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April 5, 2011
As a retiree from Bethlehem Steel who lost two thirds of his pension and has no health care, I can't feel sorry for these government union workers ("Lawmakers reach deal on pensions, retiree health care," April 5) as tens of thousands of workers lost their benefits. I don't think that these people understand that all the things they receive are only good for the life of the contract. When there is no money, then all benefits stop, and their complaints about promises made — these can't be met. Beth Steel made promises to their employees also.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Arthur V. D'Orazio, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. worker and musician, died Sunday of a heart attack at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Alessandro D'Orazio, a garment worker, and Elizabeth Grue D'Orazio, a homemaker, Arthur Vincent D'Orazio was born in Baltimore and raised near North Avenue and Fayette Street. He was a 1938 graduate of the old Thomas A. Edison Vocational High School at Howard and Centre streets. During World War II, he served with the 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment and fought in the New Guinea and Corregidor campaigns.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Salvatore J. Russo, a retired Bethlehem Steel timekeeper and World War II veteran, died of diabetic complications Sunday at Emeritus Senior Living in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 94. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Florence and Antonio Russo, Italian immigrants who lived on Berger Avenue. After attending the Polytechnic Institute, he worked at the family's Belair Market fruit and produce business in Oldtown. Family members said he was inducted into the Army in early 1941.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Salvatore J. Russo, a retired Bethlehem Steel timekeeper and World War II veteran, died of diabetic complications Sunday at Emeritus Senior Living in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 94. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Florence and Antonio Russo, Italian immigrants who lived on Berger Avenue. After attending the Polytechnic Institute, he worked at the family's Belair Market fruit and produce business in Oldtown. Family members said he was inducted into the Army in early 1941.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Lionel L. Bass Jr., a retired Bethlehem Steel general foreman and decorated Korean War combat veteran, died of cancer complications Dec. 2 at his Timonium home. He was 82. The son of Lionel L. Bass Sr. and Barbara Ellen Grebner, he was born in Baltimore and lived briefly in the family's Highlandtown home. His parents died of tuberculosis. He was born with the disease and spent his first four years as a patient at the old Baltimore City Hospitals at Bayview. "He never learned to talk until he was 4 years old," said his daughter, Deborah Bass Bowden of Timonium.
NEWS
August 4, 1995
The Baltimore County government better be careful. In the wake of the Stuart Berger buyout and Evening Sun accounts of a special county tax break for Bethlehem Steel, the jurisdiction could become known as an easy mark. Given its stagnant fiscal condition, the county and its elected leaders can ill afford such a reputation.A case can be made for the Beth Steel tax relief: It helped theSparrows Point company stabilize after a rocky period during the mid-1980s, when the steel giant was staggered by high labor costs and foreign competition.
BUSINESS
By Matt Assad and Matt Assad,Morning Call | January 17, 2007
BETHLEHEM, Pa. -- For some people, Bethlehem Steel ended when the blast furnaces on this city's South Side went cold in 1995. For others, it was the day the builder of the Golden Gate Bridge filed for bankruptcy in 2001, or when the company was sold in 2003. But for the 50 employees who spent most of their careers watching friends get laid off, that day came Friday, when they left Martin Tower for the last time. Mary Deutsch, a 38-year billing analyst, knows Bethlehem Steel hasn't signed her checks since 2003.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Bethlehem Steel Corp. is exploring whether to rebuild and reopen a controversial coke oven battery at its Sparrows Point mill, which it closed in 1991 after environmental disputes that cost the company $3.5 million in fines and led to the layoff of 400 workers.The company said it has not decided whether to rebuild one of its three old coke ovens, which bake coal until the heat converts it into coke. Coke is used to fire ultra-hot steelmaking furnaces.But Beth Steel has filed a permit application with the state Department of the Environment.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Bethlehem Steel Corp. saw its profits all but evaporate during the first three months of the year, the company said yesterday, buffeted by low steel prices, harsh winter weather that left four feet of water in one Pennsylvania mill, and a strike at General Motors Corp.The Pennsylvania steel company said it earned $100,000 in the first quarter, down from $52.5 million in the same months of 1995. This year's first-quarter sales were $1.12 billion, down about $120 million.Charles Bradford, a steel industry analyst at New York-based UBS Securities, said he actually had expected the earnings to be worse, given all the bad news during the quarter.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
