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Bicycle Lanes

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NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Anne Arundel County would create 215 miles of bicycle lanes and make pedestrian safety upgrades at 160 intersections over 15 years under a plan to be considered by the County Council next month. The county's first pedestrian and bicycle master plan was scheduled to be introduced at last night's County Council meeting, but it was postponed because of the snowstorm. There will not be money available for at least another year to begin the projects outlined in the plan, county planning officials cautioned.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Howard County's new U.S. 1 meets the old near the Route 175 intersection, where the Jessup Plaza features a deli that offers breakfast all day, along with money orders, a shiatsu massage parlor and Jimmy G's Check Cashing. Just north of that, though, builders are raising Howard Square, a new project with townhouses, apartments and stores. Howard Square is part of the U.S. 1 envisioned by county planners, who for years have been charting a future for the old highway — maintaining its role as a job center while improving the appearance to make it inviting to development different from the hodgepodge of strip malls and fast-food restaurants so prevalent along the route.
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NEWS
By David Anderson and David Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
The State Highway Administration has begun work on projects designed to improve pedestrian safety along Harford Road in the Parkville-Carney area. The improvements, which crews started last week, are between the Baltimore City line and Joppa Road. They include new crosswalks and other traffic-calming measures, stop lines to show motorists approaching Harford Road on side streets where to stop, 4-foot-wide bicycle lanes and a new traffic light. Installation of the traffic light, at Harford and Emerald roads, will begin Dec. 1 and should be completed by early next year, said Lora Rakowski, a State Highway Administration spokeswoman.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 15, 2013
A stated goal of Harford County's Pedestrian Master Plan and its component that advocates for increased bicycle-friendly thoroughfares is a bit far-fetched, namely to make the county more "multi-modal" in terms of transportation options. Turning Harford County into a place where anything approaching a significant number of people can rely on bicycles as a primary mode of transportation is an idea that left the station three or four generations ago, when our ancestors got in their cars and fled cities to settle in places like Harford County.
NEWS
By Amanda Urban and Amanda Urban,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2002
Few would argue that the Weems Creek Bridge - a 50-year-old span that's often called the gateway to Annapolis - needs to be replaced. But the State Highway Administration and residents are at odds over the width of a new bridge to carry motorists on Rowe Boulevard into the historic center of the state capital. Last year, state officials decided to replace the bridge rather than to refurbish it. The proposed new bridge would feature sidewalks and bicycle lanes and would have a wider median strip that could be turned into a fifth lane.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 15, 2013
A stated goal of Harford County's Pedestrian Master Plan and its component that advocates for increased bicycle-friendly thoroughfares is a bit far-fetched, namely to make the county more "multi-modal" in terms of transportation options. Turning Harford County into a place where anything approaching a significant number of people can rely on bicycles as a primary mode of transportation is an idea that left the station three or four generations ago, when our ancestors got in their cars and fled cities to settle in places like Harford County.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
In a sign of the growing influence of Baltimore's bicyclists, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will sign two bills Friday intended to promote safety on two wheels in the city. One of the measures, which recently cleared the City Council, would require the use of bicycle-safe storm grates on any new roads in the city. The other would increase the fine for motorists who park in bicycle lanes. The council passed both measures after hearings in which dozens of advocates showed up to urge tougher measures to make the city more bicycle-friendly.
NEWS
By Kory Dodd and Kory Dodd,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
Looking out of over Weems Creek toward the Rowe Boulevard bridge from the sliding glass doors in his bedroom, Evan Belaga is filled with a sense of excitement. As president of the Weems Creek Conservancy, Belaga has spent the past few years fighting to restore the sediment-clogged creek and lobbying the State Highway Administration to build a bridge that won't damage the Annapolis waterway. Belaga's goals may finally be realized after the state recently decided to spend more money to clean up the creek and revise construction plans for a new bridge, narrowing its width.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2005
LIKE MANY other neighborhoods in Howard County, Waverly Woods is concerned about motorists speeding through the community. Shannon Gillen, a community manager for First Real Estate Management, is excited about the innovative approach to traffic calming that the Waverly Woods homeowners association will try out soon. "Installing bike lanes is a great alternative to the traditional traffic humps and other measures that usually go in," she said. The bicycle lanes will be marked with lines, rather than a physical structure, but according to information she has obtained, lines are just as effective as other traffic-calming structures, such as chokers or speed humps, and a lot less expensive to maintain.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Howard County's new U.S. 1 meets the old near the Route 175 intersection, where the Jessup Plaza features a deli that offers breakfast all day, along with money orders, a shiatsu massage parlor and Jimmy G's Check Cashing. Just north of that, though, builders are raising Howard Square, a new project with townhouses, apartments and stores. Howard Square is part of the U.S. 1 envisioned by county planners, who for years have been charting a future for the old highway — maintaining its role as a job center while improving the appearance to make it inviting to development different from the hodgepodge of strip malls and fast-food restaurants so prevalent along the route.
