Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBig Dreams
IN THE NEWS

Big Dreams

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | August 12, 1993
Bob Locke has turned away many small-business owners applying for loans. After 15 years in the banking business, he's turned away so many he's lost count."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
Ask Maurine E. Larkin what it was like when then-President George W. Bush visited her former school and heralded it as a success, and the newly hired principal at the Monarch Academy Public Charter School, squeals with delight. "Oh my God, it was like an out-of-body experience," Larkin said, recalling her return for a day to North Glen Elementary in Glen Burnie. "I walked down the hallways with [first lady] Laura [Bush], and I don't remember one thing I said. It was very, very exciting."
Advertisement
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 11, 2002
I MET Teiana Shannon yesterday at BBX, a spacious liquor and wine store off U.S. 40 in Edgewood, where people were handing over their money so fast you wondered if they were printing it up in their basements. Outside on the large digital message board, the words "Big Game jackpot $200 mill" flashed in the morning sun, causing motorists who saw it at the last minute to hit their brakes and screech into the parking lot on two wheels like something out of a Smokey and the Bandit movie. It was why Shannon, 22, a warehouse worker who lives in the area, was standing at the lottery machine now with nine bucks in her hands and all these dreams in her head.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
A sea of orange and black swept through Camden Yards yesterday afternoon as 78 men and women tried out to field errant balls during the Orioles' new season. Those chosen will be called ball boys and ball girls, but applicants could be no younger than 18 and the oldest was 51. "I'm a little nervous," said Chad Zuk, 21, a Dundalk electrician, who said he has attended every Opening Day with his grandfather since he was 4. After filling out an application in a basement room, it was out onto the field - a place one usually gets to only by way of a professional contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens | October 30, 2003
When your father was a legendary entertainer, how do you build a showbiz career for yourself? If you're singer/actress Cecilia Calloway -- one of five daughters born to Baltimore bandleader Cab Calloway -- you simply do what you love. "When I was very young, I went on the road with my dad, singing and dancing. I hated it," chuckles Calloway, who grew up in New York and currently lives in Columbia. "My life took a different turn, raising three children. But I missed entertaining. I am committed to doing this.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 2001
DUSHANBE, Tajikistan - The Tajik people went at each other for five years in a civil war that killed 60,000, and then they came up for air and decided they would prefer not to create another Afghanistan. So the fighting stopped. That is the story of post-Soviet Tajikistan, of a Central Asian country that borders Afghanistan, suffers from many of the same ills, and fears it may share the fate of its neighbor. A coalition government that encompassed all the contending enemies was formed in the mid-1990s.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1999
When he came to Columbia in 1970, the Rev. Gerald H. Goethe didn't expect to stay long.Then he became an executive at the Columbia Cooperative Ministry and helped start the famed interfaith centers in the Howard County town.He was pastor of the church that Columbia founder James W. Rouse attended and got swept up in the idealism that fueled the founding of the planned community.The farm boy turned peace and civil-rights activist never did go back to his native Midwest and never did become a veterinarian as his father, a dairy farmer, had hoped.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 14, 1995
She was unwed and pregnant as a teen-ager. In her 20s, she was a single mom who was unemployed and doing drugs in Los Angeles. As a thirtysomething, she took her eldest daughter out jTC of high school so they could sing together in roadhouses and smoky saloons.Let's give a great big happy Mother's Day hello to Naomi Judd, television's newest supermom and co-executive producer of NBC's "Naomi & Wynonna: Love Can Build a Bridge." The two-part, four-hour docudrama celebration of Naomi Judd's life starts tonight at 9 on WBAL (Channel 11)
FEATURES
By FROM LADIES' HOME JOURNAL Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 26, 1996
"I've had it," shouts Jillian, 34, an administrative assistant to a clothing designer. "It's bad enough that Billy won't take any responsibility in our marriage -- I've always done it all, from organizing our wedding to paying the bills -- but now he seems bent on destroying us outright. He's been gambling obsessively again."Jillian is convinced that if she could only get her husband to talk, they could work things out. "But in the four years we've been married," she explains, "he's slowly pulled away."
