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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The first thing you need to know about the Big Easy is that it was a lot easier to get here than the last time I visited New Orleans. Got a cheap flight into Jackson, Miss., and the difference in fare for driving a couple of hours paid for the rental car for the whole week and - if I can get a reservation - dinner at Emeril's restaurant in the warehouse district. My previous trip, in January 1976, was quite a bit more involved. I drove here from Southern California with two friends during winter break with the intention of visiting the Crescent City and then continuing on to Miami to scare up some tickets for Super Bowl X. For some reason, I can't possibly expect to remember, we decided to stay in New Orleans, probably because of all the great libraries.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 4, 2013
If you just woke up from an eight-month nap and tuned into SportsCenter or any of the NFL shows on cable, you'll be surprised to learn that the Ravens will open the 2013 season on Thursday night without Ray Lewis, Ed Reed and a whole bunch of other key players from the reigning Super Bowl championship team. The rest of us made peace with that a long time ago, but the national media never met an obvious storyline it didn't like, so much of the buildup heading into the rematch of last year's crazy, double-overtime playoff game between the Ravens and Broncos has been focused on the defensive stars Peyton Manning won't be facing instead of the ones he will.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Are you ready for some gumbo? At 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 3, when the Ravens take on the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII, much of Baltimore will be watching, either from their stadium seats in New Orleans or here at home. Ravens fans not lucky enough to have tickets to the big game still have plenty of reason to celebrate at home in Baltimore, and they can do so in N'awlins style. According to local chefs with Louisiana roots, the Big Easy's cuisine is tailor-made for parties.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
If you gotta go, you gotta go. To Super Bowl XLVII, that is. And Ravens fans have got to go to New Orleans, getting there any which way they can. Direct flights from Baltimore to the Big Easy have long since sold out, leaving fans to come up with creative travel plans. Some are going for fly-and-drive combinations, like flying into Panama City Beach, Fla., - and making the roughly four-hour drive to New Orleans. Others are taking flights to Jackson, Miss., a relatively short drive of less than three hours.
NEWS
April 11, 2009
On April 8, 2009, BIG EASY; devoted father of Dawn Tharp and her husband Scott; loving grandfather of Isabel and Joslyn; lifelong brother of Dan and Debi Shannahan; member of the National Alliance of Fat Boys since 1984 serving on the Board of Directors (for over 25 years) - gone, but never forgotten. Also survived by many dedicated friends. A service will be held at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Visiting hours on Saturday, 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Interment private.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 1, 2006
NEW ORLEANS -- There was never any serious doubt among those who really know New Orleans that the city would rise again after Hurricane Katrina. Though bruised and battered, the city still receives too much love and offers too much profit potential to be ignored. What is not clear, a year after the storm, is what kind of New Orleans the recovered city will be. It still will be a port city and tourist town. Cargo traffic through the city's port system has returned to pre-Katrina levels, officials say. The oil and gas industries are recovering too. Tourism and hotel business still are down, largely because of canceled conventions, which usually book years in advance.
TRAVEL
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff | May 12, 2002
There's a lot to be said for visiting New Orleans without the kids, and friends said most of it to us: The greatest music is in 21-and-over joints. Children whose idea of haute cuisine is a hot dog will not appreciate etouffee and gumbo. Bourbon Street after dark is not a fit sight for the very young. There are no rides. But family power relationships being what they are these days, our party in the Big Easy consisted of four adults and five children: our friends' 14-year-old son; our son, 10; our daughters, 14 and 17; and my older daughter's pal, also 17. And we learned that for children in double digits who bring a sense of curiosity and adventure, this place can be a terrific destination.
