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SPORTS
By Kent Baker | April 1, 1994
Racing fans consulting their Pimlico programs yesterday were left scratching their heads after being confronted with the first glitch of the spring meeting.Omitted from the past-performance charts were the distances of the entries' previous races, leaving bettors with more figuring to do than normal."That was a bad mistake," said Jim Mango, Pimlico-Laurel vice president of pari-mutuels and development.Jeff Johnston of the program department, which is based at Laurel, said the problem is a "single-day error" that will be rectified today.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
The owners of California Chrome might have had to face the world after the colt fell short of a Triple Crown victory Saturday, but Tim McCoig faced an even tougher crowd after the loss: his wife. "It's not a good day in my household. I just lost a week's paycheck," the Owings Mills resident said just moments after the Belmont Stakes favorite, who could have become the first Triple Crown winner in 36 years, finished tied for fourth. McCoig was among the group of people who gathered at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday in hopes of watching California Chrome continue his gallop into history.
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 21, 1999
Phi Beta Doc, a 3-year-old gelding who ran fifth as the favorite June 5 at Pimlico Race Course, sneaked by the bettors in the $76,500 Nick Shuk Memorial Stakes yesterday at Delaware Park and won at odds of 43-1.Trained by Robert W. Leonard at Fair Hill, Phi Beta Doc paid $89.20 to win after catching the front-running Mythical Gem in the final strides. Ridden by Mario Verge and trained by H. Graham Motion, Mythical Gem was the 4-5 favorite.The time for 1 1/16 miles on soft turf was 1 minute, 44 seconds.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
With a new long-term racing deal in place, increased breeding activity in the state and planned improvements to Maryland's two thoroughbred tracks, horse racing seems to be barreling toward a brighter future in a state where it had once been so important. Bettors have been slower to catch on, though. Total handle at Pimlico Race Course for the 36-day meet increased 12 percent to $188 million, the track announced Tuesday. But the per-day handle dropped 12 percent,  from $5.2 million to $4.6 million, thanks in part to seven racing days added so that the meet would span the entire length of the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
The patron, brandishing a cigarette in one hand and a beer in the other, walked across the grandstand apron at Laurel Park and asked facetiously: "Do you mind if I smoke here?"Everyone stared blankly at the customer, whose remark was typical of the grousing that has occurred since the track instituted the new workplace smoking rules mandated by state law this week."I think it's a shame that they sell you cigarettes for $3 a pack and then won't let you smoke them where you want," said a regular bettor who wished to be known only as Pete.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2007
With Maryland's simulcasting signal challenged by those of nearly a dozen other tracks around the country, Maryland Jockey Club president and chief operating officer Lou Raffetto wants to improve the odds of getting bettors interested in playing the state's horses when Laurel Park opens Aug. 10 for 10 days of racing. Billed as "Ten Days at 10 Percent - Racing's Best Bet," Laurel ownership's takeout on Maryland's live races will be cut by about half, with the money going directly into the bettors' pockets.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1995
For horseplayers, days like today are golden.Sure, the crowds can be unruly and the lines a bit long at the betting windows, but the quality of races and quantity of bettors provide an irresistible opportunity for handicappers, according to James Quinn, a noted handicapper and author of 10 books on horse betting.In fact, his most recent book, due out in July by publisher William Morrow & Co., is called "A Handicapper's Stakes Festival" and makes the case that big-race days have evolved into a unique opportunity for savvy gamblers.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
Ten bettors correctly picked all six winners in the first Nationa Pic-6 pool yesterday and will split $392,837.60 in winnings, according to Chris Scherf, executive director of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which organized the pool.Four of the 10 winning tickets were purchased at Pimlico or at one of the seven tracks that commingles with the Baltimore outlet. There were four winning tickets at Thistledown Race Course in Cleveland, and one each at Arlington Park in Illinois and Calder Race Course in Florida.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
A wagering foul-up at Laurel Park last week that infuriated bettors was, according to racing officials, an inadvertent human error.A horse presumably scratched from Friday's 10th race was reinstated with no announcement. Many bettors did not realize the No. 13 horse, Honey's Acallade, was running. Although she was 7-2 in the morning line, she paid a glaring $45.80 after winning by a neck.James Mango, Maryland Jockey Club chief administrative officer, and Kenneth A. Schertle, executive director of the Maryland Racing Commission, said this week that their investigations uncovered no fraud.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Bettors considered it a great leap forward, and the horse racing industry considered it the next source for growth. But now, the promising world of telephone and Internet wagering has become racing's latest battleground. At the center of combat is Magna Entertainment Corp., majority owner of Pimlico and Laurel Park. Based in Canada, Magna owns 12 other tracks and a 24-hour television network devoted to racing and a betting service for account wagering. It's called account wagering because bettors establish an account with a company and then bet on races by drawing down the account via the telephone and Internet.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 18, 2013
A pair of racing aficionados from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., spent Saturday watching the early races at Pimlico, then they put their observations to use to score a massive payday in the Preakness. Joe Cavallo, 26, and Stephanie Rafferty, 21, hit the Pick 4 with Preakness winner Oxbow, Itsmyluckyday, Mylute, and Orb. One of their 72 50-cent Pick 4 bets netted $4,883.05, and Rafferty fought back tears as she saw the payout. “What am I going to do with $5,000?” Rafferty said. “It hasn't set in yet.” While the couple spends countless summer days at the track in Saratoga, Rafferty, who works in construction, said she only gambles on the big race days.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Many were off work because of a snowstorm that never came, so they went to Hollywood Casino, tucked off Interstate 95, in search of games they thought they'd never see here: blackjack, roulette, craps and poker. For the first time Wednesday and about four months after voters approved it, Marylanders played table games without leaving the state. About 35 people were waiting when Hollywood sent out a small team of dealers to begin table play about 2 p.m., immediately after the Penn National-owned casino in Cecil County received permission from the state.
