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NEWS
October 11, 2012
A recent editorial states that the Corporation for Public Broadcasting "gets all of $450 million" in federal funding, as if this amount were peanuts ("Big lies and Big Bird," Oct 8). But $450 million could hire 9,000 teachers at $50,000 per year. Surely, 9,000 teachers, instructing about 30 kids each, for six hours per day, could do a lot more good than Big Bird could with kids watching a TV screen for an hour every day. Sal D'Avella, Sykesville
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
From many little yellow peeps, one artistic family saw a giant yellow bird. At the sixth annual "Peep Show" in downtown Westminster, the massive 3,810-marshmallow-strong Big Bird drew the biggest oohs and ahhs among the young kids and older fans who filled the Carroll County Arts Council building on Main Street Saturday, all there to take in a host of candy-inspired creations. The "Long Live Sesame Peep" display, complete with a trash-canned Oscar the Grouch, was created by Robert Mondor and his family - wife Ann, son Sean, 10, and daughter Lauren, 8, all of Westminster - and was just one of many pop-culture-inspired displays at the Easter event, which has become a major fundraiser for the council each year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | November 8, 2012
John Shields hosts a Maryland Public Television Appreciation evening at Gertrude's Thursday night. The restaurant will donate 33 percent of its evening's sale to MPT. Reservations are advised. Also, beginning Nov. 10, Gertrude's will now open for brunch on Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m., one half hour earlier than it had been opening. Follow Baltimore Diner on Twitter @gorelickingood
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | November 8, 2012
John Shields hosts a Maryland Public Television Appreciation evening at Gertrude's Thursday night. The restaurant will donate 33 percent of its evening's sale to MPT. Reservations are advised. Also, beginning Nov. 10, Gertrude's will now open for brunch on Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m., one half hour earlier than it had been opening. Follow Baltimore Diner on Twitter @gorelickingood
NEWS
October 11, 2012
Seems to me that philanthropist George Soros could pitch in and save Big Bird instead of helping President Obama reach his $1 billion campaign donation goal ("Big lies and Big Bird," Oct. 8). As far as "big lies" goes, what Mr. Romney is saying is no worse than what candidate Obama said in calling President George W. Bush "unpatriotic and irresponsible" for adding to the deficit. It's funny, too, that Mr. Romney's plan sounds like Gov. Martin O'Malley's holding the tax-rate the same but changing deductions and exemptions for higher-salaried folks.
NEWS
By David Horsey | October 11, 2012
Mitt Romney may have won the first presidential debate, but what stuck in many people's minds was his threat to fire Big Bird. Apparently, Mr. Romney thinks America's debt problem can be fixed by picking up pennies along Sesame Street. Pressed to explain how he would balance the federal budget while cutting trillions of dollars in taxes, the allegedly masterful debater offered up just two specifics: He would repeal "Obamacare" (even though the Congressional Budget Office says the health care act actually reduces deficit spending)
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - They're coming after Big Bird again. And Arthur, Reading Rainbow, Dragon Tales, Between the Lions, Postcards from Buster and Clifford the Big Red Dog. If you thought you saw a quiet end to the battle to "defund" public television and radio 10 years ago, guess again. The culture warlords are back, draped this time in a rather tattered and faded cloak of fiscal responsibility. A House subcommittee endorsed a proposal Thursday to make the biggest cuts in public broadcasting since Congress created the nonprofit Corporation for Public Broadcasting in 1967.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | November 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As budget conferees huddle in back rooms, it is clear that Big Bird has survived the ax. The idea that Republicans would consider tampering with subsidies to ''Sesame Street'' was greeted in the nation's editorial pages and TV studios as evidence that the Hottentots had arrived.Leaving aside arguments about the proper scope of the federal government, Kay Hymowitz, writing in the Autumn edition of the City Journal, argues that ''Sesame Street'' does not deserve its status as educational icon.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 26, 1991
ON AND OF THE AIR:* Do you ever wish in the rush of modern life you could be, oh, 6 years old again? That's the perpetual age of Big Bird, the "Sesame Street" regular who's preparing to celebrate a prime-time birthday next month on PBS.Although the daily show is in its 21st year (at 7:30 and 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. on channels 22 and 67), Big Bird remains 6 to allow young viewers to identify. And "Big Bird's Birthday: Let Me Eat Cake" airs at 8 p.m. Monday, March 11.In preparation, Maryland Public Television and Baltimore County public libraries are sponsoring a contest that offers youngsters a chance to attend a pre-birthday bash at MPT studios in Owings Mills at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 9. And next Monday, March 4, is the entry deadline.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 15, 1995
Buried deep in an addendum to the Republican "Contract with America" is a pledge to cut more than $500 million from "all arts and humanities funding" in America in the next five years.And Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich wants to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, among others.But I have a feeling that when all the huffing and puffing is over, Big Bird and Barney will continue to get funded.The NEA, however, may not.And that is because Big Bird and Barney never cut themselves with razor blades, smear themselves with excrement or expose their private parts on stage.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 2, 2012
