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Betty Shabazz

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NEWS
June 25, 1997
LIKE THE OTHER members of the troika of widows of slain civil rights leaders -- Coretta Scott King and Myrlie Evers-Williams -- Betty Shabazz used her husband's death as a catalyst for personal change that positively affected many lives.The 1965 assassination of Malcolm X, who as an Islamic minister had taken a vow of poverty, left Mrs. Shabazz with no source of income to provide for her four young daughters and the twins she was pregnant with.Lesser individuals might have scurried to some obscure locale where they could live out their lives in anonymity and raise their children away from the worldly threats inherent in being the offspring of a famous person.
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FEATURES
June 1, 2000
Today in history: June 1 In 1801, Mormon leader Brigham Young was born in Whitingham, Vt. In 1813, the commander of the U.S. frigate Chesapeake, Capt. James Lawrence, said, "Don't give up the ship" during a losing battle with a British frigate. In 1926, actress Marilyn Monroe was born in Los Angeles. In 1943, a civilian flight from Lisbon to London was shot down by the Germans during World War II, killing all aboard, including actor Leslie Howard. In 1958, Charles de Gaulle became premier of France.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1997
NEW YORK -- Betty Shabazz, widow of the slain African-American leader Malcolm X, was laid to rest yesterday afternoon with the same Sunni Muslim funeral service that marked his passing 32 years ago.Late yesterday afternoon, her casket was placed atop her husband's in a family grave at Ferncliff Cemetery in Ardsley, a suburb 20 miles north of New York.The outpouring of emotion for Dr. Shabazz seemed to surprise even her family and friends.For a week, the mourning united this fractious city, with the most extreme of Harlem's black nationalist leaders joining the city's Republican mayor in praising her as a civil rights voice and mother of six.Old friends of the family couldn't help but contrast the warm feelings for Dr. Shabazz with the mixed reaction after Malcolm X was gunned down in the Audubon Ballroom in February 1965.
FEATURES
By Cassandra Spratling and Cassandra Spratling,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 6, 1998
"Betty Shabazz," edited by Jamie Foster Brown. Simon & Schuster. 160 pages. $23.Before her death in a tragic fire, Betty Shabazz was besknown as the widow of Malcolm X and the woman who went on earn a Ph.D. and become a college administrator while raising their six daughters and traveling around the world keeping Malcolm's name and mission alive.In "Betty Shabazz," a marvelous collection of 40 essays, readers can learn more about this inspiring woman, mentor and friend to everyone from Maya Angelou and Queen Latifah to former NAACP chair Myrlie Evers-Williams and Gloria Steinem.
NEWS
By James Bock and M. Dion Thompson and James Bock and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | June 8, 1997
Betty Shabazz was 28 years old and pregnant the Sunday afternoon in 1965 when a fusillade of bullets felled Malcolm X in Harlem's Audubon Ballroom. Seated on a bench near where her husband was speaking, Shabazz swept her four young daughters to the floor and covered them with her body as the gunfire crackled.In the years after the assassination of El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, as Malcolm then called himself, her instinct remained the same: to protect her family.Brick by brick, she built a fire wall of privacy and security around the four girls who witnessed their father's slaughter and the twin daughters born later that year.
FEATURES
By Cassandra Spratling and Cassandra Spratling,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 6, 1998
"Betty Shabazz," edited by Jamie Foster Brown. Simon & Schuster. 160 pages. $23.Before her death in a tragic fire, Betty Shabazz was besknown as the widow of Malcolm X and the woman who went on earn a Ph.D. and become a college administrator while raising their six daughters and traveling around the world keeping Malcolm's name and mission alive.In "Betty Shabazz," a marvelous collection of 40 essays, readers can learn more about this inspiring woman, mentor and friend to everyone from Maya Angelou and Queen Latifah to former NAACP chair Myrlie Evers-Williams and Gloria Steinem.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | June 29, 1997
BETTY SHABAZZ, the woman who saw her husband blasted into eternity and then inspired millions by carrying on with dignity and courage, was buried last week. All the accolades she received somehow don't seem adequate .Former New York City Mayor David Dinkins called Shabazz "an example of a person who met her adversity and transcended it." Dinkins' political rival, current New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, spoke at Shabazz's funeral."All 7 million New Yorkers share with you this sense of loss," wire stories reported Giuliani saying.
