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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
More than 400 cyclists traversed scenic, rural Baltimore County roads on Sunday to raise money for bicycle safety, paying tribute to a cyclist killed on one of those byways. The event was the fourth Larry's Ride, launched by family and friends of Larry Bensky after the father of two was fatally struck by a motorist on Butler Road in 2010. His wife, Tami, anticipated raising about $25,000 this year. "It's amazing that something that starts off as 'let's get together and honor Larry's life' turns into this big thing," she said as cyclists fresh from the ride passed by, volunteers grilled lunch and kids jumped in an inflatable castle.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Todd Green never expected to be the public face of bicycle safety. He's not even a huge cycling fan. But as he and girlfriend Katie Pohler took a bike ride down the Baltimore-Annapolis Trail on Saturday, they became the fifth and sixth cyclists injured in a three-day span in Anne Arundel County in accidents between cars and bikes. Pohler, a 23-year-old college student, remains at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, while Green, sporting scrapes on his forehead and legs, traveled to Annapolis on Monday to join police at a news conference urging both drivers and bicyclists to pay attention and follow the rules of the road "Motorists and bicyclists have rights and responsibilities," said Anne Arundel Police Chief Kevin Davis, wearing the shorts and polo shirt uniform worn by the county's bike patrol.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
With eight pedestrians and one bicyclist killed by motor vehicles this year in Anne Arundel County, police are tackling the issue with a special operation in the eastern area of the county, where four pedestrians were killed. "The goal is education and enforcement, but mostly education," said Justin Mulcahy, police spokesman. Officers will stop motorists, pedestrians and cyclists they see violating the rules of the road, he said. That includes drivers ignoring bicycle lanes and pedestrians who jaywalk.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
More than 400 cyclists traversed scenic, rural Baltimore County roads on Sunday to raise money for bicycle safety, paying tribute to a cyclist killed on one of those byways. The event was the fourth Larry's Ride, launched by family and friends of Larry Bensky after the father of two was fatally struck by a motorist on Butler Road in 2010. His wife, Tami, anticipated raising about $25,000 this year. "It's amazing that something that starts off as 'let's get together and honor Larry's life' turns into this big thing," she said as cyclists fresh from the ride passed by, volunteers grilled lunch and kids jumped in an inflatable castle.
NEWS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Contributing Writer | November 21, 1993
Dawn Blean still shudders when she remembers her 3-year-old son's close encounter with a truck as he rode in a bicycle seat behind her.Ms. Blean heard the truck approach, then felt something hit her in the back, causing her to crash the bike in a ditch.Both she and her son had been hit by a side-rearview mirror on the passing truck.Neither of them was badly hurt. But the bicycle helmet her son Thomas wore was cracked like an egg.Had he not been wearing it, he most certainly would have been seriously hurt and maybe killed.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | September 10, 1991
John Overstreet's wheels are always turning -- the ones in his head as well as the ones on his bicycle.Since he started a biking project for Girl Scouts 20 years ago, this graying grandfather, 64, has become Anne Arundel's patron saint of bicycle safety, a walking encyclopedia of every bicycle-related statistic anyone could want to know.Overstreet can tell you the time of day when most bicycle accidents occur (6 to 7 p.m.). He can tell you the most dangerous road in the county for bicyclists (Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard)
HEALTH
By Jean Fain and Jean Fain,Jean Fain is a Boston-based writer. Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 18, 1990
Linda Tracy, 34, had put off buying a bicycle helmet for a decade. A daily bicycle commuter and the program manager of the Bicycle Federation of America, a nonprofit organization that promotes bicycle safety, Ms. Tracy paid a lot of lip service to the value of bike helmets.Tired of hearing of Ms. Tracy's good intentions, her boss finally gave her a helmet. Six weeks later when a fast-moving car slammed into her front wheel, the statistics finally hit home.Of the more than 1,000 bicycling deaths each year, more than 75 percent are caused by head injuries.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 28, 1990
Eight-year-old Julie Kurtzman had all the necessary equipment when she pedaled her bicycle up Carrillon Drive in Ellicott City to sell Girl Scout cookies. Her Brownie uniform and cap were neat and her order form was in hand.Come Monday, however, she'll have to add another piece of equipment to her outfit, as a Howard County law takes effect that requires children under age 16 to wear protective headgear while riding bikes on county-maintained roads.Nancy Kurtzman, who rode a bicycle next to her daughter, realized she was near the deadline for buying a helmet for Julie and her 6-year-old son."
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | November 4, 2006
For decades, John Overstreet has been known as "Mr. Bike Safety," passing out free helmets, compiling statistics on accidents and pedaling about 100 miles a week in Anne Arundel County. Now, at 80 and slowed by Alzheimer's disease, the facts and figures don't come the way they used to, but he still is out on his blue tricycle every chance he gets -- always with a helmet. Yesterday, at Saw Mill Creek Park in Glen Burnie, where over the years Overstreet biked the paths miles at a time, state and county officials unveiled signs for the new John Overstreet Connector -- a 1.5-mile path that links the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail to the BWI Trail -- to honor a man who taught the basics of bicycle safety.
