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By Brenda Harkins | April 11, 2012
I had this trouble with "Glee" over the break, where I couldn't seem to contain within my brain that Quinn got T-boned and Rachel almost got married at the same time, and thus kept forgetting one or the other. So I was extra confused when Quinn showed up all blonde and perky and wheelchair-bound. And it was only partly because that's NOT how spinal injuries work. Which … have you ever had that troubling thing happen where your real life interferes with guilty pleasure TV life? I have that a lot with medical dramas where I'm all, “For love of all that is holy, why is your long, flowing hair LOOSE while you are doing SURGERY?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2014
I am not a Washington Redskins fan; quite the contrary - I worked there in 1999-2000 and had a very negative experience. Yet what is happening with the protests over the team's name is a disturbing example of what can happen when certain members of the media make a determination and government oversteps its bounds ( "Redskins name controversy heats up with federal cancellation of trademark," June 18). The one issue that nobody wants to raise is that the vast majority of those who are offended by the name are not Native American - the one group that is supposed to be offended.
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SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
The relationship between Michael Oher and Sean Tuohy Jr. has - like Tuohy himself - grown dramatically in the 10 years since Oher was brought by Tuohy's family into their home in the leafy suburbs of Memphis. If those early years became the genesis of a best-selling book and a hit movie that documented Oher's transformation into a college football star at Mississippi and the No. 1 pick of the Ravens in 2009, this year takes the brothers' relationship to another place. In Baltimore, call it The Other Side.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A group of young men at Howard Community College are giving new meaning to the Orwellian phrase, "Big Brother is watching you. " They are members of the community college's leadership program Howard PRIDE (Purpose, Respect, Initiative, Determination, Excellence), and their designated Big Brother is Steven Freeman, the program's assistant director. To say they relish his watchful eye is an understatement. What began as a pilot program three years ago offering math support to boost graduation rates among African-American males has become a resource and mentoring tool for any Howard Community College male of color.
NEWS
July 21, 2010
Re your editorial, "Smart meters, Redux" (July 18): Yes, the concept is smart--for the utility company, which will charge consumers even more than they already do (and get undeserved and unnecessary stimulus funds to boot). Hasn't The Baltimore Sun heard about the dismal reports in California, where the new meters didn't work properly and consumers were overcharged? BGE has been consistently raising rates already, and I don't care to pay more for a Big Brother system I don't even want.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
I'm a bit late, but I would like to lend my support to Melvin A. Goodman for his commentary regarding whistle-blowers ("We need more whistle-blowers," June 23). Whistle-blowers can make contributions toward better government. But now our government is making it too dangerous for most people to even think of doing this; we have become fearful of the consequences of criticizing our own government. "Dissent is patriotic" is to some degree no longer tolerated. I have recently heard that sales of George Orwell's "1984," in which "Big Brother" is constantly watching, have soared.
NEWS
By David Horsey | June 18, 2013
In principle, the National Security Agency's vast data collection operation is troubling, but in the age of Google and Facebook, it feels like having just one more Big Brother in a growing family of Big Brothers. In response to the revelation that the NSA is scooping up metadata on every call placed on Verizon, the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit against chief members of the Obama administration's national security team. The ACLU's deputy legal director, Jameel Jaffer, said: "This dragnet program is surely one of the largest surveillance efforts ever launched by a democratic government against its own citizens.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
I am not a Washington Redskins fan; quite the contrary - I worked there in 1999-2000 and had a very negative experience. Yet what is happening with the protests over the team's name is a disturbing example of what can happen when certain members of the media make a determination and government oversteps its bounds ( "Redskins name controversy heats up with federal cancellation of trademark," June 18). The one issue that nobody wants to raise is that the vast majority of those who are offended by the name are not Native American - the one group that is supposed to be offended.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
THE U.S. IMMIGRATION and Naturalization Service, historically a laggard in tracking the nearly 1 million foreigners with American student visas, now has the opportunity to do so efficiently - if it can resist playing Big Brother. Yesterday, the INS formally introduced a $37 million tracking system that requires thousands of colleges, universities and trade schools to submit data on foreign students, what they're studying, how long they've been in the United States and when their visas expire.
