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By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
Alexandria, Va. — Sitting in a ballroom with not a hint of sunlight slipping through the thick curtains as biologists and bureaucrats chatter endlessly about fecundity and fish mortality makes it hard to remember the connection between science and fish. Then someone e-mails a photo to you and it all makes sense and you want to run to the front of the room hollering: "Do something. Do it now." It's time to make things right for the fish and ensure that kids who build reef balls for the Chesapeake Bay today will have something tugging at their lines someday that will make them grin and make their hearts pound and produce a snapshot they'll cherish until they're old. Something like the feeling Kevin Howell had last weekend.
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SPORTS
By Louis Krauss, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
One might not associate ocean fishing with 100-pound fish, sponsorships and millions in cash prizes. But for fishing boat captain Ted Deppe, that's what it is. The 52-year-old from Crownsville, along with two crewmates and five anglers, spend much of their free time competing in ocean fishing competitions, and have been very successful - so much so that Deppe's team was recently offered a sponsorship from Under Armour, which pays for its gear....
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 8, 2011
Wearing a black suit and a bright orange tie, Dan Duquette stepped to the podium at the Warehouse, nearly knocked over a bottle of water when he set down his notepad and fiddled with the microphone for a second. When he finally spoke, he first talked about his Orioles ties and the Oriole Way. He thanked Peter Angelos, who wasn't in attendance, for the opportunity. He reminisced about pretending he was legendary Orioles third baseman Brooks Robinson back when he swung for the lilac bushes while playing Wiffle Ball as a kid. After introducing himself to a packed house of media members and Orioles employees for about 10 minutes, the franchise's new executive vice president of baseball operations then began answering tough questions.
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 9, 2013
Tommy Jones of Severna Park took the top spot at Ocean City's 40th Annual White Marlin Open Wednesday, catching an 83-pound white marlin that could be worth $980,000 in prize money. Today is the last day to fish in the tournament, one of the largest billfish competitions in the world, where hundreds of anglers compete to catch the largest tuna, wahoo, shark, dolphin, blue marlin and most importantly, white marlin. Anglers are allowed three days during the five-day tournament to fish -- with most competitors opting to fish earlier in the week; only 38 boats out of the 262 in the competition are eligible to fish Friday.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Sitting in a ballroom with not a hint of sunlight slipping through the thick curtains as biologists and bureaucrats chatter endlessly about fecundity and fish mortality makes it hard to remember the connection between science and fish. Then someone e-mails a photo to you and it all makes sense and you want to run to the front of the room hollering: "Do something. Do it now." It's time to make things right for the fish and ensure that kids who build reef balls for the Chesapeake Bay today will have something tugging at their lines someday that will make them grin and make their hearts pound and produce a snapshot they'll cherish until they're old. Something like the feeling Kevin Howell had last weekend.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 15, 1991
Baltimore Orioles general manager Roland Hemond returned from a brief nap on the beach the other day, looking very much the Florida tourist. It was the shirt that blew his cover.The silk-screen design showed a large fish on the hook and put the annual winter meetings very much in perspective.It read: "I'd rather be marlin fishing in Cabo San Lucas."Hemond will get his wish soon. He will travel home to California this week and take the family on a Christmas vacation to Mexico. Perhaps he'll even drop a line in the water.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
Industrial fishing fleets have systematically stripped 90 percent of the giant tuna, swordfish, marlin and other big fish from the world's oceans, according to a new study that suggests that the virtual collapse of these stocks - such as happened to the cod off New England - is a distinct possibility. Fishing fleets are competing for the remnants of the biggest fish in the oceans, concludes a 10-year research project reported in today's issue of the science journal Nature. "Fishermen used to go out and catch these phenomenally big fish," said Ransom A. Myers, fisheries biologist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | September 11, 1994
The sun hasn't even hinted at an appearance as the Speculator slides away from the dock and heads toward the Atlantic. It's 5:30 in the morning, and Capt. Eric Blanks cruises around the inlet, past the rows of still-dark condominiums and hotels, and out to the ocean. He's the captain of the Speculator, a 37-foot Bertram sport-fishing boat that charters out of the Ocean City Fishing Center."You can get anything out here -- you never know," says Mr. Blanks from his perch on the bridge, the boat's middle level.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
Happy World Oceans Day - sort of.  Today marks the annual observance of the vast water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of Earth's surface.  It's a time for taking stock. Oceans regulate our climate (El Nino and La Nina, anyone?) and feed us, among other things. But 90 percent of the big predator fish that once roamed the seas are gone, according to biologists, and 20 percent of the coral reefs are similarly depleted.  Yet less than 2 percent of the oceans are formally protected.