FEATURES
By Russell Smith and Russell Smith,Dallas Morning News | September 3, 1991
How is "Fame," the exuberant musical about gifted school kids, like "Midnight Express," the true story of a young American's harrowing experience in a Turkish prison? What do "Bugsy Malone," "Birdy" and "Pink Floyd: The Wall" have in common with "Angel Heart," "Mississippi Burning" and "Come See the Paradise"?The answer is Alan Parker, the British director whose eclectic bent has taken him, most recently, to "The Commitments," a lighthearted, music-filled comedy about the rise and fall of a working-class Irish soul band.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | August 18, 2008
Tennille Stokes started planning more than a year ahead of her wedding so that she wouldn't have to draw from her savings. She's nixed a limo, planned the ceremony and reception in one location and reduced her guest list from 250 to 100 - and even contemplated a smaller ceremony with only a dozen people at one point. "I don't need a lot of flowers, I don't need a big DJ," said the Northeast Baltimore resident, engaged since April, as she perused the exhibits at yesterday's Baltimore Bridal Show with maid of honor Tenille Ross.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to the Sun | October 5, 2007
Sara Cross Douglas creates dream homes. Her creations are decorated with the finest furnishings, and some have walls that contain hand-painted murals. On the outside are gazebos, elaborate gardens and fully stocked sheds. "My own house might be in disarray, but these houses don't have one item out of place," said the 78-year-old Timonium resident. "People would love to live in any of them." If they weren't less than 2 feet tall. The houses are miniature structures that Douglas creates and collects.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
Travis Robinson, 10 years old and perched in the front seat of a police car, had a few questions for his partner for the day, Baltimore police Officer Ron Starr. What are the switches for? Do you work a night or day shift? Do you like doughnuts? Why are we stopping? ... We're police! Then they were off, lights flashing, to the modern-day North Pole, also known as Wal-Mart. Travis' big dreams - world peace and a PlayStation Portable - weren't in the cards, but Starr was hoping to make a few of his young charge's less formidable Christmas wishes come true.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2004
In the hospital of the future, doctors may harvest stem cells from an ailing patient's heart, grow 10 million or so in a dish and return them to the heart to regenerate dead muscle. Yesterday, doctors from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions talked glowingly about how revolutionary therapies like this will be delivered in a Heart Institute scheduled to open in 2008. And they had reason to glow. Against the purple backdrop of M&T Bank Stadium, hospital officials thanked former Ravens owner Art Modell for agreeing to head the governing board of the Johns Hopkins Heart Institute.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2004
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - In every collective endeavor, there will be those who believe and those who need proof. In the case of the South Caroline (County) Little League team that has advanced to this weekend's World Series, count Hunter Bennett among the skeptical. Oh sure, this group of 11- and 12-year-olds had won a state title two years ago, but getting to the World Series seemed problematical for Hunter, who just happens to be the second baseman. "I thought we could win, but we had a lot of big heads that thought we were already going to win states," said Hunter.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
ATHENS - A few miles into the drive from the airport to downtown, the image of the elite swimmer looms on several billboards. Michael Phelps? No, Ian Thorpe. When the American swim team returned to Greece yesterday after six days of training in Spain, Phelps got a reminder of the individual and the nation that stand between him and Olympic history. Phelps is the hottest swimmer in the world, but Thorpe still carries enough weight to have adidas drop considerable coin using him to promote its brand.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
Travis Robinson, 10 years old and perched in the front seat of a police car, had a few questions for his partner for the day, Baltimore police Officer Ron Starr. What are the switches for? Do you work a night or day shift? Do you like doughnuts? Why are we stopping? ... We're police! Then they were off, lights flashing, to the modern-day North Pole, also known as Wal-Mart. Travis' big dreams - world peace and a PlayStation Portable - weren't in the cards, but Starr was hoping to make a few of his young charge's less formidable Christmas wishes come true.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1994
FREDERICK -- They are united by their common love of the game and separated by their disparate talents and goals.Some players in the Atlantic Basketball Association still have big dreams -- of the glamour, fortune and status attached to careers in the NBA.Others have more modest aims -- to stay in shape and to supplement their incomes with the $60 to $80 per game pay, plus fringe benefits such as insurance and workmen's compensation.Many teams play in drafty high school gyms with poor lighting, and crowds often can be counted by hand.
SPORTS
By Ryan Young and Ryan Young,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
In time, Salome Devidze hopes to be among the top 20 women's tennis players in the world, competing for big prize money on the sport's grandest stages. In time. This week, the 18-year-old is in Baltimore for the Holabird Sports 10K, a United States Tennis Association satellite tournament at Druid Hill Park, where the top prize is less than $2,000 and at times the cheering section yesterday consisted only of her mother. It's a start. But considering the alternative, the setting is just fine with Devidze, the tournament's No. 3 seed, who has been playing tennis since she was 6. Without a chance encounter almost a decade ago, she wouldn't even be in Baltimore this week.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
Like the old Seinfeld show, the story of nanotubes is a story about nothing. Or nearly nothing. To the naked eye, a vial of nanotubes looks like a fine black powder, the sort of stuff you can wipe off the disks of your car's brakes. "It's basically soot," said Peter J. Burke, a researcher at the University of California at Irvine. In fact, nanotubes are tiny carbon molecules with astonishing strength and lightness, electrical conductivity, heat conductivity and sharpness. Since nanotubes were discovered in 1991, their boosters have promised a revolution in products, including high-strength aircraft parts, faster computers, more powerful batteries, cheaper and more efficient video displays and lights, better fuel cells and disposable chemical and biological sensors.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.