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By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1991
The Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan plans to double gradually the number of tourists granted entry -- to 4,000 a year -- and this year will reduce the rates it charges tour operators by an average of about 13 percent.There will be bigger cuts in some tour categories like trekking, which will fall by about 27 percent in low season (December through February and in June), Bhutan has announced.The government of the tiny country bordered by India and China wants to privatize some sectors of the state-run tourist industry, starting with trekking, which is to be organized by three local companies.
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By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2008
PUNAKHA, Bhutan -- High in the Himalayas, above this peaceful valley where farmers till a patchwork of emerald-green fields, an icy lake fed by melting glaciers waits to become a "tsunami from the sky." The lake is swollen dangerously past normal levels, thanks to the global warming that is causing the glaciers to retreat at record speed. But no one knows when the tipping point will come and the lake can take no more, bursting its banks and sending torrents of water crashing into the valley below.
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By New York Times News Service | December 29, 1991
The tiny kingdom of Bhutan, which lies between India and Tibet in the Himalayas, has privatized its travel industry. Private travel companies now handle all travel arrangements, while the Tourist Authority of Bhutan authorizes visas.United States tour companies are: InnerAsia Expeditions, 2627 Lombard St., San Francisco, Calif. 94123, (800) 777-8183; and Bhutan Travel, 120 E. 56th St., New York, N.Y. 10022, (212) 838-6382.
NEWS
October 25, 2007
Mary E. "Muff" Imboden, a homemaker and volunteer, died of Alzheimer's disease Friday at her Ruxton home. She was 80. Mary Ellen Sawyers was born and raised in Centerville, Iowa, and was a 1945 graduate of St. Timothy's School, then in Catonsville. After earning a bachelor's degree from Vassar College in 1949, she married Dr. Robert Coffee, who died several months later. A resident of Ruxton since 1954, Mrs. Imboden was a longtime volunteer with the Baltimore Association for Mental Health and the Fellowship of Lights.
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By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2008
PUNAKHA, Bhutan -- High in the Himalayas, above this peaceful valley where farmers till a patchwork of emerald-green fields, an icy lake fed by melting glaciers waits to become a "tsunami from the sky." The lake is swollen dangerously past normal levels, thanks to the global warming that is causing the glaciers to retreat at record speed. But no one knows when the tipping point will come and the lake can take no more, bursting its banks and sending torrents of water crashing into the valley below.
NEWS
By Dexter Filkins and Dexter Filkins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 1999
UPPER GASELO, Bhutan -- As forests around the world vanish, this secluded Himalayan kingdom is mounting a desperate effort to hold onto its trees. Woodlands cover nearly three-quarters of Bhutan, a Switzerland-sized country nestled in the mountains between China and India. Surrounded by countries whose forests have been stripped, trampled and forgotten, Bhutan has embarked on one of the world's toughest environmental campaigns, aimed at preserving the country's spectacular natural bounty even at the cost of economic growth.
NEWS
By Michael Zielenziger and Michael Zielenziger,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 29, 2000
THIMPHU, Bhutan - Atop these windswept and unforgiving mountains, the world's last Buddhist kingdom has turned itself into a laboratory for a brave social experiment: Can a Spartan rural society join the high-tech world without surrendering its soul? Bhutan's enticing retort: Gross National Happiness. After centuries of self-imposed isolation, this postage stamp of a monarchy stuck between the Great Wall of China and India's Taj Mahal is slowly unlocking its doors to the outside, even as it refuses to cast aside its Buddhist identity and culture.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | June 5, 2005
Open to outsiders, Ha is worth a peek A Memorable Place By Laurette Poulos Simmons Special to the Sun It was amazing to see a story in the Travel section last year about visiting Bhutan, because travel to the country is so rare. My husband, LeRoy, and I recently returned from two weeks there, and like the writer last year, I agree that Bhutan is magical. Bhutan is nestled in the eastern Himalayas between China and India. The government, a monarchy, allows only about 9,000 visitors each year, and they must see the country on guided tours.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
The tiny Himalayan nation of Bhutan celebrated its 58th National Day last week in quite a stir over the unexpected announcement by its enlightened ruler, King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, that he would abdicate in favor of his son in 2008. At that time, the Buddhist kingdom's first parliamentary elections will be held, and the king will become subject to the parliament's approval. This is only the latest big change to come suddenly from on high for the Bhutanese, who until fairly recently were so isolated from the rest of the world by their mountains and sealed borders that their land was viewed abroad as a latter-day Shangri-La, the very last untouched place.
