Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBfi
IN THE NEWS

Bfi

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Grant Ferrier and Grant Ferrier,Environmental Business Publishing Inc. Dist. by Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 12, 1991
Solid waste management was initially thought to be the most recession-resistant segment of the environmental industry.Surely even an economic downturn could not stem the tide of the millions of tons of garbage generated by Americans each year.However, the first returns showing that a large environmental company was having trouble came from none other than Browning-Ferris Industries Inc. of Houston, the $3 billion refuse hauler and landfill operator.BFI's 1990 fourth-quarter results were disappointing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 1998
Taneytown City Council has awarded a three-year contract for trash removal to BFI, a move that will save the city about $20 per ton of garbage.BFI will transport the city's trash to a private landfill in Greencastle, Pa., instead of the Carroll County landfill. The contract becomes effective July 1.The Pennsylvania landfill charges $28.25 per ton, compared with the $47 per ton that will be charged at the county landfill beginning July 1. The County Commissioners recently raised the rate $2 a ton.BFI will charge the city an average of $5.59 a month per customer to collect trash and recyclable materials.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1995
An Anne Arundel County man who says his land has been poisoned by Browning-Ferris Industries' leaking hazardous waste landfill on Solley Road is contesting a decision by state regulators to give the waste hauler permission to reseal part of the site."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 12, 1998
HOUSTON -- USA Waste Services Inc. agreed yesterday to buy Waste Management Inc. for $20 billion in stock and assumed debt, combining two of the three largest U.S. waste-disposal companies to cut costs and boost earnings.USA Waste will pay 0.725 share for each Waste Management share, valuing Waste Management at $28.37 each, a 13 percent premium to Tuesday's closing price. Waste Management shareholders will own 60 percent of the combined company, which will be called Waste Management but be based in Houston and led by USA Waste Chief Executive Officer John Drury.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
Cancer-causing solvents have leaked from a hazardous waste landfill off Solley Road and crossed Marley Neck Boulevard to a point about 1,650 feet from Marley Creek, according to the landfill owner's consultant.The creek, closed to swimming for more than two decades due to other pollution, flows into Chesapeake Bay.The consultant, Summit Environmental Consultants Inc. of Auburn, Maine, issued a map dated Oct. 21 showing that an underground stream of water polluted with volatile organic chemicals had seeped past the landfill's boundaries.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
The nation's second-largest waste handler was sued for $100 million this week in federal court by a man who says its Solley Road landfill has contaminated his adjacent land with hazardous waste so badly that he cannot develop it.John C. Blumenthal, whose Blumenthal Power Co. Inc. owns 145 acres between the closed landfill and Marley Creek, has proposed building a 738-home subdivision on the site. But cancer-causing chemicals from the landfill, owned by Browning Ferris Industries, have turned up in test wells on his property.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
The owner of a leaking hazardous waste landfill near Glen Burnie has agreed to test residential wells east of the site, after a contentious meeting with Marley Neck homeowners.Although details of the program must be worked out, residents are asking for tests every six months. Susan Wienand, project manager for Browning-Ferris Industries, owner of the landfill that closed in 1982, said the company will consider doing one or two tests on the wells and draft a written agreement for the community.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | December 20, 1994
The owner of a leaking hazardous waste landfill yesterday agreed to pay for an outside engineering consultant because people who live near the landfill don't believe the company will properly clean up the site."
