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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
The parent of 1st Mariner Bank, which is under federal orders to raise capital, said Wednesday that it received approval to transfer its stock listing to the Nasdaq Capital Market, a smaller exchange primarily for companies raising capital. First Mariner Bancorp had faced potential delisting and was given until Feb. 22 to meet the minimum bid price of $1 share to remain listed on the Nasdaq Global Market. While listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market, the Baltimore bank holding company will have a 180-day extension, or until Aug. 22, to meet the $1 minimum bid price requirement, according to a regulatory filing.
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EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
One of the strangest rituals in Harford County is making the transition to cyberspace this year: The county's annual tax sale is to be conducted over the Internet on June 20. The tax sale is a strange bit of business that's hard to understand. Far from the popular image of a sale on the courthouse steps wherein a slippery character is able to procure the family homestead from folks down on their luck for the price of settling a real estate tax debt, the ritual is one that would be better described as bizarre rather than sinister.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY | June 12, 1994
Q: Why is a stock's "bid" price always lower than its "asked" price?A: The "bid" price is the price someone is willing to pay for your shares. The "asked" price is the price at which someone will sell the stock to you.The actual price at which you buy or sell might be somewhere between the bid price and the asked price. The difference between the bid price and the asked price is called the "spread" or the "markup."On the New York and American Stock Exchanges, each stock is assigned to a "specialist," whose primary function is to maintain an orderly market in that stock -- that is, whenever possible, preventing the stock from swinging wildly on any one day. The specialist generally "makes book" by matching up buyers and sellers, who buy and sell simultaneously at the same price, often between the bid and asked prices.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
The parent of 1st Mariner Bank, which is under federal orders to raise capital, said Wednesday that it received approval to transfer its stock listing to the Nasdaq Capital Market, a smaller exchange primarily for companies raising capital. First Mariner Bancorp had faced potential delisting and was given until Feb. 22 to meet the minimum bid price of $1 share to remain listed on the Nasdaq Global Market. While listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market, the Baltimore bank holding company will have a 180-day extension, or until Aug. 22, to meet the $1 minimum bid price requirement, according to a regulatory filing.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2002
Baltimore financial services company eChapman Inc. said it earned a first-quarter profit of $245,000, or 2 cents a share, on revenue of $1.7 million. That compares with a loss of $1.6 million, or 13 cents a share, on revenue of $1.4 million in last year's first quarter. The company attributed the improved results to cutting costs and a revised strategy that de-emphasizes Internet operations. As part of the moves, eChapman is seeking a buyer for NetNoir, an African-American-oriented Internet portal the company agreed to acquire last July, General Counsel James P. Wu said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
Baltimore-based RailWorks Corp. will ask shareholders to approve a reverse stock split at its annual meeting May 4 to try to boost the company's flagging share price and maintain its listing on the Nasdaq stock market. In a preliminary proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission this week, RailWorks officials said that maintaining the national market listing is necessary to attract new investors as the railroad equipment and services provider seeks to dig out of its financial troubles.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY and SUSAN BONDY,Creators Syndicate | July 16, 1995
Q: Is there a difference between buying a stock that is listed on an exchange and buying an over-the-counter stock?A: Here are the three major differences:* Stock prices are arrived at through different processes.* The major exchanges have more stringent requirements for listing a stock.* The prices may be quoted differently in the newspaper and by the broker.A stock exchange centralizes trading in one location -- the floor of the exchange. There, buyers and sellers come together and, following auction principles, agree on a price for the trade.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
The parent of 1st Mariner Bank, which is under pressure to raise capital, faces potential delisting from the Nasdaq stock trading market, the Baltimore bank holding company said Friday in a regulatory filing. First Mariner Bancorp said it received a letter Tuesday from Nasdaq that its stock has not maintained a minimum bid price of $1 a share for 30 consecutive business days. Nasdaq has given the company until Feb. 22 to meet the exchange's minimum stock price requirement or face delisting.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Nasdaq Stock Market price changes will be listed in increments as small as 1/16th of a point, or 6.25 cents, starting this spring, the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) said yesterday.Dealers in the Nasdaq market will continue to quote bid and ask prices of stocks priced above $10 in increments of 1/8 of a point, or 12.5 cents, on the system's computer screens. However, "a lot of trades occur between the spread," said NASD Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Richard Ketchum.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 2004
Comcast has repeatedly indicated in talks with investors over the past two days that it has no plans to sweeten its offer for Walt Disney Co., and many of them seem certain that the company is playing a waiting game. Comcast's bid was worth $23.90 a share yesterday, or about $50 billion. Shares of Disney continued to run far ahead of the offer price, closing yesterday at $26.90, but Comcast is betting that Disney's stock will fall below the bid price as time passes and no new bidder emerges.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
The parent of 1st Mariner Bank, which is under pressure to raise capital, faces potential delisting from the Nasdaq stock trading market, the Baltimore bank holding company said Friday in a regulatory filing. First Mariner Bancorp said it received a letter Tuesday from Nasdaq that its stock has not maintained a minimum bid price of $1 a share for 30 consecutive business days. Nasdaq has given the company until Feb. 22 to meet the exchange's minimum stock price requirement or face delisting.
