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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
RAE BARELI, India -- Like many Indian politicians, Atal Bihari Vajpayee, the man opinion polls say is favored for prime minister by more Indians than any other contender, runs chronically late for election rallies. So when he greeted a crowd that had waited three hours in 105-degree heat, Vajpayee had a practiced excuse."If I were prime minister I would have a proper jet, not a turboprop," he said. The remark set off chants from loyalists of the Bharatiya Janata Party, the Hindu nationalist group that opinion polls have predicted will take the largest number of seats in the general election that ends with a third round of voting on Tuesday.
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NEWS
May 14, 2004
THE LATEST version of the greatest show of electoral democracy on Earth - India's national parliamentary elections - led this week to a shocking upset for the Hindu nationalist party that has held sway in New Delhi for the last six years and that called the early vote in firm anticipation that it would win. Now expected are political deals that would return to power the Congress Party - with Italian-born Sonia Gandhi, somewhat incredibly, as the most...
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 1998
COIMBATORE, India -- India's general election came to a tense end yesterday as voters in this southern textile city joined 150 million others in choosing between Sonia Gandhi's vision of a secular India and a rival vision of a country dominated politically by the culture and preferences of its 700 million Hindus.When results begin flowing in Tuesday, India will know whether a seven-week election campaign produced a return to government by the Congress Party, whose frayed banner Gandhi carried, or a historic turn to the Hindu nationalists of the Bharatiya Janata Party.
NEWS
October 16, 1999
INDIAN PRIME MINISTER Atal Bihari Vajpayee and his Bharatiya Janata Party stand for Hindu identity and traditional, even reactionary, values. But the practical effect of their rule, is to modernize India, which may be the last thing they want culturally.By sweeping away the socialism and bureaucratism of a half-century of mostly Congress Party rule, Mr. Vajpayee and the BJP ushered in the free market and Asia's latest economic miracle.The next Vajpayee government will still be subject to regional party defection at any time on any issue, but looms stronger and stabler than Indian government has been lately.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 23, 1993
NEW DELHI, India -- New Delhi is a city under siege as it braces for an enormous demonstration by Hindu fundamentalists to be held Thursday.The government has banned the demonstration, and fears of violent confrontations between fervent Hindu militants and the police are sweeping the city even as security forces try to seal this capital off from the rest of India.Thousands of Hindu leaders and potential demonstrators are being rounded up by police, trains pulling into the city's three stations are being checked for Hindu protesters, and the roads into the capital have been sealed to motor caravans of Hindus militants.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 1993
NEW DELHI, India -- A day after about 100,000 police and paramilitary troops turned the heart of India's capital into an armed camp and fought thousands of anti-government Hindu activists with tear gas and bamboo batons, the city turned Friday to a more important matter: cricket.Televisions and radios in homes, sari shops, doctors' offices and street stalls were carefully tuned to the daylong cricket match in Bangalore that pitted India's finest against England's all-stars.That the country could turn its attention so quickly to bowlers and batsmen was perhaps the most telling sign that the threat to the embattled government of Prime Minister P. V. Narasimha Rao by the Hindu fundamentalist Bharatiya Janata Party had passed, at least for the moment.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
NEW DELHI, India -- A scramble for power among rival political groups continued yesterday in the wake of India's general election, with contenders from the Hindu nationalist right and the center-left both demanding the right to form a government and neither able to show the ability to command a parliamentary majority.Indians have never previously emerged from an election with so much confusion.About the only clear thing was that the new government would have at its heart politicians who have operated at the ideological poles of Indian politics -- right-wing nationalists who want to make India a Hindu state or left-wingers and Communists who still fly the hammer-and-sickle flag.
NEWS
March 13, 1998
THOSE WHO hoped recent elections would usher India into a period of political calm and stability have been disappointed -- again. The new lower house of parliament will be even more splintered. No fewer than 39 parties will divide the 543 seats, making frequent quarrels and stalemates a foregone conclusion.The main Hindu nationalist movement, the Bharatiya Janata Party, is trying to form a government. Since its 179 seats fell short of a majority, it needs to form and maintain a coalition with willing minor parties.
NEWS
May 4, 1996
THE LOGISTICS of India's election defy the imagination. The electorate is some 590-million strong, nearly half illiterate. People vote on ballots with varied languages and picture symbols. Their voting is usually as informed and intelligent as anywhere. The turnout will exceed 60 percent and results are not due till May 10.Yes, there are arrests and sporadic violence. But by comparison with most countries, the election is remarkably fair and free. Voters are disillusioned with the Congress Party that always said it was for the poor and disgusted with its corruption.
NEWS
October 16, 1999
INDIAN PRIME MINISTER Atal Bihari Vajpayee and his Bharatiya Janata Party stand for Hindu identity and traditional, even reactionary, values. But the practical effect of their rule, is to modernize India, which may be the last thing they want culturally.By sweeping away the socialism and bureaucratism of a half-century of mostly Congress Party rule, Mr. Vajpayee and the BJP ushered in the free market and Asia's latest economic miracle.The next Vajpayee government will still be subject to regional party defection at any time on any issue, but looms stronger and stabler than Indian government has been lately.
