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NEWS
July 17, 1996
Pandro S. Berman, 91, who during a career that spanned four decades produced such acclaimed films as "Top Hat," "Morning Glory" and "The Blackboard Jungle," died Saturday.Mr. Berman died of congestive heart failure at his home in Beverly Hills, said grandson Cory Schaffel.The casts of Mr. Berman's films were a who's who of Hollywood from the 1930s through the '60s: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Katharine Hepburn, Bette Davis, Elizabeth Taylor, Gene Kelly and Sidney Poitier. Mr. Berman began his studio career at age 18.His many films ranged from the 1930s Astaire-Rogers dance favorites "The Gay Divorcee," "Swing Time" and "Shall We Dance," to Katharine Hepburn's Oscar-winning performance in "Morning Glory," and "Of Human Bondage," the 1934 drama that made Bette Davis a star.
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EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | October 19, 2011
100 Years Ago Escapees return From the Woodbine social column: "Miss Mary Roth returned to the neighborhood after spending the summer with relatives in Wilmington, Delaware. Mrs. John M. DeLashautt and daughter, Miss Mildred DeLashmutt, have returned from their apartments in Baltimore after spending the summer near hear. " Today, it's usually "snowbirds" who avoid the harsh winter weather of the north by flocking to Florida for a few months.
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NEWS
February 15, 1996
Adolf Galland, 83, one of Germany's most famous fighter pilots during World War II, died Friday at home in Germany after heart surgery.He is credited with shooting down 104 Allied planes during World War II.After his release from an American prisoner of war camp in 1947, he became an aviation consultant to Argentina and later to West Germany.Phil Regan, 89, the "singing cop" who left the New York City Police Department to star on Broadway and in Hollywood musicals, died Sunday in Santa Barbara, Calif.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2010
Old age ain't for sissies. — Bette Davis Her father had lived for a decade and a half in a big house on the Eastern Shore. Then he started showing signs of dementia. In 2008, Barbara Turner finally had to take the reins. It was tough enough that Turner, a retired newspaper journalist, was forced to move her dad into assisted living. But what should she do with his stuff? She wanted to keep it all — the chairs, the old photos, even the lawn equipment. But her own home started filling up. Then it hit her. "There's an opportunity cost for everything you keep," she says.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | January 3, 1993
Tom Smothers admits he was never particularly interested in having episodes of "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour" resurface on television."Maybe if people see them again, they wouldn't remember them with such fondness," Mr. Smothers said in a recent interview. "The emotions and feelings about the show are beautiful now. Why show them?"But cable's E! Entertainment Television is dusting off all 71 episodes of the landmark CBS series, which aired from 1967 to '69, and will air them weeknights beginning Monday.
FEATURES
By Robert Dominguez and Robert Dominguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
When it comes to Great Oscar Cat fights in History, Joan Rivers vs. Geena Davis is hardly Joan Crawford vs. Bette Davis.But with actress Geena Davis set to greet Academy Award hopefuls during ABC's new half-hour Oscar pre-show at 8 p.m. Sunday -- bumping Rivers off the red carpet during the last half-hour of her annual pre-show on cable's E! Entertainment channel -- the rival hosts have been exchanging catty quips worthy of the legendary hissing matches between Crawford and Bette Davis.Said Rivers about Geena Davis' new chores: "She may turn out to be fabulous -- there may be more to her than dimples and [breasts]
NEWS
February 8, 1994
Because of an editing error, the Joseph Cotten obituary did not run in yesterday's edition. LOS ANGELES -- Joseph Cotten, the polished Virginian who became a star with "Citizen Kane" and went on to play opposite Marilyn Monroe, Bette Davis, Ingrid Bergman and others, died of pneumonia Sunday at his Los Angeles home. He was 88.Mr. Cotten's smooth, low-key personality made him an ideal leading man for Hollywood's most famous actresses, and his versatility allowed him to play both villains ("Shadow of a Doubt")
NEWS
November 18, 2007
A gift: The Enoch Pratt Free Library announced last week that it is giving every Baltimore public school teacher, about 6,000 educators, a copy of the children's book The Three Questions. This beloved tale is one of the favorite books of Andres Alonso, new chief executive officer of Baltimore City public schools. "We would like to welcome Dr. Alonso to Baltimore by presenting this gift to our dedicated educators across the city," said Carla D. Hayden, executive director of the library. New on the shelf "A Slave No More" by David W. Blight -- Harcourt Slave narratives, some of the most powerful records of our past, are extremely rare, with only 55 post-Civil War narratives surviving.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | April 4, 2008
Alfred Hitchcock and funny glasses: What's not to love? The Charles Theatre's not-to-be-missed retrospective of Hitchcock's films continues this weekend with 1954's Dial M for Murder, presented in all its original three-dimensional splendor. The film stars Ray Milland as a cad who decides his wife (Grace Kelly) needs to be killed and blackmails someone into doing it. But things don't work out as planned. Hitchcock, almost alone among the directors who worked in 3-D during the process' brief Golden Age, tried using it for dramatic effect instead of simply having characters throw things at the audience.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
Movie trivia time:Who was the first big box office star for Warner Bros.?The huge Hollywood powerhouse, of course, would eventually encompass such giants as John Barrymore, Al Jolson, Bette Davis, James Cagney, Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart, Ruby Keeler and on and on to modern draws such as Clint Eastwood and Jack Nicholson.But this particular star did more than a dozen commercially successful films in the 1920s and, much later, would also become a radio and television series performer.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
The value of one man's taking a stand has never been more thrillingly depicted than in Fred Zinnemann's 1952 High Noon, airing at 6:30 p.m. on TCM. Gary Cooper won his second Best Actor Oscar for playing laconic lawman Will Kane, who starts off the film about to marry the lovely Amy Fowler (Grace Kelly, in one of her first roles) and settle down to a life of Quaker tranquillity, and ends it going up against a pack of bloodthirsty outlaws practically by himself. Cooper, of course, played every one of his characters laconic, a constant in his career that didn't always work.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | April 4, 2008
Alfred Hitchcock and funny glasses: What's not to love? The Charles Theatre's not-to-be-missed retrospective of Hitchcock's films continues this weekend with 1954's Dial M for Murder, presented in all its original three-dimensional splendor. The film stars Ray Milland as a cad who decides his wife (Grace Kelly) needs to be killed and blackmails someone into doing it. But things don't work out as planned. Hitchcock, almost alone among the directors who worked in 3-D during the process' brief Golden Age, tried using it for dramatic effect instead of simply having characters throw things at the audience.
