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NEWS
February 7, 1994
Ever since Edwin Hubble discovered early in this century that the universe is expanding, astronomers have been trying to account for the origin of all things. Running the clock backward for Hubble's observation that the galaxies are moving apart from each other, theorists speculated that sometime in the distant past all the matter in the universe must have been packed tightly together. Today most scientists believe the universe exploded into being some 15 billion years ago out of an incredibly dense "primeval atom" billions of times smaller than the diameter of a proton.
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HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Johns Hopkins University scientists are building a telescope meant to look at space in a way no one has before, hoping to probe the blackness between planets, stars and galaxies, into deep time and the mystery of how it all began. For decades, scientists have used telescopes to plumb the origins of the universe, but have not applied the scale or precision of the project that will use a four-telescope array called the Cosmology Large-Angular Scale Surveyor, or CLASS, being built now at the university's Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy.
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HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Johns Hopkins University scientists are building a telescope meant to look at space in a way no one has before, hoping to probe the blackness between planets, stars and galaxies, into deep time and the mystery of how it all began. For decades, scientists have used telescopes to plumb the origins of the universe, but have not applied the scale or precision of the project that will use a four-telescope array called the Cosmology Large-Angular Scale Surveyor, or CLASS, being built now at the university's Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Before walking into BangBang Mongolian Grill, take a deep breath. It might be your last chance to relax until dinner is over. The new addition to the Can Company in Canton, which opened in February, promotes its healthy, do-it-yourself meals with exclamations like "An Explosion of Flavors Await!" and, splashed across a bright red wall, "BRING IT!" Fans of Tony Horton's P90X videos will chuckle - the energetic fitness guru uses "Bring it!" as his catch phrase. That's appropriate because BangBang's shares the same manic energy that Horton exudes in front of the camera.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,Douglas Birch covers science for The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 1992
"It is the discovery of the century, if not all time."-- Stephen William Hawking, physicistNot many scientific discoveries make "Nightline," the "Today" show and People magazine.But then, the April 23 announcement by Dr. George Smoot that NASA's COBE satellite had found hot and cold regions in faint heat still left over from the moment the universe was created -- the Big Bang -- was no ordinary discovery.What Dr. Smoot, who works at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in California and the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, and his colleagues created was a snapshot of the universe a relatively short time after creation -- a snapshot that also can be viewed as the rough blueprint from which the present universe evolved.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1992
For the first time, scientists have observed long-sought relics of the "Big Bang," the primeval explosion that some believe created the universe 15 billion years ago.Those relics, massive wisps of gas more than 500 million light years long, are the largest and oldest structures ever observed, astrophysicist George Smoot of California's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory said yesterday at a meeting of the American Physical Society in Washington.The structures provide the answer to a question that has plagued cosmologists for decades: How did the widely dispersed primordial gases produced by a Big Bang coalesce into stars and galaxies?
NEWS
By SUSAN WOOD | July 13, 1992
Susan Wood of Aberdeen is a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. A graduate student in the School of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University, she will write each day of her experiences.The Maryland Delegation to the 1992 Democratic National Convention began their trek to New York with a big bang. Unfortunately, the big bang was just the bus suffering a flat tire.The Maryland Delegation's first stop en route to the Big Apple turned out to be alongside I-95 to fix it. (Maybe we should ask Perot to just fix it.)
NEWS
By ALBERT SEHLSTEDT Jr | March 28, 1993
Charles L. Bennett stood in the cold, pre-dawn morning at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California and fixed his eye on an aging NASA rocket -- a patch here, a bit of glue there. The rocket was a Delta-1, the last remaining booster in an early series of expendable rockets that had sent a host of highly successful scientific payloads into orbit.It was Nov. 18, 1989, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was about to launch one of the most complex satellites ever built, a 2 1/2 -ton package of delicate instruments designed to help answer such basic questions as how the universe evolved after a primordial Big Bang which scientists believe occurred about 15 billion years ago.However, on this November morning, Dr. Bennett, who earned his Ph.D.
NEWS
April 5, 1998
AT LAST, Japanese citizens can trade foreign currency to whomever makes the best offer, shop the world for the best investments and force companies to compete for their business. This should stimulate the moribund Japanese economy.Yet the "Big Bang" of deregulation on April 1 -- a long list of reforms that will take until 2001 for full implementation -- comes at a moment of deep gloom in Japan. Washington is counting on Japanese capital to lead the rescue of stalled Asian economies and insolvent institutions.