Baltimore County has finally reached a tentative agreement with Bethlehem Steel Corp. under which the county is to acquire 388 acres near the steelmaker's Sparrows Point plant for an industrial park and another 26 acres for Fire Department facilities.Negotiations over the property had dragged on for three years and through two county government administrations while the giant steelmaker enjoyed more than $3 million in annual tax breaks.The agreement was reached after a four-hour meeting with company officials Aug. 29, according to county officials, but has not yet been put into writing and signed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Lionel L. Bass Jr., a retired Bethlehem Steel general foreman and decorated Korean War combat veteran, died of cancer complications Dec. 2 at his Timonium home. He was 82. The son of Lionel L. Bass Sr. and Barbara Ellen Grebner, he was born in Baltimore and lived briefly in the family's Highlandtown home. His parents died of tuberculosis. He was born with the disease and spent his first four years as a patient at the old Baltimore City Hospitals at Bayview. "He never learned to talk until he was 4 years old," said his daughter, Deborah Bass Bowden of Timonium.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Roland V. "Danny" Danielson, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. naval architect and avid outdoorsman, died Nov. 17 of renal failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 92. The son of Swedish and Danish immigrants, Roland Victor Danielson was born and raised in Cambridge, Mass. After graduating from Cambridge public schools, Mr. Danielson was awarded a scholarship to attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which he earned his bachelor's degree in 1942 in marine engineering.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
As a retiree from Bethlehem Steel who lost two thirds of his pension and has no health care, I can't feel sorry for these government union workers ("Lawmakers reach deal on pensions, retiree health care," April 5) as tens of thousands of workers lost their benefits. I don't think that these people understand that all the things they receive are only good for the life of the contract. When there is no money, then all benefits stop, and their complaints about promises made — these can't be met. Beth Steel made promises to their employees also.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 13, 2009
Robert Paul Ward Sr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. supervisor and longtime legislative aide to state Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr., died Saturday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Millers Island resident was 69. Mr. Ward was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown. After graduating from Calvert Hall College High School in 1957, he served in the Maryland National Guard. He went to work for Bethlehem Steel at Sparrows Point in 1960, and at the time of his retirement in 1986, he was a supervisor in the technical information department.
NEWS
May 29, 2008
Norbert Joseph Rottloff Sr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. engineer, died of heart disease Saturday at Franklin Square Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on Franklin Street, he attended St. Bernardine's Parochial School and was a member of its drum and bugle corps. His studies at Polytechnic Institute were interrupted by service in the Navy during World War II. He later earned a diploma at City College and received a physics degree at Loyola College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 6, 2008
Henson Leo Jackson, a retired steelworker who in his retirement was a popular Mr. Fix-it, died of cancer complications Tuesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The West Baltimore resident was 79. Mr. Jackson was born in Clarksville and raised near Fort Holabird. He left Baltimore County public schools in the ninth grade and went to work to support his family. From 1945 to 1948, he served in the Army as a clerk. While in the service, he was trained as a mechanic and carpenter. After his discharge, he drove a cab part time and then worked at Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
Baltimore County officials want to take another look at the agreement that gives Bethlehem Steel Corp. a $3 million-a-year tax break in exchange for the rights to 300 acres of land, but they say they won't be deterred from trying other development projects.County Executive C. A. "Dutch" Ruppersberger III said he will review the 7-year-old agreement once he gets a recommendation from his economic development department. The department is reviewing whether the county should take title to the Sparrows Point property despite serious concerns, including potential environmental hazards.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Joe Nawrozki and Andrea K. Walker and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2002
When a federal agency takes over Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s severely underfunded pension plan today, 90 percent of retirees probably won't even notice the difference - but that hasn't stopped them from worrying. "They will not see any change in their monthly pension check," said Bruce E. Davis, counsel to the Retired Employees Benefits Coalition, which represents the company's retired salaried workers. "It will just come from a federal agency and not from Bethlehem." The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | December 27, 2007
Milton Henry Leubecker, a retired general manager of the old Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Key Highway Shipyard at the base of Federal Hill, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Monday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised in Fullerton, he was a 1947 Kenwood High School graduate. He then joined the steel firm's Key Highway ship-repair yard as a machinist apprentice. He enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve's 11th Engineer Battalion and served during the Korean War. After his release from active duty, he returned to Key Highway and at night earned his Bachelor of Science degree at the John Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Allison Connolly and Tricia Bishop and Allison Connolly and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTERS | October 19, 2007
Thousands of local Bethlehem Steel retirees are being told that their pensions will soon be cut, and 1,100 people will have to pay money back. It's the third blow in four years for the retirees, who lost their medical benefits in 2003 and then portions of their promised pensions after the federal Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. took control of the funds from bankrupt Bethlehem Steel. Letters announcing the adjustments began arriving last month. "Yeah, I got the U.S. government's `nasty gram' in the mail," said retired millwright Kenneth Carroll Sr., 73, of White Marsh.
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