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1996
Bucking a prominent trend, Browning Ferris Industries Inc., one of the nation's largest waste-management companies, has moved its district headquarters -- and 139 jobs -- from Baltimore County to Baltimore City.BFI's district office, which serves customers in Baltimore City and Baltimore, Harford, Howard and Carroll counties, in July moved from its plant at 68th Street and Pulaski Highway to a new South Baltimore waterfront facility.Company executives will join Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke Friday for a ribbon-cutting ceremony.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1997
Elkridge residents and businesses may not even know a proposed 17-acre waste transfer station is in their midst because of extensive landscaping plans intended to hide the much-opposed facility, an urban planner testified at a Zoning Board hearing last week.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the Howard County Council, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve the station off U.S. 1 on Cemetery Lane in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.A 12-foot berm and other landscaping plans will create an "envelop around the property to provide screening" for surrounding residences, shopping centers and business parks, said Alfred Blumberg, a Rockville planner hired by BFI.He was one of three witnesses BFI's attorney presented Thursday in a case that will continue for at least four more hearings next month.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
The Howard County Zoning Board is flirting with a Wednesdaydeadline to sign an order finalizing the panel's July 17 denial of a plan by Browning-Ferris Industries to build a solid-waste trash transfer station on a 17-acre site in Elkridge.If the formal document is not signed, officials from the Houston-based BFI would be allowed to re-present closing arguments for the controversial facility.But Paul Johnson, an attorney with the county's Office of Law vTC who advises the Zoning Board, said he has submitted the decision and order to the panel and expects board members to sign it."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1997
After four years of lobbying and seven months of hearings, the Howard County Zoning Board voted yesterday to deny a plan by Browning Ferris Industries to build a solid-waste trash transfer station on a 17-acre site in Elkridge.C. Vernon Gray was the lone board member who voted to permit the facility, which was denied on the basis that there was no compelling reason for it.The 4-1 decision -- surprising in that two of the five board members voted three years ago to encourage construction of the facility -- pleased residents who feared the project would lower property values and endanger their health.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
As the long-running dispute over a proposed trash transfer station in Elkridge draws to a close, the attorney for a waste-management company tried last night to undo any damage that opponents' testimony may have caused.At issue is a proposal by Browning-Ferris Industries to build a transfer station on 17 acres on Cemetery Lane, where the company operates a recycling center. At the transfer station, trash would be prepared and loaded onto trucks to be taken to landfills.On July 17, attorneys will give closing arguments, said Howard County Councilman Darrel E. Drown, chairman of the Zoning Board.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
The Howard County Zoning Board encouraged attorneys on both sides of a long-running dispute over a proposed trash transfer station in Elkridge to end their cases by next week.Two more hearing dates -- June 2 and June 4 -- have been set in the case that began in January.County Councilman Darrel E. Drown, who is chairman of the Zoning Board, said he would like the board to decide the matter in July. The council recesses for the month of August."It is our expressed goal and desire to be finished by the middle of July -- of this year, please," Drown told the attorneys at the start of last night's hearings.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1997
A landscape architect and planning expert said last night he finds no compelling reason to build a trash transfer station on 17 acres in Elkridge and has many more reasons why the plan should be rejected by the Howard County Zoning Board.Browning-Ferris Industries proposes to build the transfer station on Cemetery Lane, where the waste-management company operates a recycling center. At the transfer station, trash would be consolidated and prepared for transport to a landfill.Last night, attorneys for opponents of the transfer station presented Mark Wendland, a senior associate and landscape architect for LDR International in Columbia, as an expert witness to refute BFI's claim that the proposed site is suitable for the transfer station.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
Odor, dust, litter, rodents and increased traffic.That would be the future of the U.S. 1 corridor if an Elkridge waste transfer station is built, residents, ministers and developers told the Howard County Zoning Board last night.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the board to approve the transfer station -- where trash would be consolidated and prepared for transport to a landfill -- to be built on a 17-acre site on Cemetery Lane, where the waste-management company operates a recycling center.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1995
Neighbors of a closed hazardous-waste landfill where environmental protections have failed told state officials last night that they want the Solley Road facility resealed but that they also doubt the effectiveness of the steps the landfill's owner has proposed to stop the spread of cancer-causing contaminants."
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
It could cost Howard County more money to ship its trash to Anne Arundel County if a proposed transfer station in Elkridge is not approved, said representatives of a waste-management company at a Zoning Board hearing last night.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the board to approve the transfer station to be built on a 17-acre site on Cemetery Lane off U.S. 1 in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.On Monday, the county began shipping its residential waste to an Annapolis Junction transfer station -- 5 miles from the proposed BFI site -- owned by Houston-based USA Waste, which then trucks the trash to a landfill in King George, Va.The county's three-year, $3.6 million contract with USA Waste calls for a $33 tipping fee for each ton of residential trash disposed of there.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1997
Elkridge residents and businesses may not even know a proposed 17-acre waste transfer station is in their midst because of extensive landscaping plans intended to hide the much-opposed facility, an urban planner testified at a Zoning Board hearing last week.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the Howard County Council, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve the station off U.S. 1 on Cemetery Lane in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.A 12-foot berm and other landscaping plans will create an "envelop around the property to provide screening" for surrounding residences, shopping centers and business parks, said Alfred Blumberg, a Rockville planner hired by BFI.He was one of three witnesses BFI's attorney presented Thursday in a case that will continue for at least four more hearings next month.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.