NEWS
November 18, 2007
A gift: The Enoch Pratt Free Library announced last week that it is giving every Baltimore public school teacher, about 6,000 educators, a copy of the children's book The Three Questions. This beloved tale is one of the favorite books of Andres Alonso, new chief executive officer of Baltimore City public schools. "We would like to welcome Dr. Alonso to Baltimore by presenting this gift to our dedicated educators across the city," said Carla D. Hayden, executive director of the library. New on the shelf "A Slave No More" by David W. Blight -- Harcourt Slave narratives, some of the most powerful records of our past, are extremely rare, with only 55 post-Civil War narratives surviving.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 8, 2006
The Bette Davis Collection, Vol. 2 [Warner] $60 This set includes three new to video - Marked Woman (1937), The Man Who Came to Dinner (1941) and Old Acquaintance (1943) and spiffed-up versions of previously released Jezebel (1938) and What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962). Rounding out the disc is the documentary Stardust: The Bette Davis Story. Marked Woman is a hard-hitting melodrama loosely based on the life of gangster Lucky Luciano, who was imprisoned after prostitutes who worked in one of his brothels informed on him. Humphrey Bogart also stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 20, 2005
Ambrosia Parsley is just waking up, so that lilting, little-girl voice of hers sounds a bit worn. It's 8:30 in the morning in San Fernando Valley, Calif., where she's calling from her brother's home. The 33-year-old New York resident is on the West Coast gearing up to promote the latest album by her group, Shivaree. Who's Got Trouble? is a sophisticated, darkly witty collection of twangy saloon ballads. The CD is the trio's third full-length release and another dazzling showcase for Parsley, the group's focal point and chief songwriter.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
Billy Colucci lives the life of a poet-musician in the garret of a 200-year-old house in Fells Point. He's a jazz pianist. His music is intensely personal, dense, complex and pulsing with the swing without which it don't mean a thing. He'll play a rare concert tomorrow for the Jazz at Cool Places series at the First Unitarian Church, Charles and Franklin streets. Jeff Reed will be on bass and Mike Kuhl on drums. Colucci's been a Fells Point familiar for a couple decades, a noir figure adrift in a Generation Y world: interesting, talented, angry, moody and a little mysterious.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
The value of one man's taking a stand has never been more thrillingly depicted than in Fred Zinnemann's 1952 High Noon, airing at 6:30 p.m. on TCM. Gary Cooper won his second Best Actor Oscar for playing laconic lawman Will Kane, who starts off the film about to marry the lovely Amy Fowler (Grace Kelly, in one of her first roles) and settle down to a life of Quaker tranquillity, and ends it going up against a pack of bloodthirsty outlaws practically by himself. Cooper, of course, played every one of his characters laconic, a constant in his career that didn't always work.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 1, 1993
Lillian Gish, whose portrayals of fragile innocence graced the golden age of silent films and eventually extended into an eight-decade screen career, a testament to perpetuity that could last forever, is dead at 99.Her longtime personal manager, James Frasher, said yesterday the internationally recognized star died in her sleep in her stylish apartment on Manhattan's Sutton Place Saturday night."
FEATURES
By Robert Dominguez and Robert Dominguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
When it comes to Great Oscar Cat fights in History, Joan Rivers vs. Geena Davis is hardly Joan Crawford vs. Bette Davis.But with actress Geena Davis set to greet Academy Award hopefuls during ABC's new half-hour Oscar pre-show at 8 p.m. Sunday -- bumping Rivers off the red carpet during the last half-hour of her annual pre-show on cable's E! Entertainment channel -- the rival hosts have been exchanging catty quips worthy of the legendary hissing matches between Crawford and Bette Davis.Said Rivers about Geena Davis' new chores: "She may turn out to be fabulous -- there may be more to her than dimples and [breasts]
NEWS
July 17, 1996
Pandro S. Berman, 91, who during a career that spanned four decades produced such acclaimed films as "Top Hat," "Morning Glory" and "The Blackboard Jungle," died Saturday.Mr. Berman died of congestive heart failure at his home in Beverly Hills, said grandson Cory Schaffel.The casts of Mr. Berman's films were a who's who of Hollywood from the 1930s through the '60s: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Katharine Hepburn, Bette Davis, Elizabeth Taylor, Gene Kelly and Sidney Poitier. Mr. Berman began his studio career at age 18.His many films ranged from the 1930s Astaire-Rogers dance favorites "The Gay Divorcee," "Swing Time" and "Shall We Dance," to Katharine Hepburn's Oscar-winning performance in "Morning Glory," and "Of Human Bondage," the 1934 drama that made Bette Davis a star.
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