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Gus G. Sentementes | May 25, 2012
Big Huge Games , a studio in Timonium that designed rich, immersive video games, has closed its office and only a skeleton crew of employees remained as its parent company in Rhode Island appears to have gone out of business, according to online reports.  The Timonium office, which is on the fifth floor of an office building on Greenspring Drive, was dark and locked. An employee ferrying boxes on a cart in the lobby of the fifth floor told me I needed to call the Rhode Island office for comment.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Big Huge Games in Timonium closed last May, taking nearly 100 jobs with it. Nine months later, a local studio that was launched from the ashes of the video game-maker shut down, too. And Zynga, which created FarmVille and Words with Friends, closed its Baltimore County office several weeks ago. So why aren't local game developers freaking out? They're used to volatility - not this much, but quite a bit. And even with big game-makers facing tough competition and multimillion-dollar costs, tiny independent studios are popping up locally to take advantage of new opportunities in mobile and online gaming - and new ways of raising money to get games made.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Computers, desks, chairs and other office equipment and items that belonged to the now-defunct Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based video game maker, will be auctioned Tuesday as part of the company's Chapter 7 bankruptcy and liquidation. Big Huge Games was a part of 38 Studios LLC, a Providence, R.I.-based video game company owned by former professional baseball player Curt Schilling. The firm ran out of money and shut down in May, tossing hundreds of people out of work, including about 100 in Timonium.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Epic Games Inc., a North Carolina-based video game manufacturer, closed its office in Baltimore County last month, laying off 40 employees, Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Thursday. Epic announced in August it was opening Impossible Studios in Hunt Valley, hiring 36 employees, some of whom had lost their jobs months earlier at Big Huge Games of Timonium. Big Huge closed in May after its parent company, 38 Studios, abruptly shut down because of financial problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | May 25, 2012
On Thursday, the entire staffs of 38 Studios and Big Huge Games were given pink slips. The company, which released “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” (which I reviewed in February ), was in partnership with the state of Rhode Island to bring jobs into the state and give former MLB pitcher Curt Schilling's 38 Studios fuel to evolve into a big-time game developer. The company was in the midst of developing a project called “Copernicus,” an MMORPG based in the same universe as “Amalur.” Big Huge Games, based in Timonium, became a subsidiary of 38 Studios almost three years ago to the day. The Sun's Gus Sentementes was over at Big Huge ' s offices before being booted out today , but it seems the entire teams at both companies have indeed been let go. WPRI has an exce llent timeline of how the tax credit and loan between the state of Rhode Island and 38 Studios developed.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
About 100 employees of Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based maker of video games, lost their jobs this week as the studio and its Rhode Island-based parent company abruptly shut down because of financial problems. The 12-year-old company was one of the anchors of Baltimore County's well-established video game industry, which has grown steadily since the 1980s as the popularity of computer and console games has skyrocketed. Big Huge Games was owned by 38 Studios, a Providence, R.I.-based company founded by former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling in 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 29, 2012
Ben Walsh doesn't have a lot of time to play games these days. As CEO and president of the Baltimore-based Pure Bang Games, Walsh spends his waking hours leading a team of nine developers aiming to release a new social game every few months.  The irony, of course, is that Walsh is a lifelong gamer who, if he ever took a vacation, "would sit down and do nothing but play" all the games he's been missing out on since starting Pure Bang in...
FEATURES
September 14, 2006
Exhibit Video game art The artistic talents required to create a video game are the fo cus of Big Huge Games: From Concept to Game, opening to day at Maryland Institute Col lege of Art's Rosenberg Gal lery. Big Huge Games is a Maryland gaming company that developed the game Rise of Nations: Rise of Legends. MICA is at 1300 Mount Royal Ave. The exhibition is free. The gallery is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. For more informa tion, visit www.mica.edu or call 410-225-2300.
