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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 2, 1997
Trends in the field of interior design often prove short-lived. And they may now be more fleeting than ever, due to the faster and faster pace of contemporary life. Some people change the look of their surroundings as often as they change their hairstyles.Trends in furniture, on the other hand, tend to be longer-lasting. A good example is Biedermeier styling, which remains one of the hottest furniture looks more than a decade after its revival got under way. The main reason for this relative durability, I believe, is that the factors that drove the Biedermeier resurgence in the '80s are still operating today.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 2, 1997
Trends in the field of interior design often prove short-lived. And they may now be more fleeting than ever, due to the faster and faster pace of contemporary life. Some people change the look of their surroundings as often as they change their hairstyles.Trends in furniture, on the other hand, tend to be longer-lasting. A good example is Biedermeier styling, which remains one of the hottest furniture looks more than a decade after its revival got under way. The main reason for this relative durability, I believe, is that the factors that drove the Biedermeier resurgence in the '80s are still operating today.
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By Linda Bennett and Linda Bennett,Contributing Writer | January 9, 1994
The beginning of a new year brings out the trend forecaster in all of us.Something about trading in those dog-eared old calendars for fresh new ones makes us feel comfortable predicting what's hot and what's not for the next 12 months.The old year was marked by a confusing mixture of home-related trends.New and existing house sales were brisk for much of 1993, thanks to low interest rates and pent-up demand. But business for furniture manufacturers and retailers merely had "improved to slow" by the end of the year, according to Linda Jones of Masco, a giant corporation involved in both home building and home furnishings.
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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
The late Victorian farmhouse is sound, but it needs work -- a lot of work. Built in 1875, it hasn't been renovated since the 1950s."It's a long-term project," said homeowner Sharon A. H. May -- even if the house is only 5 feet long and 4 feet high.While the chief of the Baltimore state's attorney's sex offense unit spends her days in deadly serious work, prosecuting criminals, she spends her evenings and weekends "in another world.""I come home to play with my toys," she said of the 22 dollhouses that occupy every room of her Baltimore County home "except the laundry, the kitchen and the bathroom."
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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
The late Victorian farmhouse is sound, but it needs work -- a lot of work. Built in 1875, it hasn't been renovated since the 1950s."It's a long-term project," said homeowner Sharon A. H. May -- even if the house is only 5 feet long and 4 feet high.While the chief of the Baltimore state's attorney's sex offense unit spends her days in deadly serious work, prosecuting criminals, she spends her evenings and weekends "in another world.""I come home to play with my toys," she said of the 22 dollhouses that occupy every room of her Baltimore County home "except the laundry, the kitchen and the bathroom."
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
Painted finishes and trompe l'oeil are big news at this year's Baltimore Symphony Decorators' Show House, but there are a number of other recurrent notes in the rooms. While each designer gave the objects or treatments an individual imaginative twist, there were clearly some trends at work.Among them:*Sisal rugs: Used in formal and informal settings, sometimes painted, sometimes plain.*"Aged" metal and wire objects: "Ancient" metal objects ranged from mirrors to chandeliers to shelves.*Neoclassical touches: Biedermeier-style furniture shows up in bedroom and living room; obelisks, gilt are prominent.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 28, 1990
HIGH POINT, N.C. -- Arts and crafts style -- the early 20th century crop of sturdy, honest architecture and furniture for the common man -- blooms again.The field is so full that designers are distinguishing between twarts and crafts categories. Mission style is heavy, straight, no-nonsense oak. Prairie style, most often associated with Frank Lloyd Wright, is also mostly straight-lined and horizontal, but the scale is lighter and the designs more varied.But the real news here are arts and crafts' 1990 hybrids.
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By Elizabeth Large | February 25, 1996
Natural motifs are still very hot, at least according to Country Business, a trade publication designed for retailers of country gifts and accessories. The green trend includes gardening motifs, notably pansies and gardenias. (Say goodbye to sunflowers; they are finally passe.)Vegetables and leafy greens are everywhere, too, showing up on fabrics, wallpapers and accessories. What look like real vegetables are actually candles; in fact, candles with environmental themes and natural colors are particularly hot right now.Natural finishes like unbleached cotton are also popular, as are vegetable pigment dyes in bedding and decorative fabrics.
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By Elizabeth Large | January 1, 1995
Much of the interior design and home furnishings industry depends on trends. What do the experts see ahead for us in 1995? Here are some predictions:* Michelle Lamb, trend consultant and editor of the Trend Curve: "Watch for the creeping forward motion of formality, witnessed by the interest in Biedermeier and neoclassical and refined, luxurious fabrics. There are hints of more chintz and the return of flat, less textured fabrics."* Marian McEvoy, editor-in-chief, Elle Decor: "People will be going fresh, no matter what the furniture style.
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By BETH SMITH | April 21, 1996
Two antiques-loving urban dwellers are ready to move out to the country. They see a 1960s contemporary rancher on 2 rural acres. It couldn't be more different than the 1812 Baltimore city townhouse they're living in. Do they cross it off their list or opt for a closer look? Seeing great possibilities in the rancher, interior designers Robert Hale and Tom Williams go for the closer look.The men, partners in the Ruxton firm of Hale-Williams Interior Design, were intrigued by the small house they found on the edge of Green Spring Valley.
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By Linda Bennett and Linda Bennett,Contributing Writer | January 9, 1994
The beginning of a new year brings out the trend forecaster in all of us.Something about trading in those dog-eared old calendars for fresh new ones makes us feel comfortable predicting what's hot and what's not for the next 12 months.The old year was marked by a confusing mixture of home-related trends.New and existing house sales were brisk for much of 1993, thanks to low interest rates and pent-up demand. But business for furniture manufacturers and retailers merely had "improved to slow" by the end of the year, according to Linda Jones of Masco, a giant corporation involved in both home building and home furnishings.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 20, 1993
Q: What's the value of my 19-inch-high glass vase marked "Le Verre Francais" and signed "Charder"? It was a wedding present to my mother in 1929.A: "Le Verre Francais" was a commercial line of cameo glass made by the C. Schneider factory in Epinay-sur-Seine, France, from 1920 to 1933. Your vase, signed by its artist, Charder, has an acid-engraved floral design over layered glass in different colors. It's worth around $1,400, according to vintage glass dealer Jack McAuliff, of Fancy That, 324 W. Broad St., Chesaning, Mich.
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By Linda Bennett and Linda Bennett,Contributing Writer | October 31, 1993
A nostalgic American farmhouse style created a stir earlier this month at the massive fall International Home Furnishings Market in High Point, N.C.Twice a year, nearly 70,000 furniture retailers, interior designers and media representatives from all over the world converge on this small Southern town to see what's new from more than 1,900 furniture and accessory lines, showcased in about 7 million square feet of exhibit space.News this market was a farm-fresh slant on the popular casual country designs that fill consumer demand for comfortable, functional furniture that stands up to real-life wear and tear.
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