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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | December 24, 1991
Two men have been charged with operating what police describe as a major gambling operation in northern Anne Arundel County that took in an estimated $75,000 a week.County police said they seized money and betting slips that indicated a large-scale book-making business. Police said their investigation started five months ago with a tip from the Federal Bureau of Investigation."It is a very significant gambling operation," Anne Arundel County Police Chief Robert P. Russell said. "We think it covers the county pretty well."
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - A Baltimore man who tried to steal millions of dollars through rigged bets on horse races was the last of three men to join the conspiracy and the one who broke the fewest laws, yet he could spend the most time in prison. Derrick Davis pleaded guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court to a single count of conspiracy to commit fraud. He admitted to cashing $22,000 in counterfeit betting tickets and helping an accomplice rig bets to generate a $3.1 million payout from this year's Breeders' Cup. "I'm truly sorry and regret my involvement in this whole thing.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2002
ELKTON - When the phone call came to his home on a Sunday afternoon informing Paul Berube that some high-payout bets on the Breeders' Cup may have been rigged by thieves armed with computers, he wasn't shocked. Berube, president of the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau, has watched as the sport burst in a few decades from the confines of racetracks to the nearly ungovernable realm of cyberspace. A major heist involving the computers that store and sort the wagers seemed, well, inevitable.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 16, 2004
If Paris Hilton can earn a series for her misadventures, why can't television's beloved old stars share their colorful lives in a show? After all, they've provided years of entertainment, a feat beyond Hilton's grasp. We won't always have this Paris. The cable channel TV Land is giving veteran actors their close-ups in the reality series Living in TV Land. The Wednesday premiere focuses on Dick Van Patten, who's zanier than the father he played on Eight Is Enough from 1977 to 1981. Van Patten is such a dynamic, competitive figure at 75 that he launches Living in TV Land with gusto.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
Wayne Gretzky, hockey's all-time greatest player and the Phoenix Coyotes' head coach, may find he was wrong when he said a few days ago that he is not, was not and "not going to be involved" in the sports gambling investigation that has snared his associate coach, Rick Tocchet. Gretzky was captured on a New Jersey State Police wiretap apparently discussing how to avoid having his wife, actress Janet Jones, implicated in the illegal sports wagering ring, an unnamed source with knowledge of the probe told the Associated Press yesterday.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | December 14, 1993
Community groups who had opposed the opening of the state's first off-track betting parlor in Urbana earlier this year were absent yesterday when the Maryland Racing Commission renewed the parlor's license for 1994 at the board's monthly meeting."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2004
The Maryland Racing Commission met for a second straight day yesterday but adjourned without resolving the ownership issue at Rosecroft Raceway or the simulcast dispute between the standardbred and thoroughbred factions. The commission won't decide until it meets again in May whether Northwind Racing is an acceptable buyer for Rosecroft, the struggling harness track in Prince George's County. Commissioners heard more testimony yesterday at Pimlico - after opening the hearing Tuesday at the North East Racing and Sports Club in North East - but adjourned with more witnesses still to testify.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 22, 2005
I LIKE THE cell phone thing at the racetrack. In the old days, you might have been arrested for taking bets over the phone. Now a guy like Dave Miller, the auto mechanic ("I'm a technician," he says), can lean over the hot dog counter in the grandstand, cell phone to his ear, taking bets on the 130th Preakness from his father-in-law, Lawrence, and his brother, Teddy. He can include the whole family in Baltimore's great day at the track. Nice. Anyone with any track sense would recognize Miller as a hard-core horse player and slide up next to the guy. For me, it was almost unavoidable.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
It's far from the proverbial sure thing, but an afternoon wager on a favorite at Pimlico might be the state's best bet.And the odds of winning the top prize in keno -- the fast-paced numbers game state lawmakers are counting on to help balance the public books -- are actually worse than hitting Lotto's elusive jackpot.A statistical comparison of Maryland's numerous forms of legal gambling shows a wide spread of probabilities. Although many people opt for one game over another for reasons other than odds, such as a love for horses, some bets make more sense than others.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1998
It's your first time to the track, and you're wondering: seersucker suit or Love Nut T-shirt?The truth is, either one may be appropriate, depending on where you will be sitting during the race. You see, the Preakness isactually a collection of events, all contained - barely, in some cases - by the confines of Old Hilltop.Preparation, mental and otherwise, is the key.Out on the notorious infield, for example, home of the contraband vodka, the briefer may be the better if the weather is as hot as early forecasts suggest.
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