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NEWS
December 27, 2012
Ellen Valentino and the beverage Industry are entitled to their own opinions but not their own facts ("Ulman drink ban is heavy-handed," Dec. 18). Ms. Valentino's assertion that the beverage industry has "voluntarily removed full-calorie soft drinks from schools in Howard County" is simply not true. Walk into many county middle schools and high schools and you will see rows of vending machines offering an assortment of full calorie drinks. Some school vending machines even sell 20-ounce full-calorie drinks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 17, 2014
I was phoned the other night in middle of dinner by an earnest young man named Spencer, who said he was doing a survey. Rather than hang up, I agreed to answer his questions. He asked me if I knew a soda tax would be on the ballot in Berkeley, Calif. in November. When I said yes, he then asked whether I trusted the Berkeley city government to spend the revenues wisely. At that moment I recognized a classic "push poll," which is part of a paid political campaign. So I asked Spencer a couple of questions of my own. Who was financing his survey?
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NEWS
December 18, 2012
It is troubling that Howard County Executive Ken Ulman can dictate what people can eat and drink on county property ("Howard bans sale of sugary drinks on county property," Dec. 12). Last week, Mr. Ulman unilaterally banned the sale of certain beverages on all county properties, including recreation centers, government offices, parks and police and fire stations. We agree that obesity is a serious problem. But we disagree with Mr. Ulman's heavy-handed tactics. Why not give the residents of Howard County, whose tax money pays for the upkeep of county properties, the dignity to think for themselves?
NEWS
October 26, 2013
We agree with The Sun's editors that obesity is one of the country's most serious health issues ( "A new kind of cola war," Oct. 22). However, targeting soda alone, absent a focus on actions and efforts to achieve healthier diets and lifestyles, will not result in our collective goal of healthier communities. To manage weight, most experts agree the key is an active, healthy lifestyle. There are many factors that underpin these three words, but I will focus on two - a balanced, sensible diet and regular physical activity.
FEATURES
By Linda Giuca and Linda Giuca,The Hartford Courant | June 2, 1993
Clear. Fruity. Sweet. Effervescent. Look how far that most basic of thirst-quenchers -- water -- has come.Bottled spring waters gained popularity in the 1970s, but the '90s will be known for a new twist: sweetened sparkling H20 infused with fruit flavors such as key lime, peach and black cherry.These refreshers are racking up impressive sales in a category the beverage industry calls "New Age" drinks."New Age is virtually anything non-alcoholic that isn't a traditional soft drink -- that is, not a dark cola, lemon-lime, root beer or flavor line such as grape or orange," says Greg Prince, senior editor of Beverage World magazine, "and has a 'sheen' to it, meaning, essentially, it reeks of newness, freshness and 'betterness.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 25, 2013
A bill meant to boost recycling of drink cans and bottles by charging a nickel deposit on them died in the House Environmental Matters Committee Monday. The measure, HB1085 , sponsored by the committee's chairwoman, Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore city Democrat, had the backing of environmental groups, who noted that states with similar container deposit laws had much higher recycling rates than those without. McIntosh touted the bill as a new, improved version of the bottle deposit legislation that was repeatedly pushed - and defeated - years ago in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2003
A bill that would allow the transfer of six liquor licenses to central Towson got a lukewarm reception yesterday from Baltimore County senators, who applauded the goal of revitalizing the county seat but questioned how much proponents had consulted licensees. The bill, sponsored by Sen. James Brochin, a Towson Democrat, and supported by County Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, is part of what they call a holistic effort to make Towson an attractive shopping and dining destination. They told the county's senatorial delegation yesterday that they are working to clean up blighted properties, increase parking and provide tax incentives, but that developers won't be interested in the area unless they know they will be able to get liquor licenses.
NEWS
June 9, 2010
Thanks to the gutless city council, all of the advertising money spent by the beverage industry has paid off by defeating the bottle tax. Instead of a tax that would at least partially (if not mostly) raise money from people coming into the city and on goods that are either not good for your health (sugar drinks) or for the environment (plastic bottles), now we have a plan with more taxes that affect only residents. We have an increase in the income tax rate, increase on telephone line taxes, and a reduction to early property tax payment discounts.