NEWS
By Luther Young and Luther Young,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 16, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- A pillar of the big-bang theory of the creation of the universe, under increasing assault for its divergence from cosmic observations, suffered a new blow yesterday at a gathering of more than a thousand astronomers here.Although the "cold-dark-matter" theory -- which could explain why most of the mass produced by the big bang cannot be detected -- was declared still alive by several prominent cosmologists, it was clearly cast in further doubt by results from a recently launched American-German X-ray satellite.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance , frank.roylance@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Pushing the Hubble Space Telescope's newest camera to its limits, astronomers say they have captured images of some of the most distant galaxies ever seen - more than 13 billion light years away. Amid a swarm of oddly shaped objects in the photograph are some dim, reddish spots that the scientists believe to be some of the earliest galaxies ever formed, seen as they appeared just 600 million years after the Big Bang that marked the beginning of the universe. "Preliminary indications are that we are indeed seeing some galaxies at [greater distances]
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
On this date in 4004 B.C. (Julian calendar), God began the creation of the universe, according to the "Annals of the Old Testament," written by Archbishop James Ussher in 1650. Cosmologists have arrived at a somewhat earlier, and less precise, date, based on observations of receding galaxies. They date the beginning of time and space to the Big Bang, 13.7 billion years ago, give or take a few million.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2008
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -- Fireworks are difficult to see in broad daylight, but those who plan to watch the NCAA Division I men's lacrosse tournament shouldn't have any problems seeing the pyrotechnics. That's because the four teams in the national semifinals have some of the most explosive offenses in the country. Top seed Duke (18-1), No. 3 seed Syracuse (14-2) and No. 2 seed Virginia (14-3) rate first, second and fourth in the nation in scoring, respectively, and No. 5 seed Johns Hopkins (10-5)
NEWS
August 26, 2007
RALPH ALPHER, 86 Physicist Ralph Alpher, a physicist who did pioneering work on the underpinnings of the Big Bang theory, died Aug. 12 in Austin, Texas. Dr. Alpher had been honored by President Bush with a National Medal of Science in July but couldn't attend the ceremony because of his poor health, Union College in Schenectady said in announcing his death. He had been a member of the school's faculty. The Big Bang theory holds that the universe began in the explosion of a single, super-dense point that contained all matter.
FEATURES
By Zap2it.com | May 16, 2007
As CBS prepares to present its slate for next season to advertisers this morning, the network has reportedly ordered four dramas and at least one comedy. In addition to the previously expected pick-ups, the industry trade papers are reporting that CBS will order Moonlight. Formerly titled Twilight, the Angel-esque drama stars Alex O'Loughlin as a vampire private investigator. Moonlight takes the slot most observers were expecting to go to the zombie dramedy Babylon Fields, which is still believed to be in contention for a midseason slot, along with the LL Cool J vehicle The Man and Skip Tracer, which stars Stephen Dorff.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2006
People often ask me: `Do you believe in the big bang or in creation by God?' And my answer is, `Yes.'" THE REV. BILL STOEGER, one of the astronomers who works at an observatory owned by the Vatican in the mountains of Arizona.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | April 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Peering into the dim glow from the explosive birth of the universe, astronomers for the first time have seen the seeds of matter that over the eons grew into gigantic galaxies of stars.The astronomers said the patterns of seeds represent the oldest and largest structures in the universe.The findings could revolutionize astronomy, the scientists said, by helping to solve several major problems, including how galaxies formed and why they clump together in huge "superclusters.""English doesn't have enough superlatives . . . to convey the story" of the new results, said George Smoot of the University of California at Berkeley, leader of the team that reported the discovery.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
In an effort compared to photographing a firefly on the moon, the Hubble Space Telescope has gathered enough feeble light from the fringes of the cosmos to create a stunning portrait of the universe as it existed less than 800 million years after the big bang. The photograph, dubbed the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, reveals a chaotic, strange and often savage environment of dueling galaxies and infant stars - most of which are invisible to telescopes on the ground. "The image you see is full of superlatives," Steven V.W. Beckwith, director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, said yesterday morning at a news conference to unveil the image.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
Scientists examining the oldest light in the universe say they've found clear evidence that matter expanded at an almost inconceivable rate after the big bang, creating conditions that led to the formation of the first stars. Light from the big bang's afterglow shows that the universe grew from the size of a marble to an astronomical size in just a trillionth of a second after its birth 13.7 billion years ago, researchers from Johns Hopkins and Princeton universities say. Readings from a NASA probe also show that the earliest stars formed about 400 million years after the big bang - not 200 million years afterward, as the research team once thought.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2004
Blackout routines performed by people who act as if they're on the verge of blacking out. That's the comic mechanism of Napoleon Dynamite, a deadpan farce named for a sour, gangly, bespectacled high-school misfit (Jon Heder) who lives with his endlessly computer-chatting thirtysomething brother Kip (Aaron Ruell) and their salty grandmother (Sandy Martin) in the small town of Preston, Idaho. Random acts of unkindness mingle with bungled acts of generosity as Napoleon, a fantasist by nature and a rebel by default, eventually joins forces with good-hearted Pedro (Efren Ramirez)
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