FEATURES
By Martin Miller and Martin Miller,Los Angeles Times | June 19, 2007
Sometimes when the universe closes a door, it opens up what's behind showcase No. 2! Having recently flown from her perch on The View, Rosie O'Donnell confirmed on her personal blog that she is probably meeting with producers this week about the possibility of succeeding Bob Barker as host of CBS' franchise daytime game show The Price Is Right. Officials at CBS were unavailable for comment, but the network has struggled for months in trying to find a suitable replacement for the iconic Barker, who was the face of the hit morning show for 35 years.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
ANAHEIM, Calif. - After starting free-agent pitcher Carl Pavano with a three-year offer, the Orioles got a deeper sense of the market yesterday and offered him a four-year pact worth about $40 million, baseball sources said. And still, they realized that might not be enough. During a frustrating day at the winter meetings, the Orioles were hit with a stark realization: The prices have skyrocketed. According to team sources, they also have a three-year, $30 million offer on the table for free-agent first baseman Carlos Delgado, but will probably have to dig deeper to get him signed.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 2004
Comcast has repeatedly indicated in talks with investors over the past two days that it has no plans to sweeten its offer for Walt Disney Co., and many of them seem certain that the company is playing a waiting game. Comcast's bid was worth $23.90 a share yesterday, or about $50 billion. Shares of Disney continued to run far ahead of the offer price, closing yesterday at $26.90, but Comcast is betting that Disney's stock will fall below the bid price as time passes and no new bidder emerges.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2002
A private developer from Washington snapped up about 120 properties that Baltimore officials had hoped local nonprofits would buy as part of Project 5000, an initiative to take control of vacant and abandoned houses. City officials and neighborhood groups expressed concern that the properties had been sold to a speculator at a sealed-bid auction last month, when SkyRise Investors outbid a group of community development corporations with a $140,010 offer. But they say the sale will not be a setback to the ambitious Project 5000 as long as SkyRise is serious about rehabilitating the houses.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2002
Baltimore financial services company eChapman Inc. said it earned a first-quarter profit of $245,000, or 2 cents a share, on revenue of $1.7 million. That compares with a loss of $1.6 million, or 13 cents a share, on revenue of $1.4 million in last year's first quarter. The company attributed the improved results to cutting costs and a revised strategy that de-emphasizes Internet operations. As part of the moves, eChapman is seeking a buyer for NetNoir, an African-American-oriented Internet portal the company agreed to acquire last July, General Counsel James P. Wu said yesterday.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2002
A private developer from Washington snapped up about 120 properties that Baltimore officials had hoped local nonprofits would buy as part of Project 5000, an initiative to take control of vacant and abandoned houses. City officials and neighborhood groups expressed concern that the properties had been sold to a speculator at a sealed-bid auction last month, when SkyRise Investors outbid a group of community development corporations with a $140,010 offer. But they say the sale will not be a setback to the ambitious Project 5000 as long as SkyRise is serious about rehabilitating the houses.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
One of the strangest rituals in Harford County is making the transition to cyberspace this year: The county's annual tax sale is to be conducted over the Internet on June 20. The tax sale is a strange bit of business that's hard to understand. Far from the popular image of a sale on the courthouse steps wherein a slippery character is able to procure the family homestead from folks down on their luck for the price of settling a real estate tax debt, the ritual is one that would be better described as bizarre rather than sinister.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2001
In the Region RailWorks shares can keep their Nasdaq listing RailWorks Corp.'s shares will continue to be traded on the Nasdaq stock market, as a result of new listing standards being implemented by market officials in a pilot program. The Baltimore County-based rail construction and services company had been told by market officials in March that it would need to achieve a minimum bid price of $5 per share by May 18 or face losing its Nasdaq listing. On May 4, the company's shareholders approved a reverse stock split in hopes of raising the company's share price.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
Baltimore-based RailWorks Corp. will ask shareholders to approve a reverse stock split at its annual meeting May 4 to try to boost the company's flagging share price and maintain its listing on the Nasdaq stock market. In a preliminary proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission this week, RailWorks officials said that maintaining the national market listing is necessary to attract new investors as the railroad equipment and services provider seeks to dig out of its financial troubles.
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