NEWS
June 18, 1991
Du Burns' principled opposition to the controversial container tax is, no doubt, genuine. But as a candidate for mayor in the Democratic primary, there is certainly also a political dimension to the Schmoke-bashing ads in which Burns has been appearing recently -- ads, incidentally, which the beverage industry, not Burns or his campaign committee, is paying for.Burns' charges in the ads that the container tax is unfair. That certainly is within the bounds of responsible debate. But the fact that the ads are paid for by the beverage industry is suspect.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
The beverage industry is claiming victory after a New York City judge on Monday overturned a ban on super-size sodas and sugary drinks Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg had championed as a way to combat obesity among residents. But the battle is hardly over. Mr. Bloomberg, whose campaign against sales of such drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces became one of the signature public health initiatives of his administration, has garnered worldwide attention for his efforts and in the process amplified the conversation about the link between sweetened drinks and obesity that likely will go on long after he leaves office at the end of this year.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 25, 2013
A bill meant to boost recycling of drink cans and bottles by charging a nickel deposit on them died in the House Environmental Matters Committee Monday. The measure, HB1085 , sponsored by the committee's chairwoman, Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore city Democrat, had the backing of environmental groups, who noted that states with similar container deposit laws had much higher recycling rates than those without. McIntosh touted the bill as a new, improved version of the bottle deposit legislation that was repeatedly pushed - and defeated - years ago in Annapolis.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
The beverage industry is claiming victory after a New York City judge on Monday overturned a ban on super-size sodas and sugary drinks Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg had championed as a way to combat obesity among residents. But the battle is hardly over. Mr. Bloomberg, whose campaign against sales of such drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces became one of the signature public health initiatives of his administration, has garnered worldwide attention for his efforts and in the process amplified the conversation about the link between sweetened drinks and obesity that likely will go on long after he leaves office at the end of this year.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
You know the beverage industry is running scared when it feels driven to mount an all-out campaign against a New York City law passed last year banning the sale of super-size sodas and sugary drinks. But it's beyond shameless when that effort includes arm-twisting support for its cause from a group representing the very people who would benefit most from the law. Yet that's what played out in a New York courtroom last week, when the city's NAACP branch took the industry's side by arguing that the ban on sugary drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces, which was strongly endorsed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, would unfairly hurt residents in African-American communities.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Ellen Valentino and the beverage Industry are entitled to their own opinions but not their own facts ("Ulman drink ban is heavy-handed," Dec. 18). Ms. Valentino's assertion that the beverage industry has "voluntarily removed full-calorie soft drinks from schools in Howard County" is simply not true. Walk into many county middle schools and high schools and you will see rows of vending machines offering an assortment of full calorie drinks. Some school vending machines even sell 20-ounce full-calorie drinks.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
It is troubling that Howard County Executive Ken Ulman can dictate what people can eat and drink on county property ("Howard bans sale of sugary drinks on county property," Dec. 12). Last week, Mr. Ulman unilaterally banned the sale of certain beverages on all county properties, including recreation centers, government offices, parks and police and fire stations. We agree that obesity is a serious problem. But we disagree with Mr. Ulman's heavy-handed tactics. Why not give the residents of Howard County, whose tax money pays for the upkeep of county properties, the dignity to think for themselves?
NEWS
December 12, 2012
Howard County's new ban on the sale of sugary drinks on government property won't solve the obesity epidemic. It won't prevent Howard Countians from slurping down empty calories by the Big Gulpful. It won't stop them from eating things that are even more unhealthy, and it won't get them to exercise. But the ban, announced Tuesday by County Executive Ken Ulman, is a step toward aligning the wares available at libraries, parks and office buildings with what the county's health department recommends about a healthy lifestyle, and for that reason alone it is worthwhile.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | July 3, 1991
After years of debate and countless delays, the Food and Drug Administration has proposed labeling rules that would tell consumers a lot more than many beverage makers usually reveal about what is in their juice drinks, juice cocktails and even wine coolers.As framed, the new regulations would force beverage makers to list on the side of their containers not only the total amount of juice in their products but specific percentages of each juice used in a blended drink.The proposed rules would also crack down on existing labeling practices that allow juice makers to, say, advertise a raspberry juice drink as "100 percent juice" when it might consist of a small amount of raspberry juice and a large dose of less costly apple or grape juice that has been stripped of its taste and color.
EXPLORE
October 31, 2011
In an effort focused on grabbing headlines, County Executive Ken Ulman recently called for a 30-day boycott of soft drinks, completely missing an opportunity to educate and talk to the public about real solutions for addressing obesity. Now more than ever the commitment of Maryland's beverage industry to do our part is shining through. Our member companies are cutting the calories available from beverages in the marketplace. In fact, the total amount of beverage calories available in the marketplace decreased by 21 percent from 1998 to 2008.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie and Kevin Rector, Baltimore Sun Media Group | December 11, 2012
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman moved Tuesday to ban the sale of high-sugar drinks such as soda in parks, libraries and other county properties and at county-sponsored events - hoping yet again to make the county a progressive model. "I believe Howard County government should lead by example," Ulman said. "That's why today I've signed an executive order to increase the availability of healthy beverage options in our county departments and programs. "The vending machines will look different, starting right away," Ulman said at an event in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
An increase to Baltimore's bottle tax - the linchpin of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to raise funds to renovate the city's decrepit school buildings - received preliminary approval from the City Council Monday, likely assuring the measure will become law. The legislation would raise the tax on bottled beverages from 2 cents to 5 cents in July 2013. Supporters hailed the tax increase as a key step toward the biggest overhaul of city schools in decades. "We'll never catch up with generations of neglect of our schools buildings until we jump-start with a plan like the one before us today," said Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke as she cast her vote for the measure.
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