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By McClatchy Newspapers | December 30, 2007
NAUDERO, Pakistan -- Benazir Bhutto left a last will and testament that maps out the future for her political party and who should lead it in her absence, her husband, Asif Zardari, disclosed yesterday. The document will be presented to her Pakistan People's Party today. It's expected to include her preference for who should lead the party in her absence. Zardari himself would be a highly controversial contender. Their son, Bilawal, would win a huge amount of goodwill but is still a teenager, and Zardari appeared to rule him out yesterday.
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NEWS
By Mustafa Malik | April 3, 2008
SYLHET, Bangladesh -- The new Pakistani prime minister is distancing his government from the U.S.-sponsored "war on terror" that President Pervez Musharraf carried on for six years. In so doing, Yousaf Raza Gillani is reviving a stance typically adopted by Pakistan's democratic regimes that succeeded pro-American dictatorships. "Dictators always supported American policy to make themselves accepted" internationally, Peshawar University anthropologist Jamil Ahmed told me during a recent trip through Pakistan's tribal areas.
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NEWS
December 23, 1993
Benazir Bhutto, the first woman to head the government of a Muslim country, is also the fourth, returning to office in Pakistan where she was deposed in 1990. Turkey and Bangladesh adopted woman prime ministers in the interim.She is the Pakistani politician who best communicates with the common people, many of whom revere her. She is the one who best communicates with the West, thanks to her Harvard and Oxford education. But she is the one who communicates worst with the army generals and religious mullahs, who may constitute the real, as opposed to apparent, government.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 25, 2008
ISLMABAD, Pakistan -- Deposed Chief Justice Iftikhar Mohammed Chaudhry, an icon of resistance to the rule of Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, emerged late yesterday from nearly five months of house arrest. He was freed as the first act of a Benazir Bhutto loyalist elected as prime minister hours earlier. It was the latest tumultuous twist in a Pakistani political saga that over the past year has seen the fall from grace of the U.S.-backed Musharraf, the Dec. 27 assassination of Bhutto and the triumph of her party in last month's elections.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
The attack: Former Pakistani prime minister and current opposition leader Benazir Bhutto was struck down 12 days before parliamentary elections as an unknown gunman opened fire and then blew himself up, killing 20 other people. The aftermath: Enraged crowds rioted across Pakistan. President Pervez Musharraf (left) reportedly weighed canceling the election as another opposition leader announced a boycott of the poll. PG 6A
NEWS
December 28, 2007
April 4, 1979: Benazir Bhutto's father, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, is executed for the murder of a political opponent, two years after his ouster as prime minister in a military coup. April 10, 1986: Benazir Bhutto returns from exile in London to lead the Pakistan People's Party, founded by her father. Dec. 1, 1988: Bhutto, age 35, wins parliamentary elections to become the first female prime minister of a Muslim nation. Aug. 6, 1990: President Ghulam Ishaq Khan dismisses Bhutto's government, citing corruption and a failure to control ethnic violence.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 11, 1990
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Asif Ali Zardari, the husband of ousted Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, was arrested yesterday in Karachi on charges of kidnapping a British businessman in April and extorting $800,000 from him.Mr. Zardari was denied bail by the Sind High Court, according to news agency reports.Mr. Zardari, a polo-playing businessman from a relatively obscure family in Sind province, where the Bhuttos are a powerful landowning clan, has emerged over the past year as Ms. Bhutto's gravest political liability.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 23, 1990
LAHORE, Pakistan -- A tumultuous procession of hundreds of thousands of Benazir Bhutto's supporters swept into this ancient city last night in a dramatic conclusion to Pakistan's bitterly fought national election campaign.Accompanied by shooting fireworks, blaring music and the exhaust of every imaginable kind of vehicle, the 14-hour-long, peaceful show of support began about 75 miles to the west in the city of Faisalbad and finally ended about 2 o'clock here this morning -- only because Pakistan's election laws mandated a cutoff on electioneering at midnight.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 20, 1990
GUJRAT, Pakistan -- Here in rural Punjab, where most of this country's voters live, Benazir Bhutto's political fate will probably be determined. And here, there is solid evidence that she has turned her uphill battle to become Pakistan's prime minister again into a horse race -- with maybe a tense photo finish.Along 200 miles of packed highway between Lahore and Islamabad this week, the red, black and green flags of her Pakistan People's Party fluttering over small settlements of earthen houses far outnumbered those of the Islami Jamhorri Ittehad, the main party within the conservative alliance opposing her.On the narrow streets of Gujrat, a large rural town halfway along the Punjab highway, many voters have dismissed, in interviews, the accusations of corruption and incompetence against Ms. Bhutto and are angered by what they perceive as a conspiracy of the rich and the military to negate the people's choice by dismissing her from office.
