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Bessie Smith

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NEWS
June 11, 2006
On Friday, June 9, 2006, BESSIE SMITH (nee Rodner) beloved wife of the late Bernard Smith, loving mother of Norman L. Smith of Conn. and Orin S. Smith of Owings Mills, MD, devoted mother-in-law of Patricia S. Smith and Linda Smith, beloved sister of the late Abraham and Samuel Rodner; devoted sister-in-law of Harold and Evelyn Smith, Ethel and Stanley Potts and Fannny Diamond. Loving grandmother of Jason and Stephanie, Lydia Smith and Alexander Smith. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Sunday, June 11 at 8 A.M. Interment Beth Tfiloh Congregation Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Rd. Please omit flowers.
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NEWS
June 11, 2006
On Friday, June 9, 2006, BESSIE SMITH (nee Rodner) beloved wife of the late Bernard Smith, loving mother of Norman L. Smith of Conn. and Orin S. Smith of Owings Mills, MD, devoted mother-in-law of Patricia S. Smith and Linda Smith, beloved sister of the late Abraham and Samuel Rodner; devoted sister-in-law of Harold and Evelyn Smith