role as role model seriously, preaches the gospel of education, education, education, and doesn't leave a yawn in the room.He's an example of how the will to learn makes all the difference in life. Once the self-described dummy of his class back in Detroit, and not motivated to change that situation, Carson, at his mother's prodding, went on to great things and international celebrity for his accomplishments in the operating room.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,Special to The Sun | March 30, 2007
Jeff Antoniuk stood at the front of the cramped room. With his eyes closed, his hands glided along his tenor saxophone. He wailed and grooved before stepping aside to let the other members of his quartet, the Jazz Update, add their signatures to the song. Steve Olson was one of seven of Antoniuk's students who attended the nighttime gig at 49 West Coffeehouse, Winebar and Gallery. Olson sat near the band, his head and shoulders absently dancing to the tune. The music, he would say later, left him itching to practice his drums.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
The Orioles tried not to make a big deal of Wei-Yin Chen's absence for nearly two months because of a strained oblique. But the Taiwanese lefty has been exceptionally consistent in his year-plus, major league career and not having him take the ball every fifth day has been a challenge - as manager Buck Showalter would say - for the Orioles. Consider that when Chen goes at least seven innings in a start - it happened nine times last year and for the second time this season Wednesday - the Orioles are 11-0.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With only three weeks to go before Congress votes up or down on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor seems weary but determined to pull President Clinton's biggest chestnut out of the fire.Neither the pounding from anti-NAFTA forces led by organized labor preaching it will cost American jobs, nor the aftereffects of a bad fall that has kept him in a large back brace, appears to have daunted the Los Angeles lawyer and Friend of Bill who accepted what is perhaps the toughest remaining challenge on the Clinton first-year agenda.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | April 18, 2007
When junior attackman Mike Leveille arrived at Syracuse in fall 2004, the Orange was coming off of its third NCAA title in the previous five seasons. The school had won eight national championships dating back to 1983, and had been to every tournament final four since then. Little did Leveille know that he was walking into a new era of Syracuse lacrosse - an era during which the Orange has begun to slide into the ranks of the ordinary, an era during which increasing parity in the Division I game is stalking the big boys.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | August 3, 2010
The book on new Orioles manager Buck Showalter is a fairly easy read. He's known as a master of preparation, a student of the game, a micromanager and a guy who can see the big picture and the small picture at the same time. That was on display at his introductory news conference Monday afternoon at Camden Yards. He talked about the Orioles' proud history. He was deferential to outgoing interim manager Juan Samuel. He deftly navigated inquiries about the sensitive, uncharted territory he will inhabit alongside Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail and owner Peter Angelos.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | April 14, 1991
Washington.-- There's a man loose here who says that in a very few years, "the District of Columbia will have the finest elementary school system in the country." He is neither a mental patient nor a politician.No subject on the American agenda produces more pessimism than public schools, and nowhere are the schools regarded more dismally than in the nation's capital. Politicians and educators discuss the situation endlessly. They agree repeatedly that it is entangled with broken homes, drugs and teen-age pregnancy, that the whole thing is an interlocking puzzle and therefore hopeless.
NEWS
July 25, 1995
Not My ViewThe July 6 editorial page included a very interesting political cartoon by KAL that perfectly illustrates the double standard that the liberals in this country practice on a daily basis.In the cartoon, irate rioters in support of the flag burning amendment, school prayer amendment and the balanced budget amendment assail the Constitution.Obviously, the artist who drew the cartoon believes that these amendments assault the freedoms guaranteed to him in the Constitution. I would like to ask where is the cartoon that points out the assaults on the Second, Fourth, Sixth, Eighth and 10th amendments that have been going on for years?
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | October 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton entered office with the job of charting America's foreign policy beyond the Cold War. Nine months later, a series of self-inflicted wounds to his prestige has hobbled his efforts, raising questions about his ability to project force credibly abroad.Doubts about the American leader's competence in world affairs -- overseas, on Capitol Hill and among the public -- are high. In a recent Gallup poll, approval of the president's handling of foreign affairs dropped from 51 percent to 40 percent.
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