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By Matt Patterson | August 8, 2011
On July 10, three Chicago-area Alderwoods funeral homes were viciously vandalized. All were Dignity Memorial network facilities that had also been targeted for a strike by local Teamsters. Teamsters Local 727, which represents 16 Alderwoods embalmers, drivers and funeral directors, had been negotiating with the company that owns the homes after their labor contract expired June 30. The union complained that the other side had bargained in bad faith and had "…proposed a three-year wage freeze and a company health care package that is more expensive and less comprehensive than the union's health and welfare benefits," reports the Chicago Sun-Times.
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NEWS
August 9, 2011
In reference to your recent op-ed piece on the vandalism perpetrated against several Chicago-area funeral homes last month ("Big Labor shows its ugly side," Aug. 8), I would suggest some perspective is in order. Flunkies from Big Business almost shut down the United States government. Flunkies from Big Labor vandalized three funeral homes in Chicago. Toenail fungus is ugly but cancer will kill you. David Ingalls, Severna Park
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NEWS
August 9, 2011
In reference to your recent op-ed piece on the vandalism perpetrated against several Chicago-area funeral homes last month ("Big Labor shows its ugly side," Aug. 8), I would suggest some perspective is in order. Flunkies from Big Business almost shut down the United States government. Flunkies from Big Labor vandalized three funeral homes in Chicago. Toenail fungus is ugly but cancer will kill you. David Ingalls, Severna Park
NEWS
By Matt Patterson | August 8, 2011
On July 10, three Chicago-area Alderwoods funeral homes were viciously vandalized. All were Dignity Memorial network facilities that had also been targeted for a strike by local Teamsters. Teamsters Local 727, which represents 16 Alderwoods embalmers, drivers and funeral directors, had been negotiating with the company that owns the homes after their labor contract expired June 30. The union complained that the other side had bargained in bad faith and had "…proposed a three-year wage freeze and a company health care package that is more expensive and less comprehensive than the union's health and welfare benefits," reports the Chicago Sun-Times.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | April 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The biggest political news of last week was not Bob Dole's triumph over Pat Buchanan in California. It was the AFL-CIO's endorsing the re-election of President Clinton, with plans to spend $35 million to bring that about.This Big Labor intervention may not restore the great Democratic coalition of the 1950s and 60s, but a labor-union political onslaught could all but guarantee Mr. Clinton a second term, especially with polled organized laborers now favoring him over Bob Dole by a 3-to-1 margin.
NEWS
April 17, 1992
Labor relations in the United States have now gotten down to the gut issue of a union's right to strike versus a management's right to hire permanent replacement workers. Both of these mighty weapons are enshrined in law; both are cherished by the respective combatants; both are an unproductive part of a free economy's give and take.What brought the issue to a head was a bitter five-month confrontation between Caterpillar Inc., the No. 2 U.S. exporter, and the United Automobile Workers, the most powerful of AFL-CIO components.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the first presidential caucuses and primaries still nearly four months away, Vice President Al Gore is facing another test of his political credibility next week -- a decision by the AFL-CIO on whether to endorse him or delay the decision.The informed opinion now is that Gore will get the endorsement, though it is by no means assured. In most presidential election cycles, Big Labor's support for a sitting Democratic vice president would be pro forma.But Gore's uncertain campaign has given his rival for the nomination, Bill Bradley, the grounds to question whether the unions might be moving too fast.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A year ago Bill Clinton won the Democratic nomination and then the presidency by offering himself as "a different kind of Democrat." By winning the fourth-quarter fight for the North American Free Trade Agreement, he now has demonstrated what that means.The Clinton message in the 1992 campaign was that he represented a break with the long line of liberal Democrats -- the George McGoverns and Walter Mondales and Michael Dukakises -- who were still wedded to the social policies and programs of the Great Society and still driven by the economic thinking of organized labor and the other special constituencies of his party.
NEWS
July 25, 1994
Weep not for Big Labor. Though it has again lost its top priority issue for the year -- this time an effort to stop management from hiring permanent replacement workers during a strike over economic disputes -- this does not mean the union movement is heading toward oblivion. What it does mean is that labor has to change tactics to deal with revolutionary changes in a highly competitive world workplace.The Senate debate this month, which found organized labor unable to break a Republican filibuster threat despite the presence of a Democrat in the White House, was oddly anachronistic.
NEWS
November 9, 1993
Win or lose the NAFTA vote, President Clinton's gutsy stand on behalf of free trade and better relations with Mexico and Latin America constitutes his finest hour since taking office.His high-stakes gamble in sending Vice President Al Gore into a debate tonight with demagogic Ross Perot and his outspoken attack on the "rough-shod, muscle-bound" anti-NAFTA tactics of Big Labor may or may not provide the push needed for a victory next week in the House of Representatives. But this much is sure: passivity by the president would surely doom the agreement, undercut Mr. Clinton's prestige at home and abroad and send the signal that the United States is indeed turning inward and protectionist.