NEWS
June 7, 1997
THE FAMOUS PAID their condolences in New York this week, at a hospital bedside in the Bronx and a funeral in Manhattan. Coretta Scott King, Maya Angelou and Jesse Jackson traveled to see Betty Shabazz, the widow of Malcolm X. She had been severely burned in a fire allegedly set by her disturbed grandson. Across town, Ted Turner, Jane Fonda and other friends of Time Warner chairman Gerald M. Levin attended services for his son, Jonathan, who was found bound, shot and stabbed in his apartment.
FEATURES
June 1, 2000
Today in history: June 1 In 1801, Mormon leader Brigham Young was born in Whitingham, Vt. In 1813, the commander of the U.S. frigate Chesapeake, Capt. James Lawrence, said, "Don't give up the ship" during a losing battle with a British frigate. In 1926, actress Marilyn Monroe was born in Los Angeles. In 1943, a civilian flight from Lisbon to London was shot down by the Germans during World War II, killing all aboard, including actor Leslie Howard. In 1958, Charles de Gaulle became premier of France.
NEWS
May 11, 1995
Prosecutors' last-minute decision to drop charges against Quibilah Shabazz, Malcolm X's daughter, for allegedly plotting to kill Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan lets the government off the hook in a case that was beginning to look like a no-win proposition regardless of the outcome.Ms. Shabazz was indicted in January by a Minneapolis grand jury after a federal informant claimed she tried to hire him to kill Mr. Farrakhan. Prosecutors alleged Ms. Shabazz wanted Mr. Farrakhan killed because she believed he was involved in her father's assassination 30 years ago and because she feared Mr. Farrakhan might try to harm her mother, Betty Shabazz.
NEWS
By Story by M. Dion Thompson and Mary Corey and Story by M. Dion Thompson and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
Yolanda King sits in her stocking feet, sipping peppermint tea and passing on the gospel truth. "This old lady used to say, 'It's hard enough being who you is, let alone who you ain't.' "She smiles and her warm laughter fills the hotel room. The old lesson guides her life these days. Growing up in Atlanta, people were always watching Yolanda King, reminding her that being herself was not enough.She had a legacy to live up to and a hero's torch to carry. It was the same with the other men and women who lost their fathers during the civil rights era.The world expected more of a King, an Evers, a Shabazz.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | June 29, 1997
BETTY SHABAZZ, the woman who saw her husband blasted into eternity and then inspired millions by carrying on with dignity and courage, was buried last week. All the accolades she received somehow don't seem adequate .Former New York City Mayor David Dinkins called Shabazz "an example of a person who met her adversity and transcended it." Dinkins' political rival, current New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, spoke at Shabazz's funeral."All 7 million New Yorkers share with you this sense of loss," wire stories reported Giuliani saying.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1997
NEW YORK -- Betty Shabazz, widow of the slain African-American leader Malcolm X, was laid to rest yesterday afternoon with the same Sunni Muslim funeral service that marked his passing 32 years ago.Late yesterday afternoon, her casket was placed atop her husband's in a family grave at Ferncliff Cemetery in Ardsley, a suburb 20 miles north of New York.The outpouring of emotion for Dr. Shabazz seemed to surprise even her family and friends.For a week, the mourning united this fractious city, with the most extreme of Harlem's black nationalist leaders joining the city's Republican mayor in praising her as a civil rights voice and mother of six.Old friends of the family couldn't help but contrast the warm feelings for Dr. Shabazz with the mixed reaction after Malcolm X was gunned down in the Audubon Ballroom in February 1965.
NEWS
June 25, 1997
LIKE THE OTHER members of the troika of widows of slain civil rights leaders -- Coretta Scott King and Myrlie Evers-Williams -- Betty Shabazz used her husband's death as a catalyst for personal change that positively affected many lives.The 1965 assassination of Malcolm X, who as an Islamic minister had taken a vow of poverty, left Mrs. Shabazz with no source of income to provide for her four young daughters and the twins she was pregnant with.Lesser individuals might have scurried to some obscure locale where they could live out their lives in anonymity and raise their children away from the worldly threats inherent in being the offspring of a famous person.
NEWS
By James Bock and M. Dion Thompson and James Bock and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | June 8, 1997
Betty Shabazz was 28 years old and pregnant the Sunday afternoon in 1965 when a fusillade of bullets felled Malcolm X in Harlem's Audubon Ballroom. Seated on a bench near where her husband was speaking, Shabazz swept her four young daughters to the floor and covered them with her body as the gunfire crackled.In the years after the assassination of El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, as Malcolm then called himself, her instinct remained the same: to protect her family.Brick by brick, she built a fire wall of privacy and security around the four girls who witnessed their father's slaughter and the twin daughters born later that year.
NEWS
June 7, 1997
THE FAMOUS PAID their condolences in New York this week, at a hospital bedside in the Bronx and a funeral in Manhattan. Coretta Scott King, Maya Angelou and Jesse Jackson traveled to see Betty Shabazz, the widow of Malcolm X. She had been severely burned in a fire allegedly set by her disturbed grandson. Across town, Ted Turner, Jane Fonda and other friends of Time Warner chairman Gerald M. Levin attended services for his son, Jonathan, who was found bound, shot and stabbed in his apartment.
NEWS
By Story by M. Dion Thompson and Mary Corey and Story by M. Dion Thompson and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
Yolanda King sits in her stocking feet, sipping peppermint tea and passing on the gospel truth. "This old lady used to say, 'It's hard enough being who you is, let alone who you ain't.' "She smiles and her warm laughter fills the hotel room. The old lesson guides her life these days. Growing up in Atlanta, people were always watching Yolanda King, reminding her that being herself was not enough.She had a legacy to live up to and a hero's torch to carry. It was the same with the other men and women who lost their fathers during the civil rights era.The world expected more of a King, an Evers, a Shabazz.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- Betty Shabazz, the widow of Malcolm X, urged students last night to commit themselves to changing the world.Blacks, she said, must be prepared to deal with racism both on campus and in the world. The problems of poverty and drugs are too great to ignore, she said."For some people, the hour has come and they know that," she said. "You have to make a decision. What kind of person are you?"Addressing about 1,000 people at the University of Maryland's Stamp Student Union here, Dr. Shabazz said, "No one can oppress you or discriminate against you if you don't allow it."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 7, 1997
THE LIFE of Malcolm Shabazz the second may ultimately teach us what we haven't learned from the autobiography of his famous grandfather, Malcolm Shabazz the first, better known to the world as Malcolm X.As those who keep up with the news now know, young Malcolm was charged with juvenile delinquency in connection with a fire last weekend that resulted in his grandmother, Betty Shabazz, being severely burned over 80 percent of her body. Subsequent news reports said the boy was angry about being sent to live with his grandmother; that he had frequent clashes with his mother, Qubilah; and that he had led a troubled, nomadic life.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Declaring the NAACP to be "the conscience of America," Myrlie Evers-Williams, a twice-widowed civil rights activist, took charge of the venerable organization yesterday at a formal, quasi-religious inaugural ceremony here at the historic Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church.In an atmosphere enlivened by a gospel chorus and poetic sermons, she was sworn in by seven black federal judges, one of whom, Judge A. Leon Higginbotham Jr., said they probably wouldn't be judges were it not for the work of the NAACP.
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