BUSINESS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | March 20, 2009
A video-game publisher said yesterday that it could close a Timonium-based subsidiary in 60 days if no buyer is found. THQ Inc.'s decision to sell or close Big Huge Games is part of an effort to cut costs by $220 million, said Julie MacMedan, vice president of investor relations and corporate communications for the company, which is headquartered in Agoura Hills, Calif. THQ announced a $120 million reduction in November, but updated that figure last month, she said. "What we had to do was evaluate projects in development and studios, and determine if we could afford to continue to pursue those projects," MacMedan said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Epic Games Inc., a North Carolina-based video game manufacturer, closed its office in Baltimore County last month, laying off 40 employees, Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Thursday. Epic announced in August it was opening Impossible Studios in Hunt Valley, hiring 36 employees, some of whom had lost their jobs months earlier at Big Huge Games of Timonium. Big Huge closed in May after its parent company, 38 Studios, abruptly shut down because of financial problems.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Zynga, the video game maker best known for FarmVille and Words With Friends, has closed its Timonium office as part of a broader corporate consolidation, company officials said Monday. The company also made changes at three other offices, closing and consolidating some in Texas and New York. The company did not say how many jobs were being cut, but said that the moves affected about 1 percent of its work force of more than 3,000. About half of those in the Timonium office were relocated.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Hundreds of computers, monitors, pieces of office furniture and digital design tools were auctioned Tuesday in Timonium to raise money for creditors of defunct Big Huge Games and its Rhode Island parent company, 38 Studios LLC. Traces of a one-time creative environment remained on the fifth floor of a Timonium office building as people bid on hundreds of video games, game consoles, pingpong and pool tables, and stereo and audio equipment. "This was a great place to work," quipped Matt Greenberg, a Baltimore County resident who was looking to buy furniture.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Computers, desks, chairs and other office equipment and items that belonged to the now-defunct Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based video game maker, will be auctioned Tuesday as part of the company's Chapter 7 bankruptcy and liquidation. Big Huge Games was a part of 38 Studios LLC, a Providence, R.I.-based video game company owned by former professional baseball player Curt Schilling. The firm ran out of money and shut down in May, tossing hundreds of people out of work, including about 100 in Timonium.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2012
Back in May, one of the biggest video game companies in Maryland -- Big Huge Games of Timonium -- imploded, as its parent company in Rhode Island, 38 Studios, collapsed from a lack of money. Somewhere around 90-100 or so were laid off abruptly at Big Huge's office, which helped design the "Kingdom of Amalur: Reckoning" video game, which was released earlier this year. Big Huge was part of former baseball start Curt Schilling's 38 Studios, which left a trail of mess since its collaps and bankruptcy in Rhode Island . But there's a silver lining.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 25, 2012
Big Huge Games , a studio in Timonium that designed rich, immersive video games, has closed its office and only a skeleton crew of employees remained as its parent company in Rhode Island appears to have gone out of business, according to online reports.  The Timonium office, which is on the fifth floor of an office building on Greenspring Drive, was dark and locked. An employee ferrying boxes on a cart in the lobby of the fifth floor told me I needed to call the Rhode Island office for comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | May 25, 2012
On Thursday, the entire staffs of 38 Studios and Big Huge Games were given pink slips. The company, which released “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” (which I reviewed in February ), was in partnership with the state of Rhode Island to bring jobs into the state and give former MLB pitcher Curt Schilling's 38 Studios fuel to evolve into a big-time game developer. The company was in the midst of developing a project called “Copernicus,” an MMORPG based in the same universe as “Amalur.” Big Huge Games, based in Timonium, became a subsidiary of 38 Studios almost three years ago to the day. The Sun's Gus Sentementes was over at Big Huge ' s offices before being booted out today , but it seems the entire teams at both companies have indeed been let go. WPRI has an exce llent timeline of how the tax credit and loan between the state of Rhode Island and 38 Studios developed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2006
Guitar concert The lowdown -- Classical guitarist Ana Vidovic, who finished her studies at Peabody with the much-acclaimed Manuel Barrueco in 2003, will give a concert at An die Musik to launch the release of her DVD recital, Ana Vidovic: Guitar Virtuoso from Mel Bay. The Croatian-born guitarist has several competition prizes and CD releases to her credit, not to mention a busy international concert career. If you go -- The concert is at 7 p.m. Sunday at An die Musik, 409 N. Charles St. Tickets are $18 and $20. Call 410-385-2638.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Zynga Inc., one of the largest developers of online games for social networks, said Tuesday that it will open its first East Coast office in the Baltimore region this year, and it will be led by an area veteran in the gaming industry. The office will have 12 to 15 employees this year and will work on an unspecified new social network game, the company said. Zynga East, the name of the new office, will also work on projects with the company's game developers in its San Francisco headquarters.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
About 100 employees of Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based maker of video games, lost their jobs this week as the studio and its Rhode Island-based parent company abruptly shut down because of financial problems. The 12-year-old company was one of the anchors of Baltimore County's well-established video game industry, which has grown steadily since the 1980s as the popularity of computer and console games has skyrocketed. Big Huge Games was owned by 38 Studios, a Providence, R.I.-based company founded by former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling in 2006.
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