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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 5, 1992
There are people, most of them well into their 60s and 70s b now, who grew up in neighborhoods that no longer exist. There are probably thousands of them around Baltimore. I've met a few along the way.The East Street gang had reunions, celebrating their wonderful life as kids in a vibrant immigrant neighborhood that urban renewal wiped away years ago. They all had vivid memories and funny stories about the people on their street, near Belair Market. One of them even remembered the exact conditions for buying a bicycle on the "put-away plan" at a neighborhood department store.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
It is a chilling tale of winter, one that in ghost-story fashion begins with a sign that all is not right. Maybe there's a damp spot spreading ominously across a wall, or faint sounds that grow louder and more insistent. "I heard water dripping," Liz Simon-Higgs of Baltimore said, "but mostly what I heard was my water meter spinning. " Similarly, Kacey Gaige heard the tell-tale sound of water on the move in her Severna Park home, "but I wasn't running the laundry. " As she headed into her garage to pick her kids up at school Thursday, the source of the mystery sound was revealed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 15, 1993
Friends like Peter's might compel a cynic to say: Give loneliness a chance.A British-American "dramady" opening today at the Charles for three weeks, "Peter's Friends" is a blend of shticky American show-biz humor and treacly Brit melodrama. It's "Masterpiece Theater" as written by Shecky Greene.Not far from the truth, actually: It's the work of co-writers (and co-stars and co-producers and co-spouses) Rita Rudner (American comic) and her husband Martin Bergman (British producer). I'm only guessing, but I'd bet the Bergmans have seen "The Big Chill" more than once.
NEWS
February 16, 2005
THESE ARE sad days for those of us who cherish the First Amendment. It was bad enough when, in a moment of unrestrained hubris, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. decided last fall he could pick and choose who is worthy of access to state government information and who is not. On Monday, U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr. gave this foolish and undemocratic notion a legitimacy it never deserved. By dismissing this newspaper's lawsuit against Mr. Ehrlich, Judge Quarles has unleashed the potential for all manner of petty despotism upon the electorate.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 24, 1994
Iknow it happens all the time -- and, in this case, the complainant knew he shouldn't have parked his car where he did. But it's still an outrage. I'm speaking here of what towing companies charge people to get their impounded cars back. Rafik Agri, a college student who lives in South Baltimore, couldn't find a place to park his car one recent night. Nor could his roommate. So they both parked their cars in a private lot -- not smart -- across the street from their rowhouse. It wasn't long before a tow truck arrived.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 8, 1998
Test screenings. A huge marketing campaign with endless commercial tie-ins. A major release onto 1,000-plus screens nationwide.All this for a 60-year-old film that is already one of the best-known, best-loved and most-seen of all time: "The Wizard of Oz."It's the latest and most spectacular example of Hollywood studios rummaging through their vaults and re-releasing classics - or what they think might be classics. Along with 1939's "Oz," 1983's "The Big Chill," the comedy-drama about a reunion of '60s radicals turned yuppies, returned to theaters this past weekend.
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,The Hartford Courant | January 16, 1992
NEW YORK -- Kevin Kline is being a good guy again.It's a role the actor has played before, most notably in 1983's "The Big Chill," in which he portrayed a successful businessman and unofficial patriarch of a small circle of old college friends.In subsequent years, his roles have had much more panache, ranging from the caustic cowboy in "Silverado," to an insatiable Italian pizza maker in "I Love You to Death," to his Oscar-winning performance as Otto West, the profoundly stupid crook, in "A Fish Called Wanda."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 2, 1993
PETER'S FRIENDS(HBO, rated R, 1992)Kenneth Branagh has burst into the upper echelons of the international cinematic scene in the past few years with an encouraging sense of intellectual and creative freshness in his films "Henry V," "Dead Again" and "Much Ado About Nothing."For most of his films, he also writes, directs and co-stars with his wife, Emma Thompson. Such is the case with "Peter's Friends," which he produced and directed and stars in, as a cynical American sitcom writer named Andrew who is unhappily married to a self-absorbed sitcom star named Carol (comic Rita Rudner)
FEATURES
By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 6, 1992
Last weekend, Lawrence Kasdan flew into Philadelphia from Paris, where he'd attended the French opening of "Grand Canyon." Immediately before that, he was in Berlin, where his ensemble drama about angst and anxiety among a disparate group of Los Angelenos won the Berlin International Film Festival's top prize, the Golden Bear."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler THEATER The love of money | January 18, 1992
MUSICPianist to perform LisztDaniel Blumenthal ranks among the best French pianists, and his Liszt playing is particularly prized. Tomorrow at 3 p.m. he will join the Maryland Symphony Orchestra and its music director, Barry Tuckwell, in works by that composer and by George Gershwin. The concert will take place in Hagerstown's Maryland Theater (21 S. Potomac St.) Call (301) 790-2000 for details.Moliere's comedy classic, "The Miser," with a new translation by Albert Bermel, is currently on stage at the Vagabond Theatre.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
