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By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 26, 1991
There's still time before Labor Day to squeeze in a little summer reading. If you bring a small-business book along with you on your weekend getaway, you won't feel so guilty about taking time off.If you are an entrepreneur looking for homespun humor and inspiration, check out "In Business for Yourself," by Bruce Williams with Warren Sloat (Scarborough House, $19.95).Williams, a popular radio host, owns several businesses. He fills the book with his own experiences to help novice business owners cope with all the problems they face.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 22, 2014
Is there a way to actually unite economic populists on the liberal left and libertarian right? Maybe not. But one promising possibility is the prioritization of American small businesses over powerful, multinational corporate dominance. The events of September 29, 2008, certainly provided a brief glimmer of hope that a hybrid ideological alliance might push back against big business. That day, the U.S. House of Representatives stunned Washington and Wall Street by rejecting the Bush Administration's $700 billion bank bailout, 228 to 205. The Dow Jones Industrial index fell 778 points in a single afternoon, a 7 percent drop.
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NEWS
August 10, 2011
The organized voice of "big business" uses the term "small business" to represent its own interests when it comes to government regulation Critics of federal regulation often hide behind the claim of protecting small businesses ("Too many rules," Aug. 4). Yet these critics fail to understand the needs of most small businesses - the 98 percent of all U.S. businesses with fewer than 20 employees. It's a case of the organized voice of "big business" using the term "small business" to represent its interests.
NEWS
By David Horsey | June 10, 2014
I'm sure the insurgent conservatives who call themselves the tea party, the folks who have rocked the Republican Partyand pushed the country's agenda to the right, are perfectly nice people. They are good to their grandkids and don't kick their dogs. And I think they genuinely care about their country. What I wonder about, though, is whether they really understand who it is that they are supporting. They claim to represent the interest of average Americans -- the upright, hard-working men and women who pay the taxes, rear the next generation and struggle to make ends meet.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 14, 2010
The Internal Revenue Service has plenty of resources to hassle Lori Proctor. So it claimed the Bryantown resident improperly deducted tuition for a master's degree in business administration on her 2005 income tax return. But the IRS seems too busy to go after corporate tax cheats. The agency time spent auditing big business has plunged 33 percent since 2005, a "startling" decline, says a research group at Syracuse University. It's the Willie Sutton strategy in reverse.
NEWS
By David Horsey | June 10, 2014
I'm sure the insurgent conservatives who call themselves the tea party, the folks who have rocked the Republican Partyand pushed the country's agenda to the right, are perfectly nice people. They are good to their grandkids and don't kick their dogs. And I think they genuinely care about their country. What I wonder about, though, is whether they really understand who it is that they are supporting. They claim to represent the interest of average Americans -- the upright, hard-working men and women who pay the taxes, rear the next generation and struggle to make ends meet.
NEWS
August 9, 2011
In reference to your recent op-ed piece on the vandalism perpetrated against several Chicago-area funeral homes last month ("Big Labor shows its ugly side," Aug. 8), I would suggest some perspective is in order. Flunkies from Big Business almost shut down the United States government. Flunkies from Big Labor vandalized three funeral homes in Chicago. Toenail fungus is ugly but cancer will kill you. David Ingalls, Severna Park
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 25, 1993
I am not surprised that the tobacco industry is suing the federal government to overturn its finding that secondhand smoke causes lung cancer.Smoke is probably good for you.It probably gives you cleaner breath and whiter teeth, adds 50 points to your IQ and makes you a sexual dynamo.At least that fits the profile of most smokers I know.The National Candy Council, by the way, would like everybody to know that sugar does not cause tooth decay. And the National Alcohol Council wants the government to stop lying about booze:The more you drink, the more suave you act, the better sense you make and the better reaction time you have behind the wheel of a car.And people who disagree with any of these things are going to get the pants sued off of them!
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1997
LONDON -- The new government of Prime Minister Tony Blair gained passage of its first budget in Parliament yesterday, giving top priority to a tax cut that will give British big business the lowest tax rate of any Western industrialized state.In that way, business was reassured by the governing Labor Party that it would remain the locomotive of an expanding economy, while the middle class waits for tax relief and the working class fares only a little better.Indeed, many people will find they are paying more in indirect taxes under the new budget and getting less in tax relief for things like mortgage payments.
NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2001
MARANA, Ariz. - Stars flicker high above the Sonoran Desert on a winter night. The tangy whiff of a mesquite campfire hangs in the frigid air. In the distance, a lone coyote calls and from the foothills comes an answering yip. Huddled together, Clif and Betty Santa prepare for another night camping out. After cleaning the microwave, turning off the TV and shifting the clothes from the washer to the dryer, Betty steps out of the 39-foot Newmar Diesel RV...
