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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 15, 1993
Crude, that is."The Beverly Hillbillies," Penelope Spheeris' loving tribute to the amiable mid-'60s hillbillies-in-pig-heaven television series, will win no awards for subtlety, sophistication, delicacy or refinement. But it doesn't have to.Set square in a brightly lit idiot universe, it's about good-hearted people whose innocent ignorance turns everything they touch or every word they utter into massive chaos. Trusting, sweet, slow to take offense, loyal to a fault, the dead-on literalness of their earnestness makes them catastrophic comic lightning rods in a faster, slicker, more provisional world.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 8, 2003
Buddy Ebsen was not a seminal television performer like Milton Berle or a pioneering figure like Roone Arledge, but he came to embody a persona so attractive to viewers that for a run of 17 years, there was no actor on television who attracted a larger audience week in and week out. The two characters he played from 1962 to 1980 - Jed Clampett in The Beverly Hillbillies and then Barnaby Jones in the detective drama of the same name - were seen in an...
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FEATURES
By Ron Miller and Ron Miller,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 25, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Hollywood's rush to revive old TV shows as big-screen blockbusters hasn't run out of gas yet. In fact, it may be shifting into overdrive.Warner Brothers this week announced that Mel Gibson, one of the movies' top box-office stars, will play reluctant western hero Bret Maverick in a studio version of "Maverick." The film may feature the original Bret, actor James Garner, in a major supporting role. Richard Donner, who directed Mr. Gibson in the three highly successful "Lethal Weapon" movies, will direct the picture.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - This Beverly Hillbillies thing just won't go away. And if you wonder what "thing" I'm referring to, well: "Come and listen to my story about a guy named Les, the man in charge over there at CBS." Sorry, couldn't resist. Anyway, Les Moonves is the CBS CEO. In August, his network announced plans to air something it called The Real Beverly Hillbillies, a twist on the old sitcom about bumpkins from the Ozarks who struck oil, so they loaded up the truck and they moved to Beverly.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 18, 1994
The season premieres of "Nova" and "Frontline" arrive tonight, but NBC and ABC have the most indispensable offerings: "Frasier" and "NYPD Blue," respectively.* "Nova: Secret of the Wild Child." (8-9 p.m., WMPT, Channel 22 and Channel 67) -- One secret regarding this "wild child," a 13-year-old girl cruelly isolated from almost all human contact until her rescue by social workers in 1970, is that the hundreds of hours of videotape detailing her rehabilitation were almost lost to deterioration caused by poor storage.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 8, 2003
Buddy Ebsen was not a seminal television performer like Milton Berle or a pioneering figure like Roone Arledge, but he came to embody a persona so attractive to viewers that for a run of 17 years, there was no actor on television who attracted a larger audience week in and week out. The two characters he played from 1962 to 1980 - Jed Clampett in The Beverly Hillbillies and then Barnaby Jones in the detective drama of the same name - were seen in an...
NEWS
By Paul R. Schlitz Jr | January 18, 1995
AT CYNICAL moments I've thought casually about Sparks Elementary School burning down last week. I've told friends it was a 30-year time lag of a wish fulfillment or where (to quote Philip Larkin) my childhood was unspent.But the pleasant memories out weigh the cynicism. As a child, I thought all public schools were like Sparks, graced with ornamented cathedral ceilings, 30-foot high windows, masonry interiors and real cows sometime invading recess and the ball field. It wasn't until adulthood that I realized most of my contemporaries grew up in Levittownian school complexes similar in design to many factories.
FEATURES
By Heather Svokos and Heather Svokos,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 8, 2003
LEXINGTON, Ky. - Ever since CBS announced in August its plans for a reality show based on The Beverly Hillbillies, people in the Appalachian community have been crying foul. Yesterday, they hoped to knock the show - and the stereotype - right out of the park. With quarter-page ads in The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Cincinnati Enquirer, the Center for Rural Strategies in Whitesburg, Ky., has officially launched its campaign to try to derail The Real Beverly Hillbillies.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 8, 2002
DEAR CBS Television: I've got this pal. Native of the Appalachian Mountains in North Carolina. Among her friends, she's been known to refer to herself as "Hill Mama." And that dialect she speaks? Well, that's "Hill-bonics." Which is appropriate, because it really is like another language. I remember once, we got into a discussion about something she called "pah." It took the longest time to figure out that she was referring to that dessert that is sometimes eaten a la mode. Anyway, I started thinking about Hill Mama when I heard about your plan to revive the old Beverly Hillbillies sitcom as a reality show.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - This Beverly Hillbillies thing just won't go away. And if you wonder what "thing" I'm referring to, well: "Come and listen to my story about a guy named Les, the man in charge over there at CBS." Sorry, couldn't resist. Anyway, Les Moonves is the CBS CEO. In August, his network announced plans to air something it called The Real Beverly Hillbillies, a twist on the old sitcom about bumpkins from the Ozarks who struck oil, so they loaded up the truck and they moved to Beverly.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | January 26, 2003
SAN DIEGO - Now that we've gotten through all the subplots like Jon Gruden vs. Bill Callahan, the Oakland geriatrics and the vagabond quarterbacks, and have heard from owners who still wear black leather jump suits (Al Davis) and who remind you of the Clampetts from The Beverly Hillbillies (the Glazers in Tampa), it's time to move on to the bottom line of Super Bowl XXXVII. If the fat boys on Oakland's offensive line can snack on Tampa Bay like a good, old Philly cheese steak and eventually wear down the Bucs at the end of three quarters, the Raiders will win tonight.