NEWS
August 23, 1991
Is Big Brother running amok via the computer? The saga of Proctor & Gamble versus the Wall Street Journal has us wondering. In June, the Journal ran two stories on the forced resignation of P&G's food products chief. Four days after the second story, P&G called in the cops.It didn't hurt that one P&G part-timer was a police detective; he headed the probe. Prosecutors issued subpoenas for files on 803,849 phones in Ohio and Kentucky to trace 40 million long-distance calls. Probers were looking for calls to the Journal's Pittsburgh bureau, its fax machine and the home of a reporter to find her sources.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Every now and then something happens that makes me realize how difficult those tween years are for kids. They're no longer little kids and they aren't quite teens. Halloween provided a painful reminder of that at my house. The high school senior had decided to throw a party and for days he was decorating, drawing up the menu and texting his invitations. I, too, was preoccupied with plans for the teen invasion. A few times I asked my tween what he wanted to do for Halloween, but he gave me no response.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
I'm a bit late, but I would like to lend my support to Melvin A. Goodman for his commentary regarding whistle-blowers ("We need more whistle-blowers," June 23). Whistle-blowers can make contributions toward better government. But now our government is making it too dangerous for most people to even think of doing this; we have become fearful of the consequences of criticizing our own government. "Dissent is patriotic" is to some degree no longer tolerated. I have recently heard that sales of George Orwell's "1984," in which "Big Brother" is constantly watching, have soared.
NEWS
By David Horsey | June 18, 2013
In principle, the National Security Agency's vast data collection operation is troubling, but in the age of Google and Facebook, it feels like having just one more Big Brother in a growing family of Big Brothers. In response to the revelation that the NSA is scooping up metadata on every call placed on Verizon, the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit against chief members of the Obama administration's national security team. The ACLU's deputy legal director, Jameel Jaffer, said: "This dragnet program is surely one of the largest surveillance efforts ever launched by a democratic government against its own citizens.
NEWS
June 8, 2013
For years, I've been super cautious about my phone calls. I avoid e-mail as much as possible and eschew Facebook and social media. I've nothing to hide, but the thought of the National Security Agency (among others) spying on my day-to-day communications is just sickening ("NSA collects Verizon records of U.S. callers," June 6). This latest news is horrific. Privacy is dead. We have sacrificed our freedom for so-called "security. " Because of cloud computing and NSA's massive, nationwide facilities, data storage is infinite and long lasting.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 8, 2013
Every time I drive between Baltimore and Washington and come upon those big, spooky National Security Agency buildings in Fort Meade, I have cinematic thoughts about what goes on inside. I imagine the best and brightest of surveillance nerds spying on nuclear activity in Iran, on terrorist training camps in Yemen, on Kim Jong-un's playroom in North Korea. I also assume they're watching me as I drive along Route 32, taking my picture and running it through face-recognition software, recording the license plate on my car. If there's a cellphone in use, they're probably listening to the conversation, too. But wait.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
In the Salisbury-Stevenson rivalry that has bordered on something akin to the dislike waged by the Hatfields and McCoys, there usually isn't room for ambiguity. You're usually rooting for one team or the other. That's what makes Wednesday night's showdown between the former Capital Athletic Conference rivals difficult for Chris and Brady Dashiell. Chris Dashiell is a junior midfielder-converted-to-attackman who starts for the No. 3 Mustangs (9-1). Brady Dashiell is a freshman attackman-converted-to-midfielder who plays significant minutes for the No. 6 Sea Gulls (10-2)
NEWS
By Howard Kleinberg | May 1, 1995
EMERGING FROM the horror of Oklahoma City is the realization that Big Brother, indeed, is watching. Despite the assistance that surveillance cameras have afforded law enforcement people in the bombing case, there needs to be a concern as to how far this technology will take us.Psychoanalyst Erich Fromm warned more than 40 years ago of a society dominated by technology. He used the phrase "negative utopia" in describing the government-dominated societies fantasized in writing by men such as Orwell and Aldous Huxley.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton,M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton,M.D.,new york times special features | February 28, 1999
Q. My grandson is 2 1/2 years old and extremely bright, but he cannot get to sleep by himself. He sleeps in a futon bed and needs his mother's presence in his bed to fall asleep at night. He seems to have fixated on this security instead of the usual stuffed animal or blanket. At nap time, his mother has been driving him around until he falls asleep.My daughter needs to know how to turn this around. Would getting him a youth bed -- big enough only for him -- work? The problem is compounded now because of the arrival of a little brother.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Coach Don Zimmerman estimates that between 20 and 30 pairs of brothers have played lacrosse for UMBC. But remarkably, the latest set hadn't played on the same team until they suited up for the Retrievers. Not at St. Mary's in Annapolis, where Arnold natives Neill and Nate Lewnes spent their high school years. Not in a variety of youth and rec leagues. Not even in games with their neighborhood friends. "I had never played with him," said Nate Lewnes, who has earned a starting role on attack as a freshman.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 14, 2013
A Texas judge has ruled that a student's religious freedom is not violated by her high school's requirement that all students wear ID cards with embedded chips. Her claim - that the ID card bore "the mark of the beast" referenced in the Book of Revelations in the Bible - was bizarre. But it appears to be a rare bit of pushback by students or parents against an Orwellian tracking system that gives me goose bumps. In Texas, funding for schools is tied to daily attendance, and badges with chips or bar codes give a more accurate head count (especially in high schools where students have more freedom of movement)
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