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Harry Hughes, who worked longer as a lobbyist for big business than as Maryland's governor, has endorsed Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in this year's gubernatorial primary. That is probably honest, since Mr. Brown seems to be strongly pro-business. But it does not sound like much of a recommendation: Most of the things that have worked out well for big business have not worked out so well for the rest of us. The governor is supposed to be committed to the long-term good of the state, not to anybody's short-term interests.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORTS | April 25, 2014
One of the busiest Saturdays of the spring is coming up in Harford County on April 26, featuring four events many people have taken to marking their calendars for each year. Walk A Mile in Her Shoes in Bel Air, Clear Your Clutter Day at Harford Community College, River Sweep on both shores of the Susquehanna River and the Harford Earth Day Celebration in Aberdeen are activities that put service and helping others at the forefront, while at the same time giving participants a chance to have a little fun. Walk a Mile in Her Shoes To coincide with National Sexual Assault Awareness Month in April, Harford County-based non-profit SARC will host its sixth annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes: The International Men's March to Stop Rape, Sexual Assault & Gender Violence on Saturday in downtown Bel Air. The event has a goal of raising $50,000 to support SARC, which provides hope and resources for victims of domestic violence, sexual violence and stalking.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
There are many failed policies, yet the federal, state and local governments are always reluctant to pull the plug on their failures ( "Pot fears expose fears about societal health," Feb. 27). Jack Welch, former chairman and CEO of General Electric, arguably one of the greatest leaders of big business ever, admits that GE made many errors on projects - after significant time, money and technology had been invested and then decided to pull the plug because it made sense not to continue on a negative path.
NEWS
December 7, 2013
I, for one, am thankful that PETA has revealed how my tax dollars are squandered on ridiculous sex experiments on rodents right in my backyard ("PETA attacks animal research for sexual health issues," Dec. 3). It's ironic that Johns Hopkins claims to "take care" of their animals, when in fact they intentionally mutilate their genitals and kill all of them in these horrible experiments. I know that erectile dysfunction is big business, but an institution like the National Institutes of Health should not be funding something like this when they don't have enough money to fund research that can actually save lives.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | January 30, 2013
Soon after President Barack Obama's second inaugural address, Speaker of the House John Boehner said the White House would try "to annihilate the Republican Party" and "shove us into the dustbin of history. " Actually, the GOP is doing a pretty good job annihilating itself. As Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal put it, Republicans need to "stop being the stupid party. " The GOP crack-up was probably inevitable. Inconsistencies and tensions within the GOP have been growing for years -- ever since Ronald Reagan put together the coalition that became the modern Republican Party.
EXPLORE
December 30, 2012
Editor, After reading recent letters to the editor from Democrats, including President of the Young Democrats of Harford County Tom Myers, I felt compelled to respond to the Obama rhetoric. Mr. Myers says that "a majority of the country...supports...the policies of President Obama," but that doesn't tell the whole story. The truth is that many are dependent on government benefits. Mr. Obama has done a masterful job of creating that condition through the stimulus, large increases of the number of people on food stamps, nationalized health care, federal funding of abortion and on and on. He has effectively created a coalition of voters wedded to the Democratic Party.
BUSINESS
By Bob Erle and Bob Erle,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2005
It used to be when homeowners had a leaky window or broken fence, they'd go to the garage, grab their tools and get to work. But as homes become more and more complicated and people's lives busier, homeowners are increasingly turning to handymen for repairs. Because of the surge in the remodeling industry and skyrocketing home prices that have owners looking to protect their biggest investment, the handyman field is becoming big business. The independent handyman - the "Chuck in the truck" who carries his own tools, answers his own phone and schedules his own jobs - increasingly is competing with rivals who work for national chains, wear uniforms and are dispatched by an administrative staffs.
TRAVEL
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2011
The infestation has only just begun. There were only a few of them on Ocean City's boardwalk Thursday night, but within a week, the incident reports will start to spike, and so will the alcohol citations for minors. Buses will become crowded again. Traffic will swell with unreliable drivers. The June bugs will have arrived. An average of 4 million people come to this resort town every year — an estimated 200,000-250,000 this past Memorial Day weekend — but the crowd that local businesses and the town brace themselves for are the graduating high school seniors who, in a ritual exercise in excess, take over for several weeks in June.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
In the wake of Mitt Romney's loss to President Barack Obama, many in the Republican Party are soul-searching, to determine where their man went wrong in his attempt to attract a majority of voters. Was it because he was stiff and un-relatable or because he seemed willing to take any position to get elected? Or that he should not have attempted to coast over the finish line after a strong first debate performance? One key area being examined is why Republicans nominated a candidate from big business as the nation was trying to recover from a recession that many think was brought on largely by the excesses of big business (i.e.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
In Sparrows Point, bankrupt RG Steel's delinquent city water bills have risen from about $3.5 million in 2009 to nearly $7 million today, according to city records. Chemical giant W.R.Grace & Co. owes almost $500,000 - even after recently agreeing to pay $2.2 million on a long-overdue bill. And the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore - a nonprofit that gets funding from the city and state - has an unpaid bill of more than $135,000. As Baltimore moved to take the homes of hundreds of city residents for unpaid water bills as small as $350, the city water system allowed some big businesses, nonprofits and government offices to run up delinquent accounts totaling more than $10 million, a review by The Baltimore Sun has found.
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