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By New York Times News Service | July 9, 1995
Q: In 1978 my wife and I went to Spain and visited El Chorro de Gargantua, or the Grand Canyon of Spain, north of Malaga, and found it to be an extraordinary experience. But no one we speak to has ever heard of it. Were we in the Twilight Zone?A: Your memory has got it almost right. What you have in mind is known as La Garganta del Chorro, and sometimes as the Gorge of Los Gaitanes.It is essentially a canyon that has been created between two mountains by the River Guadalhorce, with deep, perpendicular-sided ravines that can be reached only by way of a narrow footpath known as the King's Way.Access to the path, which has been worn away over the years and and should be approached with caution, is made by crossing a wooden footbridge that spans the canyon.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
The tiny Himalayan nation of Bhutan celebrated its 58th National Day last week in quite a stir over the unexpected announcement by its enlightened ruler, King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, that he would abdicate in favor of his son in 2008. At that time, the Buddhist kingdom's first parliamentary elections will be held, and the king will become subject to the parliament's approval. This is only the latest big change to come suddenly from on high for the Bhutanese, who until fairly recently were so isolated from the rest of the world by their mountains and sealed borders that their land was viewed abroad as a latter-day Shangri-La, the very last untouched place.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | June 5, 2005
Open to outsiders, Ha is worth a peek A Memorable Place By Laurette Poulos Simmons Special to the Sun It was amazing to see a story in the Travel section last year about visiting Bhutan, because travel to the country is so rare. My husband, LeRoy, and I recently returned from two weeks there, and like the writer last year, I agree that Bhutan is magical. Bhutan is nestled in the eastern Himalayas between China and India. The government, a monarchy, allows only about 9,000 visitors each year, and they must see the country on guided tours.
NEWS
By Michael Zielenziger and Michael Zielenziger,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 29, 2000
THIMPHU, Bhutan - Atop these windswept and unforgiving mountains, the world's last Buddhist kingdom has turned itself into a laboratory for a brave social experiment: Can a Spartan rural society join the high-tech world without surrendering its soul? Bhutan's enticing retort: Gross National Happiness. After centuries of self-imposed isolation, this postage stamp of a monarchy stuck between the Great Wall of China and India's Taj Mahal is slowly unlocking its doors to the outside, even as it refuses to cast aside its Buddhist identity and culture.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 25, 2000
"The Cup" is an extraordinary movie, for myriad reasons. It marks the directorial debut of Khyentse Norbu, a Tibetan Buddhist lama. It is the first film to be shot in Norbu's native Bhutan. It stars an ensemble of mostly amateur actors, many of them taken from the Chokling Monastery, a Tibetan refugee settlement in the Himalayan foothills. But given its spiritual and political pedigree, "The Cup" is even more extraordinary for being a simple tale, well told, about a group of monks who just want to watch the World Cup soccer finals.
NEWS
By Dexter Filkins and Dexter Filkins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 1999
UPPER GASELO, Bhutan -- As forests around the world vanish, this secluded Himalayan kingdom is mounting a desperate effort to hold onto its trees. Woodlands cover nearly three-quarters of Bhutan, a Switzerland-sized country nestled in the mountains between China and India. Surrounded by countries whose forests have been stripped, trampled and forgotten, Bhutan has embarked on one of the world's toughest environmental campaigns, aimed at preserving the country's spectacular natural bounty even at the cost of economic growth.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | July 9, 1995
Q: In 1978 my wife and I went to Spain and visited El Chorro de Gargantua, or the Grand Canyon of Spain, north of Malaga, and found it to be an extraordinary experience. But no one we speak to has ever heard of it. Were we in the Twilight Zone?A: Your memory has got it almost right. What you have in mind is known as La Garganta del Chorro, and sometimes as the Gorge of Los Gaitanes.It is essentially a canyon that has been created between two mountains by the River Guadalhorce, with deep, perpendicular-sided ravines that can be reached only by way of a narrow footpath known as the King's Way.Access to the path, which has been worn away over the years and and should be approached with caution, is made by crossing a wooden footbridge that spans the canyon.
NEWS
By Stephanie D. Moussalli | October 26, 1990
CHRISTOPHER FLAVIN, vice president for research of the Worldwatch Institute, an environmentalist think tank, recently went to the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan to advise the government on a ''sustainable development philosophy.'' He described his ideas in a recent article in the institute's World Watch magazine.''Sustainable development,'' he explains, is different from ''the single-minded approach to economic growth'' which has brought to ''many countries . . . not only falling water tables and choking pollution, but a decade of declining incomes and swelling bellies.
FEATURES
By Suzanna Stephens | March 19, 1995
Himalayan celebrationA16-day trip from Himalaya Trekking and Wilderness Expeditions focuses on the grand Paro Festival celebrating Tantric Buddhism in Bhutan, a small monarchy wedged between the high mountain peaks of the Himalayas and the jungles of India. Only a few thousand tourists are allowed to visit the country each year.Tour participants will explore historic fortresses, monasteries and temples by private vehicle as well as attend the ancient religious festival. The tour begins April 4 with a four-night stay and tours in Katmandu, Nepal; from there participants will fly to Bhutan for 12 days.
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