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NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | December 6, 2006
Pity the poor saucier. Though the position of the maker-of-sauces has been, since Escoffier, near the top of the kitchen hierarchy, the sauces themselves often go unsung. Taken for granted, sauces often are relegated to the decorative side of a dish or tucked under marquee ingredients. But from such outposts, what beauty can be discovered and what flavors can be discerned. Take the classic beurre blanc: a velvety, delicate butter sauce that originated in Nantes, France, on the Loire River, and traditionally was paired with poached fish.
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NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | December 6, 2006
Pity the poor saucier. Though the position of the maker-of-sauces has been, since Escoffier, near the top of the kitchen hierarchy, the sauces themselves often go unsung. Taken for granted, sauces often are relegated to the decorative side of a dish or tucked under marquee ingredients. But from such outposts, what beauty can be discovered and what flavors can be discerned. Take the classic beurre blanc: a velvety, delicate butter sauce that originated in Nantes, France, on the Loire River, and traditionally was paired with poached fish.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 15, 2004
By August, temperatures are soaring in inland Massachusetts, where we live, so we find refuge on Cape Cod with good friends who have a small cottage near the water. Our hosts love to cook and eat as much as we do, so we always go to a nearby fish store together to purchase each night's supper. Since scallops are my favorite shellfish, I am taking with me this year a new recipe that features these tender morsels. The dish -- Pan Seared Scallops and Tomatoes with Basil Beurre Blanc -- takes only a few minutes to assemble and makes a striking visual impression.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
John Walsh, executive chef at Chef's Expressions, says he and owner Jerry Edwards came up with this recipe after tasting a sauvignon blanc with hints of green apple and clove. "We thought the scallops would go great with it," Walsh says. "The beurre blanc just brings it all together." SCALLOPS IN CLOVE BEURRE BLANC MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS 20 to 24 giant scallops with attachment muscle removed (about 1 1 / 4 pounds) flour for dredging sea salt and white pepper 1 pint heavy cream 12 whole cloves 3 sliced shallots 1 / 2 pound butter (divided use)
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
John Walsh, executive chef at Chef's Expressions, says he and owner Jerry Edwards came up with this recipe after tasting a sauvignon blanc with hints of green apple and clove. "We thought the scallops would go great with it," Walsh says. "The beurre blanc just brings it all together." SCALLOPS IN CLOVE BEURRE BLANC MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS 20 to 24 giant scallops with attachment muscle removed (about 1 1 / 4 pounds) flour for dredging sea salt and white pepper 1 pint heavy cream 12 whole cloves 3 sliced shallots 1 / 2 pound butter (divided use)
NEWS
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,Special to the Sun | February 18, 2004
OCEAN CITY -- A professional Ocean City chef and a down-home cook from Smith Island shared top honors in the seventh annual Maryland Rockfish Cooking Contest, with each winning $500 for dishes that showcased rockfish in creative and delicious ways. This year for the first time, the Maryland Department of Agriculture's Seafood Marketing Program elected to recognize both a professional and a nonprofessional winner. The professional winner was Douglas Spencer, the sous-chef for Center Plate catering at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center in Ocean City, who won for his Cashew and Coconut Crusted Rockfish With Apple Cider Beurre Blanc and Oyster Fennel Dressing.
NEWS
By Capt.Bob Spore | December 9, 1990
It may come as a surprise, but big-money Bass Anglers Sportsman Society tournaments still are segregated -- not by race, but by sex.The BASS pro tournament circuit is for male bass fishermen only.Early last spring, after much pressure from such renowned professional female bass fishermen as Linda England, BASS agreed to go coed. Two months later, officials reversed their position. The company cited pressure from men and their wives as the reason for changing its mind.It looks like pro bass fishing could use a good Equal Employment Opportunity officer.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 15, 2002
Even a serious fire can have a silver lining. In the case of the Manor Tavern, it gave owner Mark Greene a chance to renovate more than the physical space. The fire happened in August; the Monkton restaurant opened for business again two months later with a new chef, Henry Doyle, and an updated menu. It's still not the hippest place around, but so what? Now that the weather has turned cold, the Manor Tavern has the only thing that matters: a roaring fire in the fireplace. I do think more could have been done with the newly renovated formal dining room -- it's basically brown, with no art on the walls, at least not as of our visit, and a dropped ceiling.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 7, 1996
Think of Brighton's as Baltimore's most expensive coffee shop. Or better still, think of it as Baltimore's most beautiful coffee shop.It's like a morning room, with large windows facing east and walls painted a soft, sunny yellow. Flowers and foliage are everywhere -- in large arrangements, in little pots on each table, in the floral design of drapery fabric and in botanical prints. The tables are well spaced; the chairs very comfortable.In any other hotel this would be a formal dining room, but not next to Hampton's, the Harbor Court Hotel's main restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 23, 1999
Another lossNow that Haussner's is closing, everyone wants to eat there one last time. "We tried to go to Haussner's for lunch," one person told me, "but the line was part way down Eastern Avenue. In the rain!"But Haussner's isn't the only Baltimore institution we may be losing. Alfred Braznell, owner of Braznell's Caribbean Kitchen, says his restaurant is for sale. Located at 1623 E. Baltimore St., it was one of the first, if not the first, sit-down Caribbean restaurants in the city. Who knows?
