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Betsey Johnson

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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2009
Interior designer Alisha Pitarra's design sense goes beyond her job at The House Downtown, a home furnishings store in Belvedere Square. The 29-year-old Perry Hall resident loves to decorate herself, as well. "I love to get a little glamorous; mix and match trends with vintage." Pitarra credits her husband, Greg Pitarra, owner of Bruno's Hair Design, with tending to her locks. But she knows how to tend to her frocks, like the cute black number she wore to a My Place Project fundraiser at the store.
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NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2009
Interior designer Alisha Pitarra's design sense goes beyond her job at The House Downtown, a home furnishings store in Belvedere Square. The 29-year-old Perry Hall resident loves to decorate herself, as well. "I love to get a little glamorous; mix and match trends with vintage." Pitarra credits her husband, Greg Pitarra, owner of Bruno's Hair Design, with tending to her locks. But she knows how to tend to her frocks, like the cute black number she wore to a My Place Project fundraiser at the store.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | May 6, 2001
At the Miss U.S.A. pageant in March, Miss Maryland Megan Gunning took home the style award, given out by Clairol to "the delegate who best exemplifies a sense of personal style" -- meaning good hair, good clothes and good runway persona. It was no big surprise: Appearance is a big part of Gunning's world, and not just her own, either. The 22-year-old runs her own image-consulting business (called "Vis a Vis") from her hometown of Fallston and works as a hairstylist and makeup artist at Heaventouch Spa & Salon in Timonium.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 8, 2007
NEW YORK -- When women walk into their nearest department store or boutique, credit card in hand, generally they're not looking for the most artistic or fanciful or award-winning thing on the rack. They're looking for something they can wear. Many fashion seasons have gone by with high-end designers seeming to forget that detail. But this week, under the tents at Bryant Park, the country's most well-known designers have begun showing fall collections that get back to that basic idea - without sacrificing that certain something that we come to expect from Seventh Avenue talents.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 8, 2007
NEW YORK -- When women walk into their nearest department store or boutique, credit card in hand, generally they're not looking for the most artistic or fanciful or award-winning thing on the rack. They're looking for something they can wear. Many fashion seasons have gone by with high-end designers seeming to forget that detail. But this week, under the tents at Bryant Park, the country's most well-known designers have begun showing fall collections that get back to that basic idea - without sacrificing that certain something that we come to expect from Seventh Avenue talents.
NEWS
By Marylou Luther and Marylou Luther,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 1999
We asked 20 famous designers to name the single most important fashion influence of the century. Here's what they said:Tommy Hilfiger: RockTodd Oldham: MuicHan Feng: MinisRalph Lauren: FilmGeoffrey Beene: HollywoodChristian Francis Roth: ElectricityBetsey Johnson: MTVNicole Miller: LycraCarolina Herrera: USAJohn Bartlett: DiversityMark Badgley and James Mischka (Badgley Mischka): GlamourOscar de la Renta: T-shirtsjeans Chanelinthe'20sDiane Von Furstenberg: FreedomGene Meyer: ManhattanIsaac Mizrahi: UndressDonna Karan: JeansTom Ford (Gucci)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1994
She designs jewelry, but Jill Beninato says clothes matter most to her.Whether she's plying metals in her Northeast Baltimore studio-home or working at Tomlinson Craft Collection in Towson, she first considers what outfit to wear (Will it be the ribbed tuxedo jacket, crocheted tank top or baby doll dress?) and then selects her accessories.She describes her collection of modern pins and earrings carried in 130 galleries across the country (including Tomlinson) as "nature inspired, primitive and sophisticated."
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2009
I nterior designer Alisha Pitarra's design sense goes beyond her job at The House Downtown, a home furnishings store in Belvedere Square. The 29-year-old Perry Hall resident loves to decorate herself, as well. "I love to get a little glamorous; mix and match trends with vintage." Pitarra credits her husband, Greg Pitarra, owner of Bruno's Hair Design, with tending to her locks. But she knows how to tend to her frocks, like the cute black number she wore to a My Place Project fundraiser at the store.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | November 23, 1992
Out of the mouths of babes come trends: Believe it or not, th pacifier may be this year's hot accessory.Anyone past puberty wearing or using one isn't regressing, but being fashion-forward.Pacifiers and peace pendants hang side by side in local teen accessory stores -- and some kids admit to scouring baby departments for the right touch.Do pacifiers signify a yearning for inner peace in the youth of the '90s? Nah, they're more of a fad than a philosophy.Young sales clerks at Contempo track pacifiers to rap and Public Enemy's Flavor Flav.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Kristin Weisman loves a look that's "kind of bohemian, but at the same time, really feminine. I like girly things that have a little funk to them." Her style mirrors her professional life. The 30-year-old Parkville resident is an English teacher at Kenwood High School, a part-time burlesque performer with the Gilded Lily troupe, and a part-time yoga instructor. We "glimpsed" Weisman at another of her part-time gigs — as a hostess at Hampden's hip Rocket to Venus restaurant — in a navy rayon Sine romper and a wide segmented brown leather belt — both from Anthropologie.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | May 6, 2001
At the Miss U.S.A. pageant in March, Miss Maryland Megan Gunning took home the style award, given out by Clairol to "the delegate who best exemplifies a sense of personal style" -- meaning good hair, good clothes and good runway persona. It was no big surprise: Appearance is a big part of Gunning's world, and not just her own, either. The 22-year-old runs her own image-consulting business (called "Vis a Vis") from her hometown of Fallston and works as a hairstylist and makeup artist at Heaventouch Spa & Salon in Timonium.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO | December 2, 2007
Lilac Bijoux 511 E. Belvedere Square 410-323-4333 or lilacbijoux.com Open 10 a.m.-6 Monday-Saturday; noon-5 Sunday Lilac Bijoux, an Annapolis jewelery and accessories shop, has opened a second location at Belvedere Square in North Baltimore. Co-owners Fern Elliott and Beth Ingham share a playful eye and an appreciation for reasonably priced baubles with a fine touch. Earrings and other small pieces start in the $20 range. "We try not to have anything more than $300," Elliott says. Matte sterling silver pieces by Kelim, a Switzerland design firm, are formed with interlocking petals and other organic shapes.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 27, 1991
NEW YORK -- From designers attending a reception in New York for the fashion press given by the Council of Fashion Designers of America, I repeatedly heard the same refrain:Designers don't dictate anymore. They listen to customers.So which one of you has been telling them women want to wear crinolines?I ask because the rest of us would like to find you and express our profound appreciation, perhaps by stuffing several yards of tulle down your throat.Stiff, frilly petticoats have returned in abundance.
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