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July 26, 1991
CANTON, Mass. -- Deb Richard missed a one-foot putt early in the first round but birdied the last two holes to shoot a 5-under-par 67 and lead Pat Bradley by one stroke.Loretta Alderete eagled the final hole to join Nancy Scranton and Mitzi Edge in a tie for third at 69 on the 6,137-yard Blue Hill Country Club course.Richard started her round with birdie putts of 20 and 6 feet on the first two holes.Among the 15 players tied at 70, three strokes behind Richard, were Betsy King, winner of the Big Apple Classic last week, Hall of Famer JoAnne Carner and Baltimorean Tina Barrett.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | July 6, 2011
Betsy King is having golf nightmares again, like the one in which a tree is hindering her backswing — on the first tee. Or where she's trying to hack out from a locker. "That was the one thing nice about retirement," quipped the 55-year-old Hall of Famer, the oldest entrant at this week's U.S. Women's Open. It has been 51/2 years since King last teed it up in an LPGA event, stepping aside after the 2005 season to tend to her ailing parents. Her exemption for winning the 1989 and '90 Opens ran out long ago. She spends most of her days now with humanitarian efforts, taking groups to Africa to help build homes for orphans.
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SPORTS
December 16, 1991
DORADO, Puerto Rico -- Mike Hill became the biggest money-winner in American golf yesterday with his two-stroke victory in the Senior PGA Tour's season-ending Champions tournament.Hill collected $150,000 as the tournament winner and another $150,000 from a season-long bonus pool and finished the season with $1,065,657. That's almost twice the amount -- $573,724 -- he won in a 16-year career on the regular tour.Hill also surpassed the money total of the leader on the regular PGA Tour: Corey Pavin with $979,430.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
WILMINGTON, Del. - Betsy King's Friday began around 4 a.m., when the 45-year-old woke up with a splitting headache and upset stomach. Her day got worse when she hacked it around DuPont Country Club later that morning, shooting a 7-over-par 78. But yesterday was a different story for King, who slept quite well Friday night and came out for her third round with a spring in her step. She packaged four birdies with 14 pars and posted the first sub-par round of the day with a 67. The six-time major winner now sits at even par, seven shots back of leaders Juli Inkster and Wendy Ward.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | July 6, 2011
Betsy King is having golf nightmares again, like the one in which a tree is hindering her backswing — on the first tee. Or where she's trying to hack out from a locker. "That was the one thing nice about retirement," quipped the 55-year-old Hall of Famer, the oldest entrant at this week's U.S. Women's Open. It has been 51/2 years since King last teed it up in an LPGA event, stepping aside after the 2005 season to tend to her ailing parents. Her exemption for winning the 1989 and '90 Opens ran out long ago. She spends most of her days now with humanitarian efforts, taking groups to Africa to help build homes for orphans.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
WILMINGTON, Del. -- It has taken several years and a loss of confidence along the way, but Laura Davies says she finally has her golf game under control.It is one of the reasons the Englishwoman is a favorite for the 40th LPGA Championship, which begins tomorrow at Du Pont Country Club.This is the first year McDonald's has sponsored the championship, after backing its own event for the previous 13 years (the past seven here). Davies won here last year, beating Sherri Steinhauer by a stroke.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
BETHESDA -- For the past 10 months, Betsy King hasn't been in position to win a tournament. She was the leader going into yesterday's third round of the Mazda LPGA Championship, but the start of her round looked like more of the same."
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
BETHESDA -- At first, it was just a smile that spread wide across the face of Betsy King as she walked off the 18th tee at the Mazda LPGA Championship yesterday. But, with 10 months of frustration about to end, King no longer could contain her emotions as she broke into a slow trot along the right fairway, accommodating every outstretched hand offered by the gallery."I didn't think about [doing] it until I got over the crest of the hill," said King, not known for displaying her emotions. "I thought I had to do something."