EXPLORE
August 21, 2012
In his letter to the Towson Times last week, Tom Rose took umbrage in this space over some concerns I voiced the week before about having bike lanes installed on heavily traveled roadways in Towson ("Bike beltway will be safe if cyclists and motorists respect rules of road. ") Unfortunately he was also critical of some views that I neither expressed nor hold. Mr. Rose is entitled to his own opinions, but he is not entitled to his own facts. I wrote in the first sentence of my letter that I believe cyclist have as much right to use the roadways as motorists, but Mr. Rose implied that I said the opposite.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 13, 2012
From time to time, the subject of having safe lanes or other thoroughfares where people can walk and ride their bikes in Harford County arises, and there's every reason to believe such community amenities would be well used. It isn't a new idea. The original pedestrian-friendly walkways are sidewalks, which have been around since the days when streets weren't paved and a lot of people walked. Sidewalks, be they brick, board or concrete, were elevated above the streets initially so the many folks who got around on their feet could avoid stepping in pollution left by the transportation engines of the day: horses and beasts of burden.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
In a sign of the growing influence of Baltimore's bicyclists, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will sign two bills Friday intended to promote safety on two wheels in the city. One of the measures, which recently cleared the City Council, would require the use of bicycle-safe storm grates on any new roads in the city. The other would increase the fine for motorists who park in bicycle lanes. The council passed both measures after hearings in which dozens of advocates showed up to urge tougher measures to make the city more bicycle-friendly.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2005
LIKE MANY other neighborhoods in Howard County, Waverly Woods is concerned about motorists speeding through the community. Shannon Gillen, a community manager for First Real Estate Management, is excited about the innovative approach to traffic calming that the Waverly Woods homeowners association will try out soon. "Installing bike lanes is a great alternative to the traditional traffic humps and other measures that usually go in," she said. The bicycle lanes will be marked with lines, rather than a physical structure, but according to information she has obtained, lines are just as effective as other traffic-calming structures, such as chokers or speed humps, and a lot less expensive to maintain.
NEWS
December 14, 2003
Praising effort to cut racial scholastic gap The Anne Arundel County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) would like to go on record as expressing our strong support for the decision of School Superintendent Eric J. Smith to have Deborah Williams spearhead the efforts to close the scholastic achievement gap between white and minority students. Dr. Smith and the Board of Education are to be commended for taking a proactive approach toward addressing the systemic disparities that exist at Annapolis High School and other public schools in our county.
NEWS
By David Anderson and David Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
The State Highway Administration has begun work on projects designed to improve pedestrian safety along Harford Road in the Parkville-Carney area. The improvements, which crews started last week, are between the Baltimore City line and Joppa Road. They include new crosswalks and other traffic-calming measures, stop lines to show motorists approaching Harford Road on side streets where to stop, 4-foot-wide bicycle lanes and a new traffic light. Installation of the traffic light, at Harford and Emerald roads, will begin Dec. 1 and should be completed by early next year, said Lora Rakowski, a State Highway Administration spokeswoman.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 13, 2012
From time to time, the subject of having safe lanes or other thoroughfares where people can walk and ride their bikes in Harford County arises, and there's every reason to believe such community amenities would be well used. It isn't a new idea. The original pedestrian-friendly walkways are sidewalks, which have been around since the days when streets weren't paved and a lot of people walked. Sidewalks, be they brick, board or concrete, were elevated above the streets initially so the many folks who got around on their feet could avoid stepping in pollution left by the transportation engines of the day: horses and beasts of burden.
EXPLORE
August 21, 2012
In his letter to the Towson Times last week, Tom Rose took umbrage in this space over some concerns I voiced the week before about having bike lanes installed on heavily traveled roadways in Towson ("Bike beltway will be safe if cyclists and motorists respect rules of road. ") Unfortunately he was also critical of some views that I neither expressed nor hold. Mr. Rose is entitled to his own opinions, but he is not entitled to his own facts. I wrote in the first sentence of my letter that I believe cyclist have as much right to use the roadways as motorists, but Mr. Rose implied that I said the opposite.
NEWS
By Kory Dodd and Kory Dodd,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
Looking out of over Weems Creek toward the Rowe Boulevard bridge from the sliding glass doors in his bedroom, Evan Belaga is filled with a sense of excitement. As president of the Weems Creek Conservancy, Belaga has spent the past few years fighting to restore the sediment-clogged creek and lobbying the State Highway Administration to build a bridge that won't damage the Annapolis waterway. Belaga's goals may finally be realized after the state recently decided to spend more money to clean up the creek and revise construction plans for a new bridge, narrowing its width.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Anne Arundel County would create 215 miles of bicycle lanes and make pedestrian safety upgrades at 160 intersections over 15 years under a plan to be considered by the County Council next month. The county's first pedestrian and bicycle master plan was scheduled to be introduced at last night's County Council meeting, but it was postponed because of the snowstorm. There will not be money available for at least another year to begin the projects outlined in the plan, county planning officials cautioned.
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