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By Lynne Muller and Lynne Muller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 1998
The world was a very different place when Clayton Dorn, founder of Forest Oil, built a country lodge for his family in the mountains near Bradford, Penn.In the late 1920s and early '30s, when the Hansel-and-Gretel-style Big House and secluded family cabins at Glendorn were built, there were plentiful hardwoods, like chestnut and butternut, to panel the walls. There were leisurely family trips to Europe, where Dorn's adult children, Forest and Erla, bought crystal and china and chose tile in the latest art deco patterns to lavish on bathrooms, kitchens and 41 fireplaces.
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By Christianna McCausland and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
When homeowners Judy and Craig purchased 57 acres in Deale, Anne Arundel County, on which to build their dream home, they weren't building just a shelter from the elements or a place to keep their belongings. They were creating an environment that would be the foundation for a lifestyle. Judy, who had always wanted a farm, would finally have room to house her driving ponies and raise her own food. For Craig, an engineer, the new house would be an expression of his desire for a sustainable, energy-efficient lifestyle.
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NEWS
August 13, 2013
Historian Fred Shoken observes the mystery that early documents refer to our principal city as "Baltemore" ( "Happy birthday, Baltemore!" Aug. 7). The city got its name indirectly from Charles Calvert Lord Baltimore, who got his title from an Irish town called Baltimore, which is an anglicization of the Irish "Baile an Tí Mhóir" meaning "town of the big house. " Since the state prison or "big house" is indeed in Baltimore, this is an appropriate if unflattering appellation. Meanwhile the Irish town of Baltimore is now called by another name in Irish.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Historian Fred Shoken observes the mystery that early documents refer to our principal city as "Baltemore" ( "Happy birthday, Baltemore!" Aug. 7). The city got its name indirectly from Charles Calvert Lord Baltimore, who got his title from an Irish town called Baltimore, which is an anglicization of the Irish "Baile an Tí Mhóir" meaning "town of the big house. " Since the state prison or "big house" is indeed in Baltimore, this is an appropriate if unflattering appellation. Meanwhile the Irish town of Baltimore is now called by another name in Irish.
SPORTS
February 25, 1996
Opponent: Rochester AmericansSite: Baltimore ArenaTime: 5 p.m.Radio: WITH (1230 AM), WAMD (970 AM)Outlook: The Bandits start the second half of their six-game season series with the Americans and, no matter what, they can't do worse than they did in the first half: 0-3, outscored 15-7 and competitive just once. Having gone 1-4-4 on home ice since Jan. 10, the Bandits had a big night Friday before a big house (7,058), whipping Providence, 7-4. The Amerks, after trailing the five-team Central Division field most of the season, are on a 9-2-1 tear and have vaulted into second place.
FEATURES
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Contributing Writer | August 15, 1993
A recent survey, commissioned by Black & Decker, maker of the "Dustbuster," produced a finding that will come as a surprise to absolutely no one: More and more of us are doing less and less housekeeping. In fact, 43 percent of women and 21 percent of men are doing less housecleaning now than five years ago.The survey cites a new tolerance for dust bunnies. Because more women are working full time outside the home, and both women and men are just too busy doing other things, the white-glove test has been forsaken.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
Country Life Farm in Harford County is a place where the bloodlines of the humans and of the horses have flowed through time and into the future with the ease of a stream. On this Preakness Week morning, the thoroughbred mare Go Steady nurses her 12-day-old foal in a paddock, while up at The Big House, as it is known, three strapping young men circle their grandmother's refrigerator with the same thing in mind — food. "I may grow old," said Mary Jo Pons, the matriarch of a family that has lived and bred horses here since the Depression.
FEATURES
By THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 22, 2005
Designers like to use the term "less is more" to describe what the interior of a house should look like. Less clutter, fewer pieces of furniture, less space. But it wasn't until architect Sarah Susanka came along with her Not So Big House series of books that homeowners could actually see what "less is more" looked like. Now Susanka and co-author Marc Vassallo are out with a new entry, Inside the Not So Big House, full of more ideas for those not caught up in McMansion fever. Smart use of space is key to design in a small space, Susanka says.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 2000
Gayle and Fred Snyder own a home rich in history. Built in 1890, it sits just one block from Laurel's Main Street in the historic district. Once, the home's residents rose to the smells of baking bread from the bakery across the alley. A mom-and-pop grocery store was around the corner if anyone needed a gallon of milk or a bag of sugar. Today the bakery is a trendy coffee bar, and mom and pop have been replaced by a convenience store, but many of the homes in the Laurel Main Street area look unchanged from the day they were built.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | January 10, 1999
Considering that she's challenging the way architects design houses, the way builders build them, the way appraisers appraise them, and the way real estate agents sell them -- not to mention the way people live in them -- it may seem surprising that Sarah Susanka hasn't gotten into trouble over her new book, "The Not So Big House: A Blueprint for the Way We Really Live" (Taunton Press, 1998, $30). "I've talked to builders and Realtors at conventions, and I tell them, I feel like I'm walking into the lion's den," says architect Susanka, a principal with Mulfinger, Susanka, Mahady & Partners of Minneapolis and Stillwater, Minn.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Monday's announcement that Johns Hopkins would join the Big Ten in 2015 can be viewed as a new beginning for the program. It also signals an end to its traditional status as an independent. Next season will be the Blue Jays' 131st and final campaign as an independent. During that time, they captured 44 national championships and nine NCAA titles and appeared in 41 of 43 NCAA tournaments. The program's run of success as an independent was not taken lightly by coach Dave Pietramala.