His work is up for an Academy Award for the 17th time, but today, Gary LeMel seems more interested in Baltimore than in the prospect of winning a second gold statue. "I haven't spent much time here," says the head of worldwide music for Warner Bros. films as he strides through Mount Vernon on a recent windy afternoon. "But I've worked with [director] Barry Levinson many times. I can see why he loves it here. What a sense of history." You might say the same of LeMel, a 57-year-old who is to movie soundtracks what the Washington Monument is to the local scenery - a landmark still in the middle of the action.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2002
Has this summer's heat made you contemplate giving up food altogether rather than cooking over a hot stove? Do you want to come home at night and collapse because the humidity has robbed you of your energy and appetite? There's hope, folks. Cold soup. It may sound odd at first blush, but cold tomato soup - gazpacho - has been cooling off sweltering Spaniards for years. These days, cold soups are made several different ways with a myriad of vegetable combinations. They are tasty, refreshing and, with good bread and cheese, they easily make a summer lunch or dinner.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
As concern grows over forecasts of possible fuel shortages, Maryland residents are rushing to lock in natural gas contracts and stock up on heating oil, as fuel companies brace their customers for what will be inevitable price increases in home heating bills this winter. Prices on the wholesale market have fluctuated rapidly since early this year, with the cost of heating oil soaring 70 percent higher and natural gas 60 percent over a year ago. The problem is expected to get worse, especially if Mother Nature wallops the Northeast with a harsh, cold season, according to industry experts and market analysts.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 8, 1998
Test screenings. A huge marketing campaign with endless commercial tie-ins. A major release onto 1,000-plus screens nationwide.All this for a 60-year-old film that is already one of the best-known, best-loved and most-seen of all time: "The Wizard of Oz."It's the latest and most spectacular example of Hollywood studios rummaging through their vaults and re-releasing classics - or what they think might be classics. Along with 1939's "Oz," 1983's "The Big Chill," the comedy-drama about a reunion of '60s radicals turned yuppies, returned to theaters this past weekend.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1998
The rain is coming down in sheets and the sky over Glen Burnie is the color of boiled cabbage, but you don't care.A hundred yards up Ritchie Highway, a late-model Honda Civic has hydroplaned into a Ford Taurus and the Taurus looks like it might be in the body shop until the Al Gore presidency, but you don't care about that, either. In fact, you don't care much about anything right now, because you're inside the vast, quiet, cocoon-like elegance of the La-Z-Boy Furniture Gallery, your body melted into a recliner so comfortable it may take a cattle prod to get you out of this baby.
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 27, 1997
The rain started coming down at 7 a.m. while we boarded the Spirit of Adventure, a 250-passenger excursion boat docked outside the Glacier Bay Lodge in Gustavus, Alaska.Most people see Glacier Bay National Park from seagoing vessels. As the name of the park indicates, it surrounds a bay rife with glaciers -- 16 in all and the main attraction -- a water world scooped out between Canada's Yukon Territory and Alaska's St. Elias/Fairweather Range.We joked about that while we waited in line on a slippery boat-side catwalk.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | June 7, 1996
THERE WERE bright lights, lots of action and cameras rolling at Jasper's Restaurant last Saturday night, where the wedding of the last of the "Diner Guys" was being celebrated and filmed. Yep, the most famous Diner Guy of all, film director Barry Levinson, came home to capture the party for newlyweds Chip and Renee Silverman.For nearly six years, Levinson has been filming different segments of his "Diner" pals' lives, for (perhaps) a coming documentary, "Where are the Diner Guys?" During those years, he and his film crew have gone to camp several times with them, invited wives and girlfriends to a party in a diner and attended birthday and wedding celebrations.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
His work is up for an Academy Award for the 17th time, but today, Gary LeMel seems more interested in Baltimore than in the prospect of winning a second gold statue. "I haven't spent much time here," says the head of worldwide music for Warner Bros. films as he strides through Mount Vernon on a recent windy afternoon. "But I've worked with [director] Barry Levinson many times. I can see why he loves it here. What a sense of history." You might say the same of LeMel, a 57-year-old who is to movie soundtracks what the Washington Monument is to the local scenery - a landmark still in the middle of the action.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1997
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- Twenty-nine years after they won the famed "Ice Bowl" on frozen Lambeau Field, the Green Bay Packers will try to re-create a chapter from their storied past.When the Packers beat the Dallas Cowboys, 21-17, on Dec. 31, 1967, in temperatures that hit 16-below zero in the NFL championship game, it propelled them into Super Bowl II. Two weeks later, they hammered the AFL's Oakland Raiders, 33-14, to finish as champions for the third straight year.Things haven't been the same in Green Bay since.
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