If President Barack Obama had the time for some introspection on the campaign trail, he might take offense at all the media speculation (and in many cases wishful thinking gussied up as speculation) that his response to Hurricane Sandy will give him the edge going into Election Day. In effect, people are saying: "Obama is doing the minimum requirements of his job, what a game-changer!" Now, one could quibble about whether he's really doing what a president should. He's handing out a bunch of checks, which is warranted, but he has staff to do that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
This is bigger than Big Bird or even binders full of women. The first two presidential debates and vast public reaction have raised too many media-related questions to be addressed in one column. But the ones involving huge conversations in social media demand a closer look - especially in terms of who's doing the talking and how representative or biased they might be. Tuesday's town hall showdown generated 12.24 million comments on Twitter and Facebook, making it the top political event of all time in social media.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
Sal D'Avella's letter on Mitt Romney's budget proposal proves once again that one can attack or defend any idea ("Move over, Big Bird," Oct. 11). Four-hundred-fifty million dollars could indeed hire a lot of teachers. However, did Mr. D'Avella do any preliminary research to see if Sesame Street was an effective tool for educating children? Is this $450 million being well spent? It took me only the time to log onto the Internet to find several arguments for the continuation of Big Bird and the Sesame Street gang.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
See that above? On the right, you have the present-day girls' Big Bird costume. On the left? That's me in the 1982 version of the girls' Big Bird costume. Wait, my bad. Back then, it was just a Big Bird costume, no gender roles necessary. I mean, I know this has been going for ages, and that Halloween has turned into a way for people (grownups, one hopes) to let out their sexpot side for a day. (Check out this illustration of how costumes evolve from unicorn to sexy unicorn, nurse to sexy nurse, bee to sexy bee.)
NEWS
October 11, 2012
A recent editorial states that the Corporation for Public Broadcasting "gets all of $450 million" in federal funding, as if this amount were peanuts ("Big lies and Big Bird," Oct 8). But $450 million could hire 9,000 teachers at $50,000 per year. Surely, 9,000 teachers, instructing about 30 kids each, for six hours per day, could do a lot more good than Big Bird could with kids watching a TV screen for an hour every day. Sal D'Avella, Sykesville
NEWS
By David Horsey | October 11, 2012
Mitt Romney may have won the first presidential debate, but what stuck in many people's minds was his threat to fire Big Bird. Apparently, Mr. Romney thinks America's debt problem can be fixed by picking up pennies along Sesame Street. Pressed to explain how he would balance the federal budget while cutting trillions of dollars in taxes, the allegedly masterful debater offered up just two specifics: He would repeal "Obamacare" (even though the Congressional Budget Office says the health care act actually reduces deficit spending)
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 27, 1995
The residents of "Sesame Street" became the stars of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. yesterday.Big Bird played in the White House sculpture garden. A Muppet named Alice Snuffleupagus met Clinton aide George Stephanopoulus.The characters were invited to the White House by first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton as the White House stepped up its effort to save federal funding for public television. The first lady urged Democrats and Republicans to cooperate to preserve educational shows for children. Referring to the way episodes of PBS' "Sesame Street" are "brought to you by" letters and numbers, Mrs. Clinton said: "I like to think of what we do in Washington as being brought to you by both the D's and the R's. But that's something we still have to work on."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | July 2, 1993
Aboard Piney Run Lake's pontoon, children swept the clouds away, sang of sunny days and took the waterway to Sesame Street.Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Bert and Ernie dolls all came along for the ride Wednesday. Oscar and any other grouches stayed home.Karen Jenne, park assistant and pontoon captain for the day, passed out life jackets to the little cruisers. Many clutched a mother's hand and looked a little nervous as they embarked on their maiden voyages."Look, we are making waves," said Jeffrey Duerr, 5 1/2 , as the pontoon pulled away from the dock.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
Seems to me that philanthropist George Soros could pitch in and save Big Bird instead of helping President Obama reach his $1 billion campaign donation goal ("Big lies and Big Bird," Oct. 8). As far as "big lies" goes, what Mr. Romney is saying is no worse than what candidate Obama said in calling President George W. Bush "unpatriotic and irresponsible" for adding to the deficit. It's funny, too, that Mr. Romney's plan sounds like Gov. Martin O'Malley's holding the tax-rate the same but changing deductions and exemptions for higher-salaried folks.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
Two of the more memorable observations to come out of Mitt Romney during the first presidential debate had to do with fibs and Big Bird. The candidate said that as the father of sons, he knows that repeating a lie doesn't make it true. As to the latter? Look out, "Sesame Street," your days as a "victim" on the federal dole are numbered. The two seemingly unrelated remarks are worth mentioning because they intersect in Mr. Romney's tax and budget plans which, even by the most generous of interpretations, don't add up. If President Barack Obama failed in the debate, it was in not making that point strongly enough.
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