NEWS
July 27, 2005
BIG LABOR - the AFL-CIO - celebrated its 50th birthday this week with a historic and painful divorce that heightens the uncertainties facing unions and workers in America. After decades of decline, an internal rift over how to resurrect organized labor erupted with two of the nation's largest unions walking out of the labor federation. The dissidents - led by the Service Employees International Union and the Teamsters - say they will focus more on aggressive recruiting and organizing to amass the density of members within single industries to confront the growing clout of multinational corporations, instead of following the federation's past emphasis on lobbying and Democratic Party politics.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - As John Kerry clasped hands triumphantly yesterday with John Sweeney, the chieftain of big labor, he clinched his standing with a group whose powers to turn out voters have helped countless Democrats win elections. But the alliance between Kerry and the labor unions is more complicated than rousing chants and colorful placards might suggest. A weakened labor movement - its political clout diminished after three years of legislative and electoral defeats - must prove that it can, once again, help deliver a victory on Election Day. And Kerry, a Democrat who has clashed with unions on trade and other issues in his two decades in Congress, is under intense pressure to prove himself worthy of labor's support.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
Baltimore's police union endorsed Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s bid for governor last night, the first time the organization has backed a Republican gubernatorial candidate in 36 years. The board of directors of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, which represents 5,000 current and retired city police officers, unanimously selected Ehrlich over Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend two weeks ago. The full union membership ratified the board's decision at a meeting last night. The union becomes the first major labor group to line up behind Ehrlich, but the political significance of the endorsement is unclear.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Section 8 housing has undermined quality of life For almost 18 years I have lived in a pleasant, racially mixed townhouse condominium community consisting of decent working-class people. Then some investors, none of whom who live in the community, took it upon themselves to organize, without any input from the community, and lease their properties in the Section 8 program. The end result has been devastating. The vast majority of the participants in the program have demonstrated complete disregard for the rights and property of others.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the first presidential caucuses and primaries still nearly four months away, Vice President Al Gore is facing another test of his political credibility next week -- a decision by the AFL-CIO on whether to endorse him or delay the decision.The informed opinion now is that Gore will get the endorsement, though it is by no means assured. In most presidential election cycles, Big Labor's support for a sitting Democratic vice president would be pro forma.But Gore's uncertain campaign has given his rival for the nomination, Bill Bradley, the grounds to question whether the unions might be moving too fast.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | September 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton says the decision about whether he wins "fast-track" authority to negotiate trade agreements is a matter of deciding whether "to advance or retreat." In political terms, however, it is far more complex.The president can make a persuasive case for being given the same flexibility Congress has given every president since Gerald R. Ford and almost routinely approved for George Bush six years ago. The mind boggles at the prospect of Congress picking apart every trade agreement clause by clause rather than being required to vote either acceptance or rejection, as fast-track provides.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 12, 1992
The heads of the nation's major blue-collar unions are to meet today to grapple with presidential politics, but it is increasingly unlikely that Gov. Bill Clinton will win a unified endorsement from big labor anytime before the Democratic Convention in July.The reason? Although many union officials now believe Mr. Clinton is virtually assured of the Democratic nomination, several key blue-collar unions, especially the United Auto Workers, remain angry over Mr. Clinton's labor record and unsure of his commitment to labor issues.
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 14, 1996
Last December, the national leaders of the AFL-CIO unveiled a $1 million radio and TV ad campaign attacking freshman members of Congress -- myself included -- for supporting a balanced budget. The ads grossly mischaracterized this vote as being "against working families."Newly installed AFL-CIO President John Sweeney predicted that the ads would flood congressional offices with "hundreds" of angry calls. As it turned out, Mr. Sweeney was only partially right.Approximately 90 percent of the several dozen calls I received supported my vote.
NEWS
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 1997
In "Primary Colors," journalist Joe Klein's Anonymous novel of the 1992 presidential campaign, the character based on Bill Clinton addresses New Hampshire shipyard workers in their union hall. Wounded by alleged sex scandals, he is emboldened to utter what Klein clearly believes are difficult truths:"No politician can bring these shipyard jobs back. Or make your union strong again ... Because we're living in a new world, a world without borders - economically, that is. Guy can push a button in New York and move a billion dollars to Tokyo before you can blink ..."
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | October 2, 1996
CLEVELAND -- Nineteen years ago, baby-faced Dennis Kucinich, age 31 but looking like a teen-ager, startled Ohio by being elected mayor of what was then called ''The Mistake on the Lake'' (Erie). Two years later, the city under ''Dennis the Menace'' was in default and he was voted out.Today, a physically and psychologically rehabilitated Cleveland has made an amazing comeback and Mr. Kucinich, now approaching his 50th birthday but still baby-faced, is also on the comeback trail, as the Democratic nominee for Congress in the 10th District.
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