SPORTS
May 17, 2013
Baltimore Sun reporters Don Markus and Jeff Barker and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland sports. Given the 2014 schedule announced Thursday by the Big Ten, how tough will Maryland's road back to respectability become? Don Markus: Maryland's $52 million exit fee from the Atlantic Coast Conference after next season seems exorbitant, but its indoctrination into the Big Ten is pretty steep in its own right. Everyone knew the Terps would be stepping up in class in football by switching leagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Katie Hutchinson | January 9, 2013
For those of you have been having Jerzday withdrawals, we now have Snooki & JWOWW Tuesdays. And, unlike last season, each episode is an hour instead of a half an hour. I'm not going to lie: I do find both of these girls extremely entertaining. However, the first season of this show, at times, was like watching paint dry. I mean, I'm a girl I know what we do on a daily basis; it's nothing special or magical. It was straight-up boring. However, this season I am excited for!
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 1, 2012
A controversial big housing development in western Maryland that was reported last fall to be shelved apparently has new life. Terrapin Run, which sparked lawsuits and legislation to strengthen the state's Smart Growth laws, is back on track, Columbia developer Michael Carnock told WCBC radio in Cumberland.  He said he hopes to proceed with his original plan to build 4,000 townhomes in eastern Allegany County. The developer had reportedly been trying to sell the 935-acre site near the Green Ridge State Forest, and Allegany's county commissioners agreed to drop their lawsuit against the state planning and environment departments to aid a sale, according to the radio station.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
With a reported $100 million price tag and a big-name star like Kevin Spacey, "House of Cards" looks like a drama series that should be headed for HBO or AMC. But the 13 one-hour episodes that start filming in Baltimore in March under the direction of David Fincher are being made by and for Netflix. Yes, that Netflix, the one with the red-and-white envelopes you get via snail mail, or the one you stream programs from online. "House of Cards" is the biggest and most credible challenger yet to cable TV's control of quality original programming.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
Country Life Farm in Harford County is a place where the bloodlines of the humans and of the horses have flowed through time and into the future with the ease of a stream. On this Preakness Week morning, the thoroughbred mare Go Steady nurses her 12-day-old foal in a paddock, while up at The Big House, as it is known, three strapping young men circle their grandmother's refrigerator with the same thing in mind — food. "I may grow old," said Mary Jo Pons, the matriarch of a family that has lived and bred horses here since the Depression.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2007
Only the bravest will attempt to swing a golf club. Unless you're desperate enough to watch the Pro Bowl, football is finally, blessedly, over. That means it's an ideal weekend to get a primer on players and teams that could put the Madness in March. Saturday's viewing options are plenty, starting with No. 11 Marquette at No. 22 Georgetown, noon on ESPN. At halftime, turn the remote to CBS, where No. 2 UCLA and West Virginia tip off at 1 p.m. in Morgantown. At 3:30, ABC has No. 9 Kansas at Missouri.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | September 8, 1991
Until now, most homebuyers walked into a realty agent's office asking for a big house on a quiet street. They still want the big house and the quiet street -- but, more and more, they're also asking about the commute."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2010
Gregory A. Rapisarda has answered to the name "father" for decades, but that name will soon take on a much broader meaning. Rapisarda, a 62-year-old widower, father of four and grandfather of five, will be ordained today at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in North Baltimore. The Rev. John C. Rapisarda, ordained in 2008, will perform the vesting honors for his own father, placing on him a cream-colored chasuble, the vestment worn at Mass. And then, for the first time in the 221-year history of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, a father and son will both serve as parish priests, according to church officials.
BUSINESS
By Ken Harney | August 24, 2007
To add to mortgage meltdown miseries, the credit panic, plunging home sales and rising foreclosures, here's a new worry: a proposed cutoff of mortgage-interest tax deductions for all houses with more than 3,000 square feet. One of Capitol Hill's most experienced and powerful legislators is drafting a "carbon tax" bill that would do precisely that. Rep. John D. Dingell, the Michigan Democrat who heads the Energy and Commerce Committee, expects to introduce comprehensive climate change reform legislation once the House returns next month.
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