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NEWS
September 21, 2011
I was pleased to learn that President Obama's new deficit plan includes ending $41 billion in subsidies to Big Oil ("Federal workers groups, contractors opposed Obama debt plan," Sept. 19). This is good news for America and good news for Maryland because Big Oil has been profiting from pollution for too long. Producing, refining and burning oil is a dirty business. It spoils our waterways with disastrous spills and poisons the air that Maryland families breathe. This summer, Exxon was responsible for spilling 42,000 gallons of oil into the Yellowstone River, a source of beauty and inspiration for the entire country.
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NEWS
September 16, 2013
I was sorry to learn that special interest groups are looking out for themselves with total disregard for the nation's best interests as they seek to undo former President George W. Bush's major piece of climate change legislation, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act ( "How Big Poultry sided with Big Oil," Sept. 11). However, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act will only reduce vehicular emissions, and only by a relatively small amount. What we really need is legislation that will motivate all industries across the economy and around the world to reduce emissions.
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NEWS
May 25, 2010
Here's something else for Sarah Palin to wonder about ("Palin wonders if Obama too tight with oil industry," May 24). Maybe she should ask Vice President Cheney why he and the Bush administration have stonewalled for years about allowing information from the meetings of their energy task force to be released. This group headed by Mr. Cheney, which included executives from the major oil companies, was assembled in the second week of the Bush administration. In spite of repeated requests through the years under the Freedom of Information Act for release of the group's activities and decisions, we still do not know what deals were made.
NEWS
By Reid Detchon | September 11, 2013
Oil is essential to our economic and national security because our transportation system runs on it. The danger of this monopoly is that consumers must pay whatever price is charged for gasoline or diesel. The danger to our nation is that our foreign policy and military strategy are hostage to the need to protect oil supplies in the Middle East. The only way out of this box is to give consumers something new — a choice in fuels. The most powerful step that Washington has ever taken toward energy independence — the goal of half a dozen presidents, including George H.W. Bush, for whom I served in the Energy Department — was a 2007 law that put us on a path toward a competitive transportation fuel market through the production and consumption of renewable fuel in America.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
The goofiest part about the O'Malley campaign's absurd attempt to link Bob Ehrlich , in an attack ad released last week, to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill? It's not the part about the two pro-oil votes he cast as a congressman, the ones that put him in league with such Big Oil lackeys as Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski and then-Rep. Ben Cardin . Or where the ad takes a snippet of Ehrlich saying, "Drill, baby, drill," and tries to pass it off as anything other than Ehrlich parroting his former lieutenant, Michael Steele . (The ex-gov from Arbutus is about as likely to share Steele's Telly Savalas -y "baby" verbal tic as he is Steele's hip-hop tailor.
NEWS
September 19, 2012
Fifty years after Rachel Carson was attacked by industrial interests for writing "Silent Spring" ("'Silent Spring' echo still eloquent," Sept. 16), the players have changed but the game is still the same. Courageous climate scientists such as James Hansen, Michael Mann, Katharine Hayhoe and Kerry Emanuel are routinely smeared by representatives of the fossil fuel industry for highlighting the risks of unrestricted greenhouse gas emissions. Even those who point out that a revenue-neutral carbon tax is the best way to solve the problem of global warming have been assaulted in online alleys by Big Oil's goons.
NEWS
By Thomas Oliphant | June 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Why? Why now? Why so much? For that matter, why at all? Simple. The oil business is still as much a racket as it is economic enterprise, and politics remains as important a component in the price of its products as oil, refining and transportation costs. And where politics intrudes, antitrust collusion and price-gouging flow right along with the crude. At first, last winter's price increases bore a straightforward connection to the attempt by the international cartel to reassert world market power by limiting production.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 22, 2008
Stand back. Give me some air. Everybody, please, back off. Someone call a doctor. I just read the outside of the bag that came back from the corner pharmacy: $180.38 for 30 capsules of medication that I need to improve the quality of my life and perhaps extend it. The co-pay was $76.60, but still ... Someone call the cops! If Obama gets elected, can we just arrest the people who run the drug companies that charge this kind of price? I say take the CEO and the board of directors and hold them at Gitmo.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
When former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. chose for his post-political career a job heading up a new Baltimore office of a major corporate law firm from North Carolina, he opened himself up for legitimate criticism. The firm, Womble Carlyle, has a long history representing tobacco producers, and its other clients include big pharmaceutical firms, foreign corporations and some oil companies. This is not exactly working in a soup kitchen, and Gov. Martin O'Malley's campaign is well within its rights to question whether the Republican former governor has spent the last four years putting people first or earning big paychecks looking out for the interests of unsympathetic corporations.