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
WILMINGTON, Del. - Betsy King's Friday began around 4 a.m., when the 45-year-old woke up with a splitting headache and upset stomach. Her day got worse when she hacked it around DuPont Country Club later that morning, shooting a 7-over-par 78. But yesterday was a different story for King, who slept quite well Friday night and came out for her third round with a spring in her step. She packaged four birdies with 14 pars and posted the first sub-par round of the day with a 67. The six-time major winner now sits at even par, seven shots back of leaders Juli Inkster and Wendy Ward.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 20, 1991
ROCKLAND, Del. -- It has taken awhile, but Patty Sheehan has developed a philosophy that has seen her through good times and bad.The good includes Player of the Year and scoring awards to go with 26 wins on the Ladies Professional Golf Association Tour.The bad includes some disappointing tournament finishes, as well as having her San Francisco Bay area home destroyed by the 1989 earthquake."My philosophy is that everything happens for a purpose," Sheehan, the defending champion of the McDonald's Championship, said yesterday.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
WILMINGTON, Del. -- It has taken several years and a loss of confidence along the way, but Laura Davies says she finally has her golf game under control.It is one of the reasons the Englishwoman is a favorite for the 40th LPGA Championship, which begins tomorrow at Du Pont Country Club.This is the first year McDonald's has sponsored the championship, after backing its own event for the previous 13 years (the past seven here). Davies won here last year, beating Sherri Steinhauer by a stroke.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | September 16, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes.You can believe all that blather about the venerable Maryland Scholastic Association being a spit-and-polish outfit doing a super job if you want to, but there are 75 years worth of evidence to the contrary.This old boys' network, which has been dead for years but didn't have the good sense to lie down until voted out of existence the other night, was a model of exclusion: Girls play sports? Since when?It never really brought kids from the public, private and prep schools together in the sports that counted, but consistently allowed its members to go any which way their self-interest dictated.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 25, 1993
Links Lowdown:Betsy King says it doesn't get any better for her than when she's out on the practice range working on something. "Coming up with a shot is a thrill," she says, "particularly when you're able to then go out and pull it off in a tournament."The last time she was in these parts, Betsy came up with enough shots to last most golfers two lifetimes. Her scorecards read 68-66-67-66 and we're not talking the inaugural Skunk Hollow Invitational here. It was the $1 million LPGA Championship, a major, and King will be back at Bethesda Country Club June 7-13 defending that title.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | March 12, 1993
Bowling's King of Hill match is a fitting stepladder crownThe Pro Bowlers Association Tour is making its yearly Maryland stop this week, and if that isn't cause for celebration, I don't know what is. In fact, we're doubly blessed, for the Fair Lanes Open brings with it pro bowling's new King of the Hill format.It's enough to make a guy want to sing (with apologies to the late Roger Miller):Every week we get to see,Pro bowling on ABC.Year after year the same,You even know those guys by name.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 18, 1992
BETHESDA -- King. A rather appropriate name for a coronation wouldn't you say?That's what the Mazda LPGA Championship turned out to be over 72 holes and the last four days, the crowning of Betsy King, possessor of superlative strength or efficacy on the women's tour.It was on the ninth hole yesterday and after bringing the tight and picturesque Bethesda Country Club and the field to their knees that King pushed her second shot into the rough siding the green."When I got up and down [for par]
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
BETHESDA -- At first, it was just a smile that spread wide across the face of Betsy King as she walked off the 18th tee at the Mazda LPGA Championship yesterday. But, with 10 months of frustration about to end, King no longer could contain her emotions as she broke into a slow trot along the right fairway, accommodating every outstretched hand offered by the gallery."I didn't think about [doing] it until I got over the crest of the hill," said King, not known for displaying her emotions. "I thought I had to do something."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | September 16, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes.You can believe all that blather about the venerable Maryland Scholastic Association being a spit-and-polish outfit doing a super job if you want to, but there are 75 years worth of evidence to the contrary.This old boys' network, which has been dead for years but didn't have the good sense to lie down until voted out of existence the other night, was a model of exclusion: Girls play sports? Since when?It never really brought kids from the public, private and prep schools together in the sports that counted, but consistently allowed its members to go any which way their self-interest dictated.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 25, 1993
Links Lowdown:Betsy King says it doesn't get any better for her than when she's out on the practice range working on something. "Coming up with a shot is a thrill," she says, "particularly when you're able to then go out and pull it off in a tournament."The last time she was in these parts, Betsy came up with enough shots to last most golfers two lifetimes. Her scorecards read 68-66-67-66 and we're not talking the inaugural Skunk Hollow Invitational here. It was the $1 million LPGA Championship, a major, and King will be back at Bethesda Country Club June 7-13 defending that title.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
BETHESDA -- For the past 10 months, Betsy King hasn't been in position to win a tournament. She was the leader going into yesterday's third round of the Mazda LPGA Championship, but the start of her round looked like more of the same."
SPORTS
December 16, 1991
DORADO, Puerto Rico -- Mike Hill became the biggest money-winner in American golf yesterday with his two-stroke victory in the Senior PGA Tour's season-ending Champions tournament.Hill collected $150,000 as the tournament winner and another $150,000 from a season-long bonus pool and finished the season with $1,065,657. That's almost twice the amount -- $573,724 -- he won in a 16-year career on the regular tour.Hill also surpassed the money total of the leader on the regular PGA Tour: Corey Pavin with $979,430.
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