Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBeta
IN THE NEWS

Beta

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 27, 2006
For countless high-tech vets and newbies who are eager to get their paws on Monday's haul of gadgets, this week kicks off the season of the glitch. In truth, it is a season that knows no demarcations on the calendar and has no natural cycle, although it experiences a burst of momentum - usually demonstrated by the pulling of hair and muttering of profanities - every late December. And it is the only time of year that adds a fourth query to mankind's enduring search for cosmic answers: What are we?
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
September 28, 2011
Washington College announced that Andrea Clarke was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honor society for outstanding academic achievement in her freshman year. The daughter of Catonsville residents Marty Clarke and Ann Daniells carries a double major in English and drama. Clarke writes and edits the college's newspaper besides belonging to the Christian Campus Fellowship, the Cross Country Club and the Presidential Fellow Program. She is also involved with Relay for Life and the drama department productions.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
Beta Kaessmann Manakee, 95, author of the standard textbook used to teach Maryland history to elementary school students, died Dec. 19 at Church Home and Hospital, where she resided at the time of her death.Her work -- "My Maryland, Her First 300 Years" -- was published in 1934 by Ginn & Co. and remains in print. She was assisted in the writing by her husband, local historian Harold Manakee, and the late Joseph Wheeler, longtime director of the Enoch Pratt Free Library.She also helped research the 1931 literary and historical map of Maryland drawn by artist Edwin Tunis.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,New York Times News Service | February 11, 2007
Ever wonder why, when you skip your morning shower, you can't seem to get going, can't shake the sluggishness that stalks you from your sleep? Ever had a creative thought while the water cascades down your back? It's not happenstance that a morning shower energizes you, promotes insightful thinking and makes your skin tingle. "Being in warm water is a very pleasurable experience, and pleasure is mood-elevating," says Philip Rainer, who works at Karner Psychological Associates in Guilderland, N.Y., and has been a therapist for 23 years, often dealing with matters of mood, pleasure, relaxation and creativity.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | August 11, 1997
BETA, ANYONE? I do not review "beta test" products. I keep those unfinished versions of hardware and software as far from my computer as possible for fear their bugs might somehow infest it from a distance.There are so many problems with computer products that have officially been released that it is hard to imagine that any sane human would mess with stuff that manufacturers deem too gnarly for the corporate seal of approval.But in the past couple of years, the Internet has radically changed the world of software.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and By Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
A class of highly effective heart drugs called beta-blockers have developed a reputation for causing depression, impotence and fatigue. But a new study has found that the drugs' reputed side effects have been overblown. The study of 15 trials involving 35,000 patients was conducted by researchers trying to understand why so many physicians are reluctant to prescribe beta-blockers, even though they lower blood pressure, improve heart function and survival in patients with heart failure, and reduce deaths after heart attacks by 20 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2000
The old saying, "Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it," may be on the minds of many Mac users these days. They're dipping their toes into the beta version of Apple's next-generation operating system, Mac OS X (X being the Roman numeral for 10), and it's not familiar territory. Veteran Mac users have waited since the mid-1990s for an up-to-date successor to the core software that makes a Macintosh function the way it does, just as Microsoft's Windows underlies Intel-based computers.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,New York Times News Service | February 11, 2007
Ever wonder why, when you skip your morning shower, you can't seem to get going, can't shake the sluggishness that stalks you from your sleep? Ever had a creative thought while the water cascades down your back? It's not happenstance that a morning shower energizes you, promotes insightful thinking and makes your skin tingle. "Being in warm water is a very pleasurable experience, and pleasure is mood-elevating," says Philip Rainer, who works at Karner Psychological Associates in Guilderland, N.Y., and has been a therapist for 23 years, often dealing with matters of mood, pleasure, relaxation and creativity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2005
Address: maps.google.com What's the point?: Google has launched a beta version of a map service, ostensibly to compete with Mapquest and Yahoo maps. What to look for?: The big selling point (or security issue, depending on your perspective) is apparent when you click on the "Satellite" button -- type in many addresses, and you can see an aerial photograph of the area. It's not available for all areas, but it is for many, particularly in the Baltimore-Washington area, though some of the images are a couple of years old.
BUSINESS
By PETER LEWIS | February 5, 1996
FOR MANY PEOPLE, Netscape is synonymous with the Internet. The Netscape Communications Corp., whose corporate symbol is a fire-breathing monster nicknamed Mozilla, makes the Netscape Navigator software used by millions of people to operate and browse the Internet's popular World Wide Web.But fans of Japanese science fiction films will recall that Mozilla's role model, Godzilla, had some tough fights. Sure enough, a titanic struggle looms between Mozilla and its genetically altered twin: Microsoftra, better known as Microsoft Internet Explorer.
