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July 28, 2011
Stamp Out Cancer - sponsored by the B-More Stampers, held at Camp Chapel United Methodist Church, 5000 East Joppa Road, Perry Hall, a day of stamping and scrapping, Aug. 20, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $40 includes make and takes, boxed lunch and donation to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation and The American Cancer Society. bmorestampers@gmail.com for a registration form. Nancy Amato, 410-661-4465 or http://www.nancyamato.stampinup.net. Outdoor Concert - Jerusalem Mill Village, Gunpowder Falls State Park, 2813 Jerusalem Road, Kingsville, Aug. 7, 6 p.m. with classic rock music of the Great Train Robbery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pasky Pascual | October 8, 2014
In the beginning, it wasn't about the money. But if the baseball gods deal you a 60 to 80 percent chance of winning, what would you do? On opening day of last year's baseball season, a friend and I waited for our beloved Washington Nationals to take the field under a spring sky that hung above us like blue scrim. To pass the time, we talked shop. We are science geeks, obsessed with guiding public policy with empiricism, with the deluge of information that is "big data. " That afternoon, giddy over Bryce Harper's two home runs, I resolved to conduct an experiment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Who pays for the food involved when mayors and governors make bets on football games? When it comes to Faidley's crab cakes, the centerpiece of the market package Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has wagered on Sunday's AFC championship game, Faidley's is prepared to provide the goods. Faidley's owner Bill Devine said he has promised and provided crab cakes for municipal bets before, dating back to the William Donald Schaefer era. "It's a feel-good gesture," said Devine about his make-good promise.
BUSINESS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The circle of political power brokers and deep-pocketed investors hatched their plan more than three years ago, seeing promise in a project deemed wildly unrealistic by some and stubbornly unattainable by others. With billions in backing from the Japanese government, the Northeast Maglev group envisions building a futuristic magnetic levitation or "maglev" train capable of transporting Baltimore homeowners to Washington jobs in 15 minutes, at speeds above 300 mph. Plenty in Maryland think it will never happen or shouldn't, given the price tag in excess of $10 billion.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Every morning, Monday through Friday, blogger Matt Vensel will hook you up with reading material -- mostly on the Ravens but with some other Baltimore sports stuff, too -- to skim through as you slug down coffee and slack off at the start of your workday. That way he'll have an excuse to do the same to start his workday, too. On Tuesday, someone from the Bovada sportsbook sent me over some interesting Ravens prop bets. Now I'm not encouraging gambling, but it is fun to talk about over/unders.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | July 28, 1993
Beginning today, Maryland's six wagering outlets will take bets on full-card simulcasts from Saratoga and Del Mar, two of the nation's great resort racetracks that open this afternoon.
BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory | May 18, 1991
Imagine you placed a $10 bet on a horse tagged with 10-to-1 odds for today's Preakness Stakes. Like a dream come true, that long shot comes through.But instead of the odds you were promised before the race, the track makes a mistake. Your payout is a meager $36 instead of the $100 you anticipated.That's just how Henry L. Straus got burned at a small Havre de Grace racetrack almost 70 years ago.Today, the stakes are much higher. Pimlico Race Course officials expect to rake in about $8 million in bets on the 116th running of the Preakness.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1997
Bettors hoping to make a lucky dollar with a Baltimore County bookmaker instead found themselves out of luck and out of money, the U.S. attorney's office said.Christopher T. Buettner of Reisterstown pleaded guilty to two counts of wire fraud in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday. In one case, Buettner admitted operating a "sports information service" where he and other accomplices lured customers into wiring more than $700,000 into what the customers thought was a Las Vegas account to be used to make bets on sporting events, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | September 12, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly stated the plea made and sentence received by one of six men charged in a gambling conspiracy. Kevin Charles Keller of Baltimore did not plead guilty and was not ordered to perform community service. His case was placed on the court's stet, or inactive docket. Charges will be dropped if he has no similar charge filed against him within one year.The Sun regrets the error.Six men tied to a football betting operation in Baltimore City and Baltimore and Harford counties pleaded guilty to gambling conspiracy charges yesterday in Harford District Court.