NEWS
March 13, 1998
THOSE WHO hoped recent elections would usher India into a period of political calm and stability have been disappointed -- again. The new lower house of parliament will be even more splintered. No fewer than 39 parties will divide the 543 seats, making frequent quarrels and stalemates a foregone conclusion.The main Hindu nationalist movement, the Bharatiya Janata Party, is trying to form a government. Since its 179 seats fell short of a majority, it needs to form and maintain a coalition with willing minor parties.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 1998
COIMBATORE, India -- India's general election came to a tense end yesterday as voters in this southern textile city joined 150 million others in choosing between Sonia Gandhi's vision of a secular India and a rival vision of a country dominated politically by the culture and preferences of its 700 million Hindus.When results begin flowing in Tuesday, India will know whether a seven-week election campaign produced a return to government by the Congress Party, whose frayed banner Gandhi carried, or a historic turn to the Hindu nationalists of the Bharatiya Janata Party.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
NEW DELHI, India -- A scramble for power among rival political groups continued yesterday in the wake of India's general election, with contenders from the Hindu nationalist right and the center-left both demanding the right to form a government and neither able to show the ability to command a parliamentary majority.Indians have never previously emerged from an election with so much confusion.About the only clear thing was that the new government would have at its heart politicians who have operated at the ideological poles of Indian politics -- right-wing nationalists who want to make India a Hindu state or left-wingers and Communists who still fly the hammer-and-sickle flag.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
RAE BARELI, India -- Like many Indian politicians, Atal Bihari Vajpayee, the man opinion polls say is favored for prime minister by more Indians than any other contender, runs chronically late for election rallies. So when he greeted a crowd that had waited three hours in 105-degree heat, Vajpayee had a practiced excuse."If I were prime minister I would have a proper jet, not a turboprop," he said. The remark set off chants from loyalists of the Bharatiya Janata Party, the Hindu nationalist group that opinion polls have predicted will take the largest number of seats in the general election that ends with a third round of voting on Tuesday.
NEWS
May 4, 1996
THE LOGISTICS of India's election defy the imagination. The electorate is some 590-million strong, nearly half illiterate. People vote on ballots with varied languages and picture symbols. Their voting is usually as informed and intelligent as anywhere. The turnout will exceed 60 percent and results are not due till May 10.Yes, there are arrests and sporadic violence. But by comparison with most countries, the election is remarkably fair and free. Voters are disillusioned with the Congress Party that always said it was for the poor and disgusted with its corruption.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 1993
NEW DELHI, India -- A day after about 100,000 police and paramilitary troops turned the heart of India's capital into an armed camp and fought thousands of anti-government Hindu activists with tear gas and bamboo batons, the city turned Friday to a more important matter: cricket.Televisions and radios in homes, sari shops, doctors' offices and street stalls were carefully tuned to the daylong cricket match in Bangalore that pitted India's finest against England's all-stars.That the country could turn its attention so quickly to bowlers and batsmen was perhaps the most telling sign that the threat to the embattled government of Prime Minister P. V. Narasimha Rao by the Hindu fundamentalist Bharatiya Janata Party had passed, at least for the moment.
NEWS
By SHIV CARIAPPA | May 19, 1991
India, the world's most populous democracy, could best be described as a fragile mosaic perennially threatened by disintegration. From tomorrow until next Sunday, its more than 400 million voters will choose a new government to deal with the country's social and political ferment.The coming general elections underscore a central paradox of Indian democracy. In this wildly heterogeneous country, elections serve to maintain the union by satisfying its disparate elements. But the democratic process also accentuates the very forces -- communalism, casteism, separatism and religious divisions -- that could shatter Indian society.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
THE LATEST version of the greatest show of electoral democracy on Earth - India's national parliamentary elections - led this week to a shocking upset for the Hindu nationalist party that has held sway in New Delhi for the last six years and that called the early vote in firm anticipation that it would win. Now expected are political deals that would return to power the Congress Party - with Italian-born Sonia Gandhi, somewhat incredibly, as the most...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 23, 1993
NEW DELHI, India -- New Delhi is a city under siege as it braces for an enormous demonstration by Hindu fundamentalists to be held Thursday.The government has banned the demonstration, and fears of violent confrontations between fervent Hindu militants and the police are sweeping the city even as security forces try to seal this capital off from the rest of India.Thousands of Hindu leaders and potential demonstrators are being rounded up by police, trains pulling into the city's three stations are being checked for Hindu protesters, and the roads into the capital have been sealed to motor caravans of Hindus militants.
NEWS
May 25, 1991
India is on hold. The refusal of the widow Sonia Gandhi to accept titular leadership of the Congress Party forces it to choose new leadership. Postponement of the rest of the election until mid-June gives the party time. But that creaky political machine may not be up to the job.The Congress Party is a century old and founded the modern Indian state, now 844 million diverse people, as a tolerant and pluralist democracy. And yet the party has been at the top little more than a Nehru-Gandhi family dynasty.
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