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Beth Botsford

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NEWS
July 26, 1996
CONGRATULATIONS are in order for Timonium's Beth Botsford, who this week put two gold medals around her neck and put her hometown and swim club on the map. The NTC 15-year-old swimmer, with a yen for Sesame Street puppets, became the first American woman to win gold in an Olympiad noted for its abundance of female talent.She was first in the 100-meter backstroke Monday and led the victorious 4x100 medley relay team Wednesday at the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center. Alas, she failed to qualify yesterday for the finals in what was deemed her most promising event, the 200-meter backstroke.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 11, 2014
Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame Native Dancer, five others to be inducted in November Racehorse Native Dancer, swimmer Beth Botsford , baseball-football players Tommy Brown and Brian Jordan , lacrosse player and coach Bob Scott and figure skater Kimmie Meissner will be inducted into the Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame on Nov. 13 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie. In addition, the Hall will present the John Steadman Lifetime Achievement Award, which recognizes the contribution of individuals over a long career of supporting and advancing athletics in the state of Maryland, to the late Earl Banks , who was the football coach at Morgan State.
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FEATURES
By SANDRA MCKEE | June 23, 1996
You watch them swimming: stroke after stroke, yard after yard, endless lap after endless lap. You watch them and you wonder where the joy comes from. You wonder what it is that inspires them. You wonder what it is that makes them want to do it. Over and over. Day after day. Year after year.Beth Botsford and Whitney Metzler emerge from the pool at the Meadowbrook Aquatic and Fitness Center in Mount Washington. Both are slim, with well-muscled legs. Both have brilliant smiles and sparkling eyes.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
The local hero has become an international sports star, but swimming wunderkind Michael Phelps came home from the World Championships in Barcelona, Spain, on Thursday intent on getting right back into his regular routine. That won't be easy. The 18-year-old world-record holder from the North Baltimore Aquatic Club put on such a show in Spain that life might never be the same. He won three gold medals and two silvers, set five world records and continued to evoke comparisons to Mark Spitz, who won seven gold medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - If Beth Botsford makes another Olympic swim team tomorrow night, she'll be ecstatic. If she doesn't, she'll still be a happy sophomore at the University of Arizona, a teen-ager whose idea of an escape is a long Sunday drive into the Santa Catalina Mountains in search of a good piece of pie. "I'm a sucker for the sun," Botsford said. "It's never cold in Tucson; it never rains. I could live out there and be a happy girl all my life. This is the most fun I've had in years."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff | July 27, 1997
Back and forth, Beth Botsford churns from one end of the pool to the other. She and her teammates form a drill team ofexquisitely precise fish. It's lulling, almost hypnotic, to watch them cut through the water as one, seemingly guided by an underwater metronome. For two straight hours, the water is their entire world: They swim slow to warm up. They swim fast to build speed. They swim long for endurance. They swim gently to cool down.It is, to state the obvious, a lot of swimming, especially when you consider how very little of it the public ultimately sees: One minute, 1.19 seconds, for example, in the case of Beth Botsford's gold medal performance in the 100-meter backstroke last July.
SPORTS
By SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
North Baltimore Aquatic Club teammates and friends of Beth Botsford turned out more than 100 strong at BWI Airport last night to welcome home the Olympic swimming champion.The Garrison Forest School sophomore was greeted by balloons and signs proclaiming, "We Love You, Beth" and "Congratulations, Beth Botsford, Gold Medal(s) Winner." The "s" was inserted after she won her second gold."The week was exciting and fun, like nothing I had ever done before," said Botsford, who won the 100-meter backstroke and swam the leadoff backstroke leg in the 400 medley relay.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1995
Brittany White became the sixth North Baltimore Aquatic Club member to qualify for the U.S. Olympic swimming trials next March in Indianapolis.White, a junior-to-be at Dulaney High, swam the 400-meter individual medley in 4 minutes, 55.66 seconds -- almost one second under the qualifying time -- in NBAC's 9th Annual Long Course Championships over the weekend at the Meadowbrook Aquatic Center.White was second to NBAC teammate Whitney Metzler, whose winning time was 4:51.70. Metzler already has qualified for the trials in the 400 and 200 IM.NBAC's other qualifiers are Anita Nall (100 and 200 breaststroke)
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
Did you see the medal?That's what John Lurz wanted to know yesterday, asking his swimming buddies at the North Baltimore Aquatic Center: "Did you see the medal?"He was talking about the gold one, the one around Beth Botsford's neck in Atlanta Monday night as she beamed atop the highest platform at the Olympics for all the world to see."I couldn't even believe it was Beth," marveled Lurz. "Fifteen-year-old Beth!"The friends of the 15-year-old Timonium girl -- who won the gold with her best-ever time of 1.01.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1996
Beth Botsford showed what being an Olympic athlete is all about yesterday.In sizzling afternoon heat, the 15-year-old Timonium swimmer, who won two gold medals at the Atlanta Games, cheerfully signed autographs for hundreds of children eager to meet their hero."