SPORTS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Jeremy Gardner is getting lucky with first-time horse gambles, and he isn't planning to stop anytime soon.  Gardner, who recently moved to Baltimore with his fiancée Tracey Richter fromLlos Angeles, turned $100 in bets into $700 in wins by 2 p.m. "I'm going to bet until it's gone," he said giddily. "I'm only betting on the long shots. " "I'm having so much fun," he added as he waited to make more bets at the infield windows.  A steady stream of bettors put down cash at the open windows, next to a tent sponsored by The Daily Racing Form and horseplayernow.com.
SPORTS
By David Selig, Jeff Barker and Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
They might not have rivaled the revelry in the winner's circle after Saturday's Preakness, but the lines in front of the tellers' windows at Pimlico Race Course were abuzz with fans shouting in excitement about their winning tickets. Rick Digrigoli , of Hoover, Ala., left the window folding bills into his wallet, the result of an exacta bet on top two finishers I'll Have Another and Bodemeister. Digrigoli has been coming to the Preakness with friends for 17 years, but his win of about $46 on a $5 bet wasn't the result of experience.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Handicapping a horse race like Saturday's Preakness is an iffy proposition for amateurs like me. Over the years, horse players of my acquaintance have picked favorites based on the names of the colts; any horse with a name resembling that of a relative was an automatic choice. The color of the jockey's silks also figured in the equation; ladies do love pink. Then there were picks based on the size of the horse's rump, with bigger being better. Sham's magnificent hindquarters caught my eye back in 1973.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, Tribune newspapers | May 1, 2011
Some years, a majestic 3-year-old thoroughbred will trot onto the scene and immediately emerge as a favorite in the weeks leading up to the Kentucky Derby. He'll look great in workouts, dominate the prep races and tantalize the sport, injecting hope into the elusive dream of seeing a horse win a Triple Crown. This is not one of those years. In fact, if you have $2 and a hunch, you might have just as good a shot as the experts at picking a winner in the 137th running of the Kentucky Derby, even if you barely know the difference between a furlong, a furlough and a fur coat.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2005
Last Saturday, a week before the running of the 130th Preakness Stakes, Pimlico Race Course was far from the crowded, frenetic scene it promises to be today. The track was, in fact, sedate. Good views of the finish line were easy to find and so were empty seats. And Amanda Joyce of North Baltimore was working on a promising Pick 4 in which she needed to select the winners of four successive races to collect. Joyce, who has been smitten with racing ever since reading a Jane Smiley novel about the sport, said she'll be at today's Preakness and trying to do what most of the other 112,000 race fans hope to accomplish - pick a winner.
SPORTS
August 16, 2006
Good morning --Bettors-- Leave work early enough and you can still get to Laurel Park in time to lose some of the money you made that day.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
On Feb. 2, 1961, at 1 p.m., a train carrying fans to Bowie Race Course derailed near the race track, killing six and injuring more than 200. Undaunted, a number of passengers scrambled over the dead and wounded, smashed windows and hurried on foot to Bowie, in 15-degree cold, to place their bets before the first race. One man walked to the track with a broken collarbone. Another limped out of the woods nearby carrying a bag of money and one of his shoes. "I saw people with blood all over them, standing there (at the mutual windows)
SPORTS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
The finest in the world are here, horses and riders. The TV trucks and reporters and VIPs in business suits have been filling the place for days. It's Preakness Week, there's a buzz in the air, and even Donald "Coos" Cusick allows a lump to come to his throat. "It's the Indy 500, the World Series, the whole deal wrapped up in one," says Cusick, a grizzled man of 55 who has broken both shoulders and one wrist, mangled each hand and even fractured his back in service to the only place he has ever worked — Pimlico Race Course.
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