NEWS
December 27, 2006
For countless high-tech vets and newbies who are eager to get their paws on Monday's haul of gadgets, this week kicks off the season of the glitch. In truth, it is a season that knows no demarcations on the calendar and has no natural cycle, although it experiences a burst of momentum - usually demonstrated by the pulling of hair and muttering of profanities - every late December. And it is the only time of year that adds a fourth query to mankind's enduring search for cosmic answers: What are we?
BUSINESS
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2006
Tyson J. Carter slept through a hailstorm as he camped outside a Target store to nab a PlayStation 3 last month. But the deluge of woe began when he got Sony Corp.'s $600 video game console home. The system crashed repeatedly when the 19-year-old tried to adjust the music settings. Others complain that some games from earlier generations of the console did not run properly. And the high-definition picture promised by the PS3 doesn't work on some older televisions. "I'm not surprised," said Carter, a student of multimedia design who lives in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine say they have solved a mystery that has intrigued cardiologists for years: why one of the most commonly prescribed heart medications doesn't always work. The effectiveness of beta blockers - a class of drugs given to many of the estimated 5 million patients with chronic heart failure - depends on the genetic makeup of receptors in the heart, said Dr. Stephen B. Liggett, head of the school's cardiopulmonary genomics program and lead author of the beta blockers study.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 26, 2005
I've read about a pill to combat "stage fright" symptoms in public speaking or similar situations. It is called "propol-something" and is taken before the event. Do you know what it is and if it works? You are probably referring to a medication called propranolol (Inderal). This beta blocker is prescribed for problems from high blood pressure and irregular heart rhythms to angina and migraine prevention. Propranolol and other beta blockers are used clandestinely by many musicians to control stage fright, but the Food and Drug Administration has never approved these drugs for this purpose.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2005
Address: maps.google.com What's the point?: Google has launched a beta version of a map service, ostensibly to compete with Mapquest and Yahoo maps. What to look for?: The big selling point (or security issue, depending on your perspective) is apparent when you click on the "Satellite" button -- type in many addresses, and you can see an aerial photograph of the area. It's not available for all areas, but it is for many, particularly in the Baltimore-Washington area, though some of the images are a couple of years old.
NEWS
By Thomas M. Maugh and Thomas M. Maugh,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 2004
Heart disease is the bane of diabetics. Fully 80 percent of diabetics die of cardiovascular disease, and efforts to lower the risk by reducing blood pressure, lowering cholesterol and eliminating other risk factors have had minimal success. About 7 percent of diabetics are able to bring cardiac risk factors to desired levels. One big problem is that drugs that lower blood pressure can be counterproductive, exacerbating diabetes as they reduce hypertension. The key class of drugs known as beta blockers, for example, has repeatedly been demonstrated to be more effective at lowering blood pressure in diabetics than in those without the disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
Dangerous abnormalities in heart rhythm are more likely to occur on Mondays and Fridays than on other days of the week, scientists have concluded from a study of patients being treated for heart disease.The study did not explain the pattern, but because the abnormal heartbeats peaked at the beginning and end of the workweek, researchers suggested that stress and fatigue might have played a role.The findings mirrored those already reported for heart attacks and heart-related deaths, which are also more common on Mondays and in the morning.
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1991, Werner Renberg | August 4, 1991
If you're the type who checked whether the latest gross national product increase was adjusted for inflation, you probably would also appreciate risk-adjusted rates of return for your mutual funds.But even if you let others worry about how GNP figures are calculated, you ought to have a grasp of the concept of "risk-adjusted return."The knowledge could help you to manage your mutual fund investments better.You're aware that a fund's total return -- the most important measure of performance -- reflects the change in its share price during a given period, plus reinvested income and capital gains.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Philpot and Robert Philpot,New York Times News Service | January 26, 2003
Here's a recurring nightmare: The United States is taken over by an invading force. But it's not extraterrestrials or terrorists. It's celebrities. And it's happening already. You know it's happening because some guy named Jared is famous for losing 240 pounds by eating nothing but one brand of fast food. Because Carrot Top and Andrew "Dice" Clay are still landing gigs. Because of the slew of reality series, that are using celebrities instead of normal, everyday backstabbing whack jobs.
FEATURES
By Liz Stevens and Liz Stevens,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 17, 2002
Reporter: You might have heard. Betamax finally bit the dust. Reader: Betamax, the video format? You must be kidding? I thought Betamax packed it in eons ago, along with Rubik's Cube and Billy Idol. Reporter: Wrong! At the end of August, Sony announced that it would discontinue production of Betamax VCR players, after making them for 27 years. Not that the company was churning 'em out. It only made 2,800 units in 2001, and those were all for the Japanese market. Reader: And this merits a newspaper story because ...?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.