FEATURES
By Heather Svokos and Heather Svokos,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 8, 2003
LEXINGTON, Ky. - Ever since CBS announced in August its plans for a reality show based on The Beverly Hillbillies, people in the Appalachian community have been crying foul. Yesterday, they hoped to knock the show - and the stereotype - right out of the park. With quarter-page ads in The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Cincinnati Enquirer, the Center for Rural Strategies in Whitesburg, Ky., has officially launched its campaign to try to derail The Real Beverly Hillbillies.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 8, 2002
DEAR CBS Television: I've got this pal. Native of the Appalachian Mountains in North Carolina. Among her friends, she's been known to refer to herself as "Hill Mama." And that dialect she speaks? Well, that's "Hill-bonics." Which is appropriate, because it really is like another language. I remember once, we got into a discussion about something she called "pah." It took the longest time to figure out that she was referring to that dessert that is sometimes eaten a la mode. Anyway, I started thinking about Hill Mama when I heard about your plan to revive the old Beverly Hillbillies sitcom as a reality show.
NEWS
By Paul R. Schlitz Jr | January 18, 1995
AT CYNICAL moments I've thought casually about Sparks Elementary School burning down last week. I've told friends it was a 30-year time lag of a wish fulfillment or where (to quote Philip Larkin) my childhood was unspent.But the pleasant memories out weigh the cynicism. As a child, I thought all public schools were like Sparks, graced with ornamented cathedral ceilings, 30-foot high windows, masonry interiors and real cows sometime invading recess and the ball field. It wasn't until adulthood that I realized most of my contemporaries grew up in Levittownian school complexes similar in design to many factories.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 18, 1994
The season premieres of "Nova" and "Frontline" arrive tonight, but NBC and ABC have the most indispensable offerings: "Frasier" and "NYPD Blue," respectively.* "Nova: Secret of the Wild Child." (8-9 p.m., WMPT, Channel 22 and Channel 67) -- One secret regarding this "wild child," a 13-year-old girl cruelly isolated from almost all human contact until her rescue by social workers in 1970, is that the hundreds of hours of videotape detailing her rehabilitation were almost lost to deterioration caused by poor storage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 15, 1993
Crude, that is."The Beverly Hillbillies," Penelope Spheeris' loving tribute to the amiable mid-'60s hillbillies-in-pig-heaven television series, will win no awards for subtlety, sophistication, delicacy or refinement. But it doesn't have to.Set square in a brightly lit idiot universe, it's about good-hearted people whose innocent ignorance turns everything they touch or every word they utter into massive chaos. Trusting, sweet, slow to take offense, loyal to a fault, the dead-on literalness of their earnestness makes them catastrophic comic lightning rods in a faster, slicker, more provisional world.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 18, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Deja Vu, Part One: Yes, that is Donna Hamilton you may be seeing in a series of 60-second informational spots which are now showing periodically on cable's Discovery Channel.The former host of WJZ-Channel 13's "Evening Magazine," who left the station earlier this year to work in her own production company, taped 10 "Women of the World" segments exploring the evolving roles of women in India, Japan, Russia, Poland and elsewhere.* Deja Vu, Part Two: Cable viewers may think that comic Kevin Meaney also looks vaguely familiar in the premiere of his new stand-up show this weekend (at 10 p.m. Saturday on HBO)
FEATURES
By Joe Rhodes and Joe Rhodes,Contributing Writer | August 8, 1993
Los Angeles --There's a break on the set of "The Beverly Hillbillies," 20th Century Fox's $25 million feature film version of the 1960's CBS sitcom, and Jim Varney, the man who would be Jed Clampett, is sitting out with the extras by the cement pond, smoking a cigarette, drinking coffee and looking not the least little bit like Buddy Ebsen. He's got a dark caterpillar of a mustache, for one thing, brown hair curling over his ears and down to the collar of his bolo-tied shirt. He's wearing a western-cut Hank Williams suit, with charcoal-gray pinstripes and pointy black boots.
FEATURES
By Joe Rhodes and Joe Rhodes,Contributing Writer | August 8, 1993
Los Angeles --There's a break on the set of "The Beverly Hillbillies," 20th Century Fox's $25 million feature film version of the 1960's CBS sitcom, and Jim Varney, the man who would be Jed Clampett, is sitting out with the extras by the cement pond, smoking a cigarette, drinking coffee and looking not the least little bit like Buddy Ebsen. He's got a dark caterpillar of a mustache, for one thing, brown hair curling over his ears and down to the collar of his bolo-tied shirt. He's wearing a western-cut Hank Williams suit, with charcoal-gray pinstripes and pointy black boots.
FEATURES
By Ron Miller and Ron Miller,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 25, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Hollywood's rush to revive old TV shows as big-screen blockbusters hasn't run out of gas yet. In fact, it may be shifting into overdrive.Warner Brothers this week announced that Mel Gibson, one of the movies' top box-office stars, will play reluctant western hero Bret Maverick in a studio version of "Maverick." The film may feature the original Bret, actor James Garner, in a major supporting role. Richard Donner, who directed Mr. Gibson in the three highly successful "Lethal Weapon" movies, will direct the picture.
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