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NEWS
February 16, 2013
Fifty years ago this month there was a knock on our apartment door. With a baby on my hip, I greeted my downstairs neighbor: "You've got to read this!" she said, pushing a book toward me. "It will change your life!" That was my introduction to The Feminine Mystique. It was a pleasant change from Dr. Spock. Although I was part of Betty Friedan's target audience - - a white, middle class, college-educated woman relegated to changing diapers and keeping house while her husband enjoyed a fulfilling career - The Feminine Mystique did not speak to me. It was a powerful, revolutionary book that should have made me mad as hell, but this then 25-year-old, happily married wife and mother felt blessed every day to be able to stay at home, care for her baby and keep house for an appreciative husband.
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NEWS
February 16, 2013
Fifty years ago this month there was a knock on our apartment door. With a baby on my hip, I greeted my downstairs neighbor: "You've got to read this!" she said, pushing a book toward me. "It will change your life!" That was my introduction to The Feminine Mystique. It was a pleasant change from Dr. Spock. Although I was part of Betty Friedan's target audience - - a white, middle class, college-educated woman relegated to changing diapers and keeping house while her husband enjoyed a fulfilling career - The Feminine Mystique did not speak to me. It was a powerful, revolutionary book that should have made me mad as hell, but this then 25-year-old, happily married wife and mother felt blessed every day to be able to stay at home, care for her baby and keep house for an appreciative husband.
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NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
"Beyond Gender," by Betty Friedan. Edited with Brigid O'Farrell. The Woodrow Wilson Press. $22.95.When Betty Friedan's "inner Geiger counter" began ticking loudly in the early 1960s, she wrote "The Feminine Mystique" and touched a spark to the repressed ambition and anger of millions of dissatisfied women. The movement those women created proceeded to challenge the status quo of gender roles and responsibilities and turn conventional wisdom upside down.Friedan's Geiger counter is ticking again.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 13, 2006
BOSTON -- This is what I remembered when the news of Betty Friedan's death on her 85th birthday came over the Internet. I remembered Aug. 26, 1970, the Women's Strike for Equality. I remembered Betty Friedan parading down New York's Fifth Avenue, in the front row, with tens of thousands of exhilarated women behind her. I also remembered the afternoon edition of my newspaper illustrating that march with two front-page photos. On the left was the pretty, blond smiling figurehead of some unknown group of Happy Homemakers.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | August 27, 1992
It's probably just a coincidence that in 1963 these two major events occurred: One, Betty Friedan's revolutionary book "The Feminine Mystique" appeared; and, two, the popular television show about the ideal family of the 1950s, "Leave It to Beaver," disappeared.Nonetheless, coincidence or not, it is tempting to look back and see symbolized in these two events an important turning point in the evolution of a woman's place in society.Of course, of the two it was Friedan's book that altered the social landscape, changing the way we live and the whole trajectory of relationships, families, politics and the workplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Weiner and Lauren Weiner,Special to the Sun | May 21, 2000
One of the people who established the image of the 1950s as a stultifying time in America was Betty Friedan. Friedan, 79, was a high-achieving graduate student in psychology during World War II. Had she taken the scholarly path that lay open to her, rather than settling for life as a New York journalist and suburban mother, she might never have written "The Feminine Mystique" (W.W. Norton, 452 pages, $27.50, 1963). She ran circles around the scholars, using a plain writing style, some pretty arbitrary research methods and most of all her burning dissatisfactions, to produce a book that was more than a book.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 7, 2006
Those of us who came of age with the feminist movement wanted to be a Gloria Steinem kind of feminist. Not a Betty Friedan kind of feminist. We were not the restless suburban housewives for whom the frumpy, doughy Friedan spoke. We were not the woman who suffered "a nameless, aching dissatisfaction" with her life of chores and children. Instead, we were young careerists like the sleek and husky-voiced Steinem, who had the physical qualifications to make her journalistic mark in a bunny costume.