NEWS
By Jacob Heilbrunn | June 26, 2008
Here we go again. Soaring oil prices have sent Washington politicians into overdrive to come up with a variety of legislative plans that aim to lower the cost of energy by targeting oil companies. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, for example, has declared: "I'll make oil companies like Exxon pay a tax on their windfall profits, and we'll use the money to help families pay for their skyrocketing energy costs and other bills." It may sound good in theory, but if history is any guide, this is a pipe dream.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Thanks for Nancy Unger's article on Rachel Carson, whose research was denounced in the popular press, dismissed as hysterical, and considered by some to reflect communist sympathies ("'Silent Spring' still echoes," Sept. 16). Carson's story doesn't sound that different from the way scientists who study climate change are treated today. The popular press feels compelled to "balance" the reporting of scientific results with quotes from pseudo-scientists hired by Big Oil. Even though climate scientists have often understated the severity of climate change, their results are similarly dismissed as exaggerated and apocalyptic.
NEWS
September 19, 2012
Fifty years after Rachel Carson was attacked by industrial interests for writing "Silent Spring" ("'Silent Spring' echo still eloquent," Sept. 16), the players have changed but the game is still the same. Courageous climate scientists such as James Hansen, Michael Mann, Katharine Hayhoe and Kerry Emanuel are routinely smeared by representatives of the fossil fuel industry for highlighting the risks of unrestricted greenhouse gas emissions. Even those who point out that a revenue-neutral carbon tax is the best way to solve the problem of global warming have been assaulted in online alleys by Big Oil's goons.
NEWS
February 24, 2012
The news article by Gus Sentementes about the reasons for the current rise in gas prices ("Increases fueled by demand in China and India, turmoil in Mideast," Feb. 22) curiously omits three other and more important reasons for the rise in gas prices: failure of the Obama administration to approve new U.S. land and offshore oil drilling permits, failure to approve the Keystone XL pipeline to Texas, and failure to proceed with investigations into oil speculation. In 2007, when gas prices were at the unbelievable rate of $3.22, then-Senator Barack Obama demanded the FTC investigate "big oil. " In the 2008 presidential election year, presidential nominee Barack Obama blamed the Bush administration for lacking an energy policy to combat high oil prices.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
I observe religious beliefs making politicians less responsible. Consider anyone who believes their particular prophet actually existed and rose to heaven, or especially that the Earth is only 6,000 years old, in spite of plentiful evidence to the contrary. They believe that no matter how much they poison my environment to benefit Big Oil or Big Coal, their savior will swoop down and take them to an imaginary heaven when global warming sterilizes the planet. They are categorically not qualified for any office.
NEWS
September 21, 2011
I was pleased to learn that President Obama's new deficit plan includes ending $41 billion in subsidies to Big Oil ("Federal workers groups, contractors opposed Obama debt plan," Sept. 19). This is good news for America and good news for Maryland because Big Oil has been profiting from pollution for too long. Producing, refining and burning oil is a dirty business. It spoils our waterways with disastrous spills and poisons the air that Maryland families breathe. This summer, Exxon was responsible for spilling 42,000 gallons of oil into the Yellowstone River, a source of beauty and inspiration for the entire country.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is investigating a Rockville gasoline distributor after prices at the pump jumped 25 cents overnight last week, he said Monday. The inquiry takes place as Senate Democrats prepare a vote on legislation that would curb federal tax subsidies to the largest oil companies. Gansler said Empire Petroleum Holdings, which serves gas stations in Anne Arundel and Montgomery counties, has cooperated with his investigation, which he said he launched in response to a consumer complaint.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Hooke | April 22, 2008
Near-record prices at gas pumps and record earnings for oil companies prompted calls at congressional hearings this month for the companies to pay extra taxes, to find more oil supplies and to invest in alternative energy. Lawmakers suggested that the industry is failing the American consumer, and its tax breaks should be revoked. Oil executives, meanwhile, insist the companies are doing all they can to alleviate the crisis. They note that although their profits are high in absolute terms, such returns are consistent with other businesses.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
Every day that passes brings worse news about BP's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Some experts are calling it the worst environmental disaster since the Exxon Valdez spill off the Alaska coast in 1989. Some think it will be much worse than that. Yet the Obama administration seems oddly determined to treat the crisis as business as usual; other than the president wagging his finger at a few oil company executives for pointing their fingers at each other in an attempt to shift responsibility for the mess, the government's most forceful effort to date has been to announce a reorganization of the regulatory agency whose failures may have contributed to the tragedy.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Gulf oil coated state politics last week as Democrats in Maryland's two highest-profile contests tried to tar their likely Republican opponents with the BP spill. Maryland Republicans responded with indignation: Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. accused Gov. Martin O'Malley of "seeking to take advantage of the tragedy." The Maryland Republican Party, sticking up for congressional hopeful Andy Harris, scolded Rep. Frank Kratovil for trying to "capitalize" on the "worst environmental disaster in US history."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
The goofiest part about the O'Malley campaign's absurd attempt to link Bob Ehrlich , in an attack ad released last week, to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill? It's not the part about the two pro-oil votes he cast as a congressman, the ones that put him in league with such Big Oil lackeys as Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski and then-Rep. Ben Cardin . Or where the ad takes a snippet of Ehrlich saying, "Drill, baby, drill," and tries to pass it off as anything other than Ehrlich parroting his former lieutenant, Michael Steele . (The ex-gov from Arbutus is about as likely to share Steele's Telly Savalas -y "baby" verbal tic as he is Steele's hip-hop tailor.
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