FEATURES
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 6, 2004
NEW YORK - As Albert Finney sees it, there's a fundamental difference between him, a robust bull barreling into a Gotham hotel suite, and the tall-tale spinner he plays in Tim Burton's new film Big Fish. "I live stories rather than tell them," exclaims Finney, a lusty 67, the best-known British actor never to win an Oscar. He's likely to snag yet another nomination for his salty turn as the fantasist father of a realist son in Burton's fractured fairy tale, which goes into wide release Friday.
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
This week $2.4 million in prize money is up for grabs during the 40th annual White Marlin Open in Ocean City, one of the world's largest billfish tournaments. Even if you have no interest in fishing, the tournament is a sight to behold - from lines of boats headed out early in the morning to the giant fish weighed every evening. Registration for this year's open is over, but more than 260 boats have signed up for the five-day tournament that runs through Aug. 9. That's up from around 250 entries last year.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | July 28, 2012
So, three of the biggest names potentially available at the non-waiver trade deadline are already off the block. Philadelphia Phillies' lefty Cole Hamels signed a six-year, $144 million contract extension, while the Miami Marlins traded third baseman Hanley Ramirez to the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Milwaukee Brewers dealt pitcher Zack Greinke to the Los Angeles Angels. And I know what some of you are thinking: If the Orioles badly need a third baseman and a top-of-the-rotation starter, why didn't they trade for Ramirez or Greinke?
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
Happy World Oceans Day - sort of.  Today marks the annual observance of the vast water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of Earth's surface.  It's a time for taking stock. Oceans regulate our climate (El Nino and La Nina, anyone?) and feed us, among other things. But 90 percent of the big predator fish that once roamed the seas are gone, according to biologists, and 20 percent of the coral reefs are similarly depleted.  Yet less than 2 percent of the oceans are formally protected.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
— "Sturgie" is biding his time, waiting to be introduced to the right female. Caught off Hooper's Island five years ago, the hulking six-foot Atlantic sturgeon passes his days lolling about in a large tank at the University of Maryland's Horn Point Environmental Laboratory near Cambridge. Scientists have been experimenting with him and dozens of other sturgeon here, trying to unlock the secrets of breeding them in captivity and ultimately restore a big, ancient fish that's virtually vanished from Maryland waters.
SPORTS
Kevin Eck | January 17, 2012
TNA had the right idea on Thursday night's episode of Impact Wrestling as far as hyping Sunday's Sting-Kurt Angle match at the Hardcore Justice pay-per-view. In addition to a nicely done video package, the empty arena match between the two from a couple years ago was shown - with Angle providing commentary - and the final segment of the show featured the official contract signing for Sunday's match for Sting's TNA world title. After signing the contract, Sting and Angle both cut good promos that were designed to make their showdown at Hardcore Justice seem special.
EXPLORE
BY HAYWARD L. PUTNAM, Aegis Correspondent | December 27, 2011
Well another year has passed. Although there has a lot of problems we can still look back and find some great memories. If you are like me, many of the good things happened outdoors. Well another year has passed. Although there has a lot of problems we can still look back and find some great memories. If you are like me, many of the good things happened outdoors. While fishing with my Grandson he caught the biggest bass (nearly 10 pounds) while we fished a local pond. The big fish was carefully released and, hopefully, will be bigger come next summer.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 9, 2004
Watching Big Fish brings audiences the lighter-than-air euphoria of seeing a flat expanse of nylon expand into a soaring balloon, but it isn't just one more Tim Burton trip movie. This picture boasts a story about a yarn-spinning Southern father (Albert Finney) and a sober-sided son (Billy Crudup) that gives it ballast and staying power beyond anything in previous, precious Burton fables like Edward Scissorhands or Ed Wood. The central figure is yet another Edward, with the surname Bloom.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2002
OCEAN CITY - Here is where the impossibly tan meet the incredibly wealthy, where Gidget meets Thurston Howell III. This week, the Harbour Island Marina is a world untouched by everyday concerns like Enron, snakeheads - or SPF 40. It's all about the billfish, says the founder of the annual White Marlin Open. That's the reason thousands of spectators line the docks and boat slips each evening to cheer the tanned, muscled men who hoist huge fish pulled out of the Atlantic onto a digital scale.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | December 17, 2011
As usual, it looks like the Orioles are celebrating this holiday season on the cheap. No big-name free agents under the tree to energize the fan base. No va-va-voom trades to get folks counting down the days until spring training. Instead, here's a sample of who the O's have acquired thus far to reverse 14 straight losing seasons: A light-hitting backup catcher. A soft-throwing lefty starter from Japan. A journeyman lefty starter who has kicked around six other major league teams.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
Mike Dodson will be following a family tradition when he enlists next month in the U.S. Navy. His grandfather, James Dodson, served in the Navy during World War II. His uncle, James Jr., was on a Navy ship that was part of the blockade during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Last weekend, Dodson and his father, Steve, carried on another tradition - fishing together in the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association's Chesapeake Bay Fall Classic. Steve Dodson, 52, figured it would be the last time they fished in a tournament together before his 21-year-old son left to pursue a military career.
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