SPORTS
By Dale Austin | September 23, 1990
John E. Mooney is tired of watching buses from Maryland go through Delaware on their way to the slot machines at Atlantic City, N.J., so he's doing something about it.Mooney, general manager at Delaware Park, is convinced that most of the gamblers are slot-machine types and not headed for the tables."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Over the past decade, American casino-goers have come to expect more than just free drinks at the poker table. They want great food, too. Big-name chefs and strong culinary skills have become de rigeur at casinos, and even non-gamblers recognize that casino-adjacent restaurants might be worth a try. At Hanover's Maryland Live! Casino, the newest culinary outpost, Luk Fu, is a pan-Asian restaurant located right on the casino floor. While the food at Luk Fu is likable, service is slower than it should be, especially in an action-packed casino.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Joan Mainhart had wrapped up a moderately successful day playing the slots at Maryland Live - walking in with $100, stepping out with $150 - but standing outside the casino in the afternoon sun Friday she considered whether she would take a shot at a million-dollar jackpot for $500 a spin. The retired IRS paralegal from Linthicum thought a moment and came to a definite maybe: "Only if I hit the lottery, then I might splurge. " Otherwise, she said, "there's just no way. " From the regular folks like Mainhart who play the quarter and dollar machines to the high-rollers who think nothing of pumping a few grand into a slot machine, people will have their chance soon enough at the state's biggest slots jackpot as Maryland Live unveils a new $1 million machine at 11 p.m. Saturday.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Sports Illustrated's Peter King, who is touring NFL training camp sites in a neat little RV with his MMQB crew, had an interesting nugget from Ravens camp in his column this morning . Quarterback Joe Flacco and veteran receiver Steve Smith are working to get on the same page this camp, one $25 Starbucks gift card at a time. Every time the two disagree on a defensive read, they go to the tape and determine who was right. I'll let King elaborate: Case in point: Smith and Flacco viewed one adjusted Smith route differently, causing an errant throw; Smith said he was reading a Cover-2 alignment by the defense.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
On Sunday night, Walmart aired a commercial promoting watermelon during the BET Awards, one of the most popular TV programs among African-American households. The commercial features a grower who says "summertime is watermelon time. " The farmer extols the virtues of tending his crop and also of his relationship with Walmart, which offers a money-back guarantee that its watermelon will be fresh. With the Fourth of July right around the corner, consumption of the luscious red fruit is reaching its peak.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
The owners of California Chrome might have had to face the world after the colt fell short of a Triple Crown victory Saturday, but Tim McCoig faced an even tougher crowd after the loss: his wife. "It's not a good day in my household. I just lost a week's paycheck," the Owings Mills resident said just moments after the Belmont Stakes favorite, who could have become the first Triple Crown winner in 36 years, finished tied for fourth. McCoig was among the group of people who gathered at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday in hopes of watching California Chrome continue his gallop into history.
SPORTS
By Liam Durbin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
The California Chrome doubters who were talking about his slow Kentucky Derby time had to find something else to nitpick when California Chrome posted the fastest Preakness time since Curlin in 2007. And some who still remain doubters today have suggested that California Chrome's successes in the first two legs of the Triple Crown have had an element of luck in them. Every clean trip is fortunate, of course, but California Chrome has a way of making his own luck. In the Derby, he stayed close to an honest pace and avoided traffic problems that doomed some others.
NEWS
By Jerry Crowe and Jerry Crowe,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
Gamblers, rejoice. If the Super Bowl weren't occasionally deadly dull, you probably wouldn't be able to bet today on which will be greater, the number of passes caught by Marvin Harrison against the Chicago Bears in Miami or the number of free throws made by LeBron James against the Detroit Pistons in Cleveland. Or whether Bears Coach Lovie Smith or the Indianapolis Colts' Tony Dungy will slam his headset, what color the players' sports drinks will be or whether Prince will split his pants open during the halftime show.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2000
Which horse will win the race is far from the only intrigue involved in horse racing. Politics and making law may be the greatest intrigues of all. In Annapolis, during the legislative session under way until April 10, legislators ponder bills related to horse racing. Well, some legislators do. Many could care less about horse racing, if you want to know the truth. And some who care about the sport don't understand its underlying complexities. Simulcasting, sharing revenues, funding purses, financing bonds, soothing opposing factions.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown - a candidate in the Democratic gubernatorial primary - says he attended the Preakness Day as an "official state function" rather than a campaign event. He may be duty-bound to attend Maryland's signature horse-racing event, but that didn't prevent Brown and his wife, Karmen, from having some fun. And placing what he called “low-wager” bets. Not coincidentally, all of his picks had Maryland connections. Brown went with favorite California Chrome to win the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Liam Durbin | May 15, 2014
[Editor's note: Liam Durbin is owner/handicapper of e-ponies.com and creator of the One Click Pony, Pro Picks Mobile and Exacta Max apps.] RACE 1 Analysis: Relentless Ride has been making a decent living out of finishing second or third. Has only missed the board once in eight starts. The only case to be made for him breaking the curse Saturday is that the field is not particularly strong. He dropped in class last time but didn't pop. Should do so Saturday with the added distance.
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