TRAVEL
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 22, 2006
Mardi Gras, New Orleans' big party, will go on, organizers say, with parades and festivities slated for Feb. 18 to 28. Among the hotels ready for guests is the Windsor Court, with $969 covering two nights for two in a suite, including breakfast and tax. The "Bed and Beads" package is valid Feb. 17 to 28. (800-262- 2662; www.windsorcourthotel. com.) Another way to whoop it up in the Big Easy is with the Feb. 26 to March 2 "Mardi Gras Mambo" aboard RiverBarge Excursion Lines' 198-passenger vessel.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 31, 2007
Two years later, too little has changed in New Orleans. Residents of the Crescent City's poor neighborhoods were abandoned long before Hurricane Katrina, said Barack Obama, then a newly elected senator from Illinois, shortly after the storm hit. They've been abandoned again, judging by the city's sluggish pace of recovery. As presidential candidates returned to the Big Easy for anniversary photo opportunities, they found plenty of visibly bad news to use as backdrops. Across the Gulf Coast, you can tell which neighborhoods are recovering by how much household income they have.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 26, 1998
'State Fair'After creating the role on Broadway last year, John Davidson will once again don his overalls and plaid shirt to play Iowa farmer Abel Frake in Rodgers and Hammerstein's "State Fair" Tuesday through April 5 at the Lyric Opera House, 1405 Maryland Ave. The musical, set during the 1946 Iowa State Fair, reflects the kinder and gentler post-World War II era as it tells the story of a family's adventures at the fair and how it changes their lives....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Are you ready for some gumbo? At 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 3, when the Ravens take on the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII, much of Baltimore will be watching, either from their stadium seats in New Orleans or here at home. Ravens fans not lucky enough to have tickets to the big game still have plenty of reason to celebrate at home in Baltimore, and they can do so in N'awlins style. According to local chefs with Louisiana roots, the Big Easy's cuisine is tailor-made for parties.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The first thing you need to know about the Big Easy is that it was a lot easier to get here than the last time I visited New Orleans. Got a cheap flight into Jackson, Miss., and the difference in fare for driving a couple of hours paid for the rental car for the whole week and - if I can get a reservation - dinner at Emeril's restaurant in the warehouse district. My previous trip, in January 1976, was quite a bit more involved. I drove here from Southern California with two friends during winter break with the intention of visiting the Crescent City and then continuing on to Miami to scare up some tickets for Super Bowl X. For some reason, I can't possibly expect to remember, we decided to stay in New Orleans, probably because of all the great libraries.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Ravens fans are ready to rush New Orleans for Super Bowl XLVII, emptying their pockets for tickets to the big game and scrambling for a seat on an available flight. With travel packages going for thousands of dollars, you'll want to make your stay in the Big Easy well worth it — that means seeing something beyond the inside of the multimillion-dollar refurbished Mercedes-Benz Superdome. We've come up with 10 things for Baltimore travelers to see and do in New Orleans. Celebrate Mardi Gras It's true — there won't be any parades downtown during the Super Bowl, so mister can't throw you something.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
New Orleans may be the Big Easy, but for Ravens fans following their team to the Super Bowl next month, it's also likely to be a Big Expense. "I think we got the last hotel room in the city. It has a full two stars, and it's $600 a night," Ravens fan Neal Moorhouse said with a laugh. "Beggars can't be choosers. " Moorhouse, who wears a Mexican wrestler get-up to attend games as his alter ego, "Carne Cabeza," was among the fans who immediately started making travel arrangements to New Orleans for the Feb. 3 game once the Ravens won the AFC championship Sunday night.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | December 20, 2009
FAMILY The Harlem Globetrotters: Check out two of the stars of "The Amazing Race" - Big Easy and Flight Time - as they stop the frantic world travel and come home, to the basketball court at least. The game against the Washington Generals promises amazing dunks and plenty of feats of agility. Shows start at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday at the 1st Mariner Arena. Web: www.baltimorearena.com FILM 'Sherlock Holmes': Sherlock Holmes as a macho man? That's not so elementary, my dear Watson.
NEWS
April 11, 2009
On April 8, 2009, BIG EASY; devoted father of Dawn Tharp and her husband Scott; loving grandfather of Isabel and Joslyn; lifelong brother of Dan and Debi Shannahan; member of the National Alliance of Fat Boys since 1984 serving on the Board of Directors (for over 25 years) - gone, but never forgotten. Also survived by many dedicated friends. A service will be held at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Visiting hours on Saturday, 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Interment private.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | December 20, 2009
FAMILY The Harlem Globetrotters: Check out two of the stars of "The Amazing Race" - Big Easy and Flight Time - as they stop the frantic world travel and come home, to the basketball court at least. The game against the Washington Generals promises amazing dunks and plenty of feats of agility. Shows start at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday at the 1st Mariner Arena. Web: www.baltimorearena.com FILM 'Sherlock Holmes': Sherlock Holmes as a macho man? That's not so elementary, my dear Watson.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
Big Easy a treasure well worth restoring As a former resident of New Orleans, I am disgusted by Steve Chapman and by others who argue that New Orleans should not be rebuilt ("Why rebuild the Big Easy?" Opinion Commentary, Aug. 31). This discussion would not be happening if we were talking about Miami Beach or Hilton Head Island, S.C., or even Ocean City - all of which will be vulnerable as water levels rise. Is New Orleans worth saving? Yes. It is one of the country's unique cultural treasures.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | May 5, 2008
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- When Big Brown, the dominating Kentucky Derby champion, arrives in Baltimore in two weeks for the Preakness at Pimlico Race Course, he will find a cast of new challengers. Yesterday, all but one trainer of the other horses in the Derby field turned down an invitation to the middle jewel of the Triple Crown. Only Louie Roussel, who was pleased with the fifth-place finish of Recapturetheglory, said he is still considering the race. "[This morning], I will get in my car and either begin driving eight to 10 hours to Baltimore or eight to 10 hours home to New Orleans and take two weeks off," he said.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | October 18, 2007
NEW ORLEANS -- People here haul out multisyllable adjectives to describe the back-to-back storms that devastated Louisiana two years ago. Catastrophic, cataclysmic and apocalyptic are three of the favorites. Biblical is another. Touring New Orleans today, seeing barren lots where homes once stood and giant X's still marking houses to indicate if bodies were found, it is easy to think in those terms. But hurricanes Katrina and Rita did more than just destroy homes and histories. They seem to have changed Louisiana's personality.
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