NEWS
By Laura King | December 28, 2007
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan-- --The assassination of Benazir Bhutto, the charismatic opposition leader who had promised to restore democracy in Pakistan, set off a nationwide wave of grief and fury and raised the specter of violent unrest that could threaten the government of U.S.-backed President Pervez Musharraf. At least 20 other people died in yesterday's assault just outside the main gates of a Rawalpindi park where Pakistan's first prime minister was assassinated in 1951. Bhutto's white SUV was hit by close-range gunfire, then rocked by a powerful explosion set off by a suicide attacker.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- The party of assassinated former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto picked a respected but lesser-known party leader yesterday as its candidate for prime minister, a move that analysts and some party insiders said could pave the way for Bhutto's widower to seek the job in a few months. Yousuf Raza Gillani, a former assembly speaker who spent more than four years in jail under President Pervez Musharraf, eclipsed Bhutto's deputy, Makhdoom Amin Fahim, who had been seen as the front-runner.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A new parliament dominated by foes of President Pervez Musharraf was inaugurated yesterday, ushering in what probably will be a concerted effort by the victorious opposition to curtail the near-total powers the Pakistani leader once held. The buoyant atmosphere, however, was dimmed by signs of potential disarray within the newly ascendant coalition formed by the two main opposition parties after they swept last month's parliamentary elections. The party of assassinated former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, which won the largest share of seats, has yet to put forth a candidate for prime minister.
NEWS
By Kaswar Klasra and John M. Glionna and Kaswar Klasra and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 21, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Authorities arrested two more alleged militants yesterday in connection with the recent assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. The arrests took place in Pakistan's mountainous North-West Frontier Province, where a teenage suspect and a man identified as his handler were taken into custody two days earlier. One of those arrested yesterday was identified as Mohammed Akram, from the Mansehra district. Authorities said videotape taken on the day Bhutto was slain showed Akram in front of her vehicle moments before she was killed, said an investigator who asked not to be identified.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 19, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The CIA thinks that Pakistani Taliban commander Baitullah Mahsud and his associates, some of them linked to al-Qaida, were responsible for the assassination of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto last month, a U.S. intelligence official said Thursday. "There are strong indications that Baitullah Mahsud was behind the Bhutto assassination," said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly. "There is certainly no reason to doubt that Mahsud was behind this."
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 12, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Two new reports on the assassination of Pakistani opposition leader Benazir Bhutto last month suggest that the killing might have been a plot rather than an isolated act of violence and that the government of President Pervez Musharraf knows far more than it has admitted. A police officer who witnessed the assassination said a mysterious crowd stopped Bhutto's car that day, prompting her to emerge through the sunroof. And a document has surfaced in the Pakistani news media that contradicts the government's version of her death and contains details on the pistol and the suicide bomb used in the assassination.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's senior national security advisers are debating whether to expand the authority of the CIA and the military to conduct far more aggressive covert operations in the tribal areas of Pakistan. The debate is in response to intelligence reports that al-Qaida and the Taliban are intensifying efforts to destabilize the Pakistani government, according to several senior administration officials. Vice President Dick Cheney, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, and a number of President Bush's top national security advisers met at the White House on Friday to discuss the proposal, part of a broad reassessment of American strategy after the assassination 10 days ago of Pakistan's opposition leader, Benazir Bhutto.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Refusing to apologize for Pakistan's nuclear weapons program, Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto demanded yesterday that her country be treated like a valued American ally and not be "cast aside" like a Cold War relic.Ms. Bhutto, who meets with President Clinton today, said Pakistan continues to pay a heavy price for its pro-Western policies -- maintaining Afghan war refugees on its soil and incurring more casualties than any other country in United Nations peacekeeping missions.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 19, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The CIA thinks that Pakistani Taliban commander Baitullah Mahsud and his associates, some of them linked to al-Qaida, were responsible for the assassination of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto last month, a U.S. intelligence official said Thursday. "There are strong indications that Baitullah Mahsud was behind the Bhutto assassination," said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly. "There is certainly no reason to doubt that Mahsud was behind this."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 5, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Scotland Yard investigators arrived yesterday in Pakistan to help investigate the assassination of Benazir Bhutto, although the extent of their mandate was unclear. The team of British anti-terrorism officers was dispatched after Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf, under intense criticism over the handling of the Bhutto probe, agreed to accept outside aid. Musharraf's government initially had rebuffed international participation of any kind in the Bhutto investigation.
NEWS
By Laura King and Henry Chu and Laura King and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 3, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Pummeled by international and domestic skepticism over his government's version of Benazir Bhutto's assassination, President Pervez Musharraf announced yesterday that Pakistan had invited Scotland Yard to help investigate the killing. In his first major address to the nation since Bhutto was slain Dec. 27, Musharraf also defended the decision to delay by six weeks parliamentary elections that were to have taken place next Tuesday. Rioting in the wake of Bhutto's death, he said, had left the security situation too precarious to proceed as scheduled.
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