SPORTS
By Nathan Max and Nathan Max,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2002
Upon entering high school, Notre Dame Prep swimmer Bridget Kimmel already had won enough. At age 14, having swum competitively at a high level for six years, she was burned out and quit. "I was so sick of swimming," Kimmel, now a junior, said. "Basically, I hated it. At first I thought I was going to quit for good. The first few months I thought, `This is great, I'm never going back.' " Kimmel, 17, gave up competitive swimming for 15 months - from July 1999 to October 2000. But during that layoff she realized something: She needed the sport.
NEWS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
Michael Phelps said he felt "iffy" as he warmed up for the final of the 200-meter butterfly at the World Swimming Championships. The 16-year-old from Rodgers Forge was a bit more assured after he dived into the Marine Messe pool in Fukuoka, Japan, yesterday and polished his luster as one of the sport's hottest young stars. Seeded third in the final after a so-so swim in Monday's semifinals, Phelps shunned his traditional slow start, took the lead in the first 50 meters and never slowed.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - If Beth Botsford makes another Olympic swim team tomorrow night, she'll be ecstatic. If she doesn't, she'll still be a happy sophomore at the University of Arizona, a teen-ager whose idea of an escape is a long Sunday drive into the Santa Catalina Mountains in search of a good piece of pie. "I'm a sucker for the sun," Botsford said. "It's never cold in Tucson; it never rains. I could live out there and be a happy girl all my life. This is the most fun I've had in years."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff | July 27, 1997
Back and forth, Beth Botsford churns from one end of the pool to the other. She and her teammates form a drill team ofexquisitely precise fish. It's lulling, almost hypnotic, to watch them cut through the water as one, seemingly guided by an underwater metronome. For two straight hours, the water is their entire world: They swim slow to warm up. They swim fast to build speed. They swim long for endurance. They swim gently to cool down.It is, to state the obvious, a lot of swimming, especially when you consider how very little of it the public ultimately sees: One minute, 1.19 seconds, for example, in the case of Beth Botsford's gold medal performance in the 100-meter backstroke last July.
FEATURES
May 10, 1997
Today:Hot-Air Balloon Competition (6: 30 a.m.-8 a.m.): Balloon competition and liftoff from Druid Hill Park (Exit 7 off I-83 near the Baltimore Zoo). Free.FILA 5K Preakness Run (post time: 8 a.m.): The fourth-annual event starts at Rash Field in the Inner Harbor. Call 410-377-8882 for a race application. Entry fees $15 in advance and $20 on race day.The Baltimore Sun Preakness Parade (10 a.m.-noon): This year's lineup includes U.S. Olympic gold medalists Dominique Dawes (gymnastics) and Beth Botsford (swimming)
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1996
Beth Botsford showed what being an Olympic athlete is all about yesterday.In sizzling afternoon heat, the 15-year-old Timonium swimmer, who won two gold medals at the Atlanta Games, cheerfully signed autographs for hundreds of children eager to meet their hero."
FEATURES
May 10, 1997
Today:Hot-Air Balloon Competition (6: 30 a.m.-8 a.m.): Balloon competition and liftoff from Druid Hill Park (Exit 7 off I-83 near the Baltimore Zoo). Free.FILA 5K Preakness Run (post time: 8 a.m.): The fourth-annual event starts at Rash Field in the Inner Harbor. Call 410-377-8882 for a race application. Entry fees $15 in advance and $20 on race day.The Baltimore Sun Preakness Parade (10 a.m.-noon): This year's lineup includes U.S. Olympic gold medalists Dominique Dawes (gymnastics) and Beth Botsford (swimming)
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK and PETER SCHMUCK,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS - The U.S. Olympic swim trials are over, but the real work has just begun. The United States used to dominate this sport, but the U.S. team will have to get a lot better over the next 4 1/2 months to be a major force at the centennial Olympiad in Atlanta.Through seven days of competition at the Indiana University Natatorium, not one American record was broken the first such shutout since 1920 and another troubling reminder that the center lanes are no longer strictly U.S. territory.
SPORTS
By SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
North Baltimore Aquatic Club teammates and friends of Beth Botsford turned out more than 100 strong at BWI Airport last night to welcome home the Olympic swimming champion.The Garrison Forest School sophomore was greeted by balloons and signs proclaiming, "We Love You, Beth" and "Congratulations, Beth Botsford, Gold Medal(s) Winner." The "s" was inserted after she won her second gold."The week was exciting and fun, like nothing I had ever done before," said Botsford, who won the 100-meter backstroke and swam the leadoff backstroke leg in the 400 medley relay.
NEWS
July 26, 1996
CONGRATULATIONS are in order for Timonium's Beth Botsford, who this week put two gold medals around her neck and put her hometown and swim club on the map. The NTC 15-year-old swimmer, with a yen for Sesame Street puppets, became the first American woman to win gold in an Olympiad noted for its abundance of female talent.She was first in the 100-meter backstroke Monday and led the victorious 4x100 medley relay team Wednesday at the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center. Alas, she failed to qualify yesterday for the finals in what was deemed her most promising event, the 200-meter backstroke.
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