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 11, 1999
In Baltimore CityMan's condition critical after freight train hits him, severs his legsA Baltimore County man's legs were severed early yesterday when he was struck by a Conrail freight train in the 4900 block of E. Lombard St., city traffic police said.Kevin Thomas, 19, of the 9800 block of Charbank Lane in Middle River apparently was trying to cross the track about 2: 45 a.m. when he was struck by the train, which severed his legs and dragged him more than 200 yards. Workers on another Conrail freight train spotted the blood and found Thomas lying on the track, police said.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
Having ridden bicycles since childhood, I prefer not to wear a bicycle helmet ("The bike helmet debate," Feb. 16. However, I would not want to discourage a rider who feels more secure in wearing one. Having also ridden motorcycles, and being a believer in the use of standard full head helmets while riding them, I can say there is a major difference in the level of safety provided by the two vastly different types of helmets. If I believed a helmet should be worn while riding a bicycle, I would use the motorcycle type.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
An off-street bike trail links Truxton Park in Annapolis to the Bates Sports Complex. A bicycle lane runs along Edgewood Road between the Back Creek Nature Park and Bay Ridge Road. A snippet of shared bicycle-motor vehicle lane cuts the angle from Bladen Street to Northwest Street. There are six miles of trails in the city, but few connections between them, and almost no markers to point out routes to popular destinations. The city council is considering a plan to create a network of 34 miles of marked bicycle routes: a mix of bike lanes on city streets, shared-use lanes for drivers and cyclists, and off-road paths.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
With eight pedestrians and one bicyclist killed by motor vehicles this year in Anne Arundel County, police are tackling the issue with a special operation in the eastern area of the county, where four pedestrians were killed. "The goal is education and enforcement, but mostly education," said Justin Mulcahy, police spokesman. Officers will stop motorists, pedestrians and cyclists they see violating the rules of the road, he said. That includes drivers ignoring bicycle lanes and pedestrians who jaywalk.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
The Maryland Green Party has nominated Kenniss Henry to replace her daughter, Natasha Pettigrew, on the ballot for U.S. Senate , the party announced Wednesday. Pettigrew died this month after a sport utility vehicle struck her while she was cycling in Prince George's County. Henry's name was submitted Monday to the Maryland State Board of Elections for the seat long held by Democratic Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. The party's coordinating council voted unanimously Sunday night to nominate Henry.
NEWS
By Shayna Meliker and Shayna Meliker,Sun reporter | June 22, 2008
Rick Wilson's father taught him how to ride a bike. The pair, who lived on the Carroll County side of Mount Airy, used to travel into Howard County on the weekends to ride the paths. But one summer day in August 1979, Wilson's father did not come home. As he was cycling along Route 27, when it used to be a rural road, he was hit by a truck and killed. Wilson, now an Ellicott City resident, did not pick up a bike for 17 years, but he started riding again 12 years ago for health reasons.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | November 4, 2006
For decades, John Overstreet has been known as "Mr. Bike Safety," passing out free helmets, compiling statistics on accidents and pedaling about 100 miles a week in Anne Arundel County. Now, at 80 and slowed by Alzheimer's disease, the facts and figures don't come the way they used to, but he still is out on his blue tricycle every chance he gets -- always with a helmet. Yesterday, at Saw Mill Creek Park in Glen Burnie, where over the years Overstreet biked the paths miles at a time, state and county officials unveiled signs for the new John Overstreet Connector -- a 1.5-mile path that links the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail to the BWI Trail -- to honor a man who taught the basics of bicycle safety.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | June 11, 1991
Councilwoman Maureen Lamb wants to put a helmet on every bicyclist in Anne Arundel County.A cycling enthusiast who says her daughter was saved by a helmet, Lamb, D-Annapolis, said she will introduce legislation this summer requiring the protective headgear for both children and adults."
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
The Westminster Police Department has begun a downtown bicycle patrol that officials say will compliment foot patrols in the business district and nearby neighborhoods.Officer Keith Benfer, a recent graduate of the Frederick City Police bicycle training course, volunteered to launch the city's one-bike pilot program.Officer Benfer, who rode 10 miles on his first day of patrol yesterday, uses a wide-tire mountain bike."The bike patrol will enhance the foot officers in the downtown sections of the city and Officer Benfer will also journey out to other neighborhoods," Westminster Police Chief Sam Leppo said.
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 11, 1999
In Baltimore CityMan's condition critical after freight train hits him, severs his legsA Baltimore County man's legs were severed early yesterday when he was struck by a Conrail freight train in the 4900 block of E. Lombard St., city traffic police said.Kevin Thomas, 19, of the 9800 block of Charbank Lane in Middle River apparently was trying to cross the track about 2: 45 a.m. when he was struck by the train, which severed his legs and dragged him more than 200 yards. Workers on another Conrail freight train spotted the blood and found Thomas lying on the track, police said.
NEWS
January 19, 1997
The cost of going after the 'Muffin Lady'This letter is in reference to the "Muffin Lady" article in The Sun on Jan. 9. I am writing to declare my outrage against the actions taken against Linda Fisher of Westminster.It is my understanding that Charles L. Zeleski, director of environmental health of the Carroll County Health Department, has decided that due to "violations," Ms. Fisher's "business" of selling homemade muffins must be shut down or face penalties of up to $1,000 per day.This business is her sole source of income, since being laid off, for her and her child.
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