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 15, 2004
By August, temperatures are soaring in inland Massachusetts, where we live, so we find refuge on Cape Cod with good friends who have a small cottage near the water. Our hosts love to cook and eat as much as we do, so we always go to a nearby fish store together to purchase each night's supper. Since scallops are my favorite shellfish, I am taking with me this year a new recipe that features these tender morsels. The dish -- Pan Seared Scallops and Tomatoes with Basil Beurre Blanc -- takes only a few minutes to assemble and makes a striking visual impression.
NEWS
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,Special to the Sun | February 18, 2004
OCEAN CITY -- A professional Ocean City chef and a down-home cook from Smith Island shared top honors in the seventh annual Maryland Rockfish Cooking Contest, with each winning $500 for dishes that showcased rockfish in creative and delicious ways. This year for the first time, the Maryland Department of Agriculture's Seafood Marketing Program elected to recognize both a professional and a nonprofessional winner. The professional winner was Douglas Spencer, the sous-chef for Center Plate catering at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center in Ocean City, who won for his Cashew and Coconut Crusted Rockfish With Apple Cider Beurre Blanc and Oyster Fennel Dressing.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 15, 2002
Even a serious fire can have a silver lining. In the case of the Manor Tavern, it gave owner Mark Greene a chance to renovate more than the physical space. The fire happened in August; the Monkton restaurant opened for business again two months later with a new chef, Henry Doyle, and an updated menu. It's still not the hippest place around, but so what? Now that the weather has turned cold, the Manor Tavern has the only thing that matters: a roaring fire in the fireplace. I do think more could have been done with the newly renovated formal dining room -- it's basically brown, with no art on the walls, at least not as of our visit, and a dropped ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
For months, the red-brick restaurant building stood forlornly vacant on the corner of Boston and Montford streets. Then, a few weeks ago, it flushed purple. "The paint is called Midnight Mansion. It's supposed to be a gray-blue," says Michael Strati. But, as he discovered, you paint gray-blue on top of red brick, and it becomes ... purple. So how come Strati named his new restaurant Red Fish? "I liked the name," he says. And, somehow the name Purple Fish doesn't have quite the right ring to it. Whether it was the name or the color, business boomed as soon as the eatery opened its doors July 14. "We got busy right off the bat," says Strati.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 15, 2001
Gertrude's is something of a forgotten restaurant. Not at lunchtime, of course. Museumgoers and staff at nearby Johns Hopkins University keep it busy. And it's a great place to go for afternoon tea. But after three years, the hoopla surrounding cookbook author John Shields' first restaurant has died down. It now has much the same problem as its predecessor, Donna's at the BMA: How do you lure customers on a weeknight without much in the way of a sign and almost no foot traffic? Particularly when your restaurant is not inexpensive.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,sun restaurant critic | October 3, 1999
I usually wait a month or so before I pay a new restaurant an official visit. I like to give it time to settle down. But after a month the new Gemini Bistro isn't doing much settling down. It's already on its second chef and has a different menu from when I stopped by for a bite soon after it opened.When four of us ate at Gemini recently, I found that Brigitte Bledsoe, who had been in the kitchen when it opened in August, had been replaced by Allison Dugdale, known locally for her work as the chef at John Steven Ltd. and before that Foster's Oyster Bar, both in Fells Point.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 16, 1997
The evolution of Weber's on Boston has been gradual. When Denis Manneville, former food and beverage director of the Hyatt, took over the turn-of-the-century tavern three years ago, you had a feeling he wasn't going to be satisfied serving a pub menu of wings and burgers forever.Sure enough, he started adding dishes like salmon en papillote and grilled pork loin with gingersnap gravy. Over the last couple of years he introduced a Southern-style Sunday brunch and a tapas menu.But with the hiring of chef David Rudie, formerly of the Milton Inn and then Troia at the Walters, he's made major changes.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 3, 1999
Bulle Rock, the public golf course that opened in Harford County last spring, quickly became famous for having extremely high greens fees - $126 a round, to be exact.Bulle Rock (named after a famed thoroughbred) got more press when it was recently voted Golf Digest's best new upscale public golf course for 1998.What you don't hear about is Bulle Rock's restaurant, which looks like a public golf course's dining room - nothing fancy, in other words - but has a chef who formerly worked at the Milton Inn and Hamilton's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 23, 1999
Another lossNow that Haussner's is closing, everyone wants to eat there one last time. "We tried to go to Haussner's for lunch," one person told me, "but the line was part way down Eastern Avenue. In the rain!"But Haussner's isn't the only Baltimore institution we may be losing. Alfred Braznell, owner of Braznell's Caribbean Kitchen, says his restaurant is for sale. Located at 1623 E. Baltimore St., it was one of the first, if not the first, sit-down Caribbean restaurants in the city. Who knows?
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 3, 1999
Bulle Rock, the public golf course that opened in Harford County last spring, quickly became famous for having extremely high greens fees - $126 a round, to be exact.Bulle Rock (named after a famed thoroughbred) got more press when it was recently voted Golf Digest's best new upscale public golf course for 1998.What you don't hear about is Bulle Rock's restaurant, which looks like a public golf course's dining room - nothing fancy, in other words - but has a chef who formerly worked at the Milton Inn and Hamilton's.
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