NEWS
By ELAINE WOO and ELAINE WOO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 5, 2006
Betty Friedan, the visionary, combative feminist who launched a social revolution with her provocative 1963 book, The Feminine Mystique, died yesterday, her 85th birthday. She died of congestive heart failure at her home in Washington, said Emily Bazelon, a cousin speaking for the family. She said Ms. Friedan had been in failing health for some time. Her best-selling book identified "the problem that has no name," the unhappiness of post-World War II American women unfulfilled by traditional notions of female domesticity.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 13, 2006
BOSTON -- This is what I remembered when the news of Betty Friedan's death on her 85th birthday came over the Internet. I remembered Aug. 26, 1970, the Women's Strike for Equality. I remembered Betty Friedan parading down New York's Fifth Avenue, in the front row, with tens of thousands of exhilarated women behind her. I also remembered the afternoon edition of my newspaper illustrating that march with two front-page photos. On the left was the pretty, blond smiling figurehead of some unknown group of Happy Homemakers.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
In retrospect, Betty Friedan's contribution to women's liberation in the latter half of the 20th century was less a summons to action than an intervention. The daughters and granddaughters of those spirited women who decades earlier had won the right to vote and birth control services, as well as access to higher education and a far wider choice of professions, had by the 1950s chucked their legacy for a post-World War II ideal of femininity that dictated that a husband, children and suburban home were all a woman needed to be happy.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 7, 2006
Those of us who came of age with the feminist movement wanted to be a Gloria Steinem kind of feminist. Not a Betty Friedan kind of feminist. We were not the restless suburban housewives for whom the frumpy, doughy Friedan spoke. We were not the woman who suffered "a nameless, aching dissatisfaction" with her life of chores and children. Instead, we were young careerists like the sleek and husky-voiced Steinem, who had the physical qualifications to make her journalistic mark in a bunny costume.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
In retrospect, Betty Friedan's contribution to women's liberation in the latter half of the 20th century was less a summons to action than an intervention. The daughters and granddaughters of those spirited women who decades earlier had won the right to vote and birth control services, as well as access to higher education and a far wider choice of professions, had by the 1950s chucked their legacy for a post-World War II ideal of femininity that dictated that a husband, children and suburban home were all a woman needed to be happy.
NEWS
February 5, 2006
MARYLAND Water supplies under threat Maryland's growing population is straining water-supply networks, experts say, and making them increasingly vulnerable to drought. Unless steps are taken to find new sources, conserve the supply and manage growth, they warn, shortages and restrictions could become chronic. pg 1a Proposal targets group homes State officials and legislators are moving to tighten oversight of privately run group homes caring for 2,700 troubled foster children in Maryland.
NEWS
By ELAINE WOO and ELAINE WOO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 5, 2006
Betty Friedan, the visionary, combative feminist who launched a social revolution with her provocative 1963 book, The Feminine Mystique, died yesterday, her 85th birthday. She died of congestive heart failure at her home in Washington, said Emily Bazelon, a cousin speaking for the family. She said Ms. Friedan had been in failing health for some time. Her best-selling book identified "the problem that has no name," the unhappiness of post-World War II American women unfulfilled by traditional notions of female domesticity.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 15, 2004
IN 1972, Ira Levin, riding the crest of the wave generated by Rosemary's Baby, wrote a book about an idyllic Connecticut community named Stepford where insecure men retooled their restless wives into robotic beauties who did nothing but cook, clean and praise them in bed. The Stepford Wives, a movie released in 1975 and based on the book, drew the ire of feminists everywhere - Betty Friedan stormed out of a screening near tears - who criticized it,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 30, 2001
Richard A. Posner has a lot to say, and a great deal of experience to draw on. He is widely taken to be the most broadly learned judge sitting on a court in the United States -- the sort of hyperbolic generality I would automatically ridicule if it were not that I know of no other contender for the title. He sits on the Seventh Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, a single step below the U.S. Supreme Court; he is a senior lecturer at the law school of the University of Chicago. In November 1999 he was appointed to mediate the Microsoft antitrust case.
NEWS
February 5, 2006
MARYLAND Water supplies under threat Maryland's growing population is straining water-supply networks, experts say, and making them increasingly vulnerable to drought. Unless steps are taken to find new sources, conserve the supply and manage growth, they warn, shortages and restrictions could become chronic. pg 1a Proposal targets group homes State officials and legislators are moving to tighten oversight of privately run group homes caring for 2,700 troubled foster children in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
When Betty Friedan turned 60, her friends threw her a surprise party. She was horrified; their gesture, she thought, was an announcement that she was old, used up, useless.That's in the first paragraph of the first chapter of "The Fountain of Age," and right there is where Ms. Friedan lost me. After all, an unlined face and girlish figure have never been her stock in trade. In fact, in her first book, "The Feminine Mystique," this mother of the women's movement helped us understand, about 30 years ago, that women were more than the sum of their pretty parts and roles as sex object, wife and mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Weiner and Lauren Weiner,Special to the Sun | May 21, 2000
One of the people who established the image of the 1950s as a stultifying time in America was Betty Friedan. Friedan, 79, was a high-achieving graduate student in psychology during World War II. Had she taken the scholarly path that lay open to her, rather than settling for life as a New York journalist and suburban mother, she might never have written "The Feminine Mystique" (W.W. Norton, 452 pages, $27.50, 1963). She ran circles around the scholars, using a plain writing style, some pretty arbitrary research methods and most of all her burning dissatisfactions, to produce a book that was more than a book.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
"Beyond Gender," by Betty Friedan. Edited with Brigid O'Farrell. The Woodrow Wilson Press. $22.95.When Betty Friedan's "inner Geiger counter" began ticking loudly in the early 1960s, she wrote "The Feminine Mystique" and touched a spark to the repressed ambition and anger of millions of dissatisfied women. The movement those women created proceeded to challenge the status quo of gender roles and responsibilities and turn conventional wisdom upside down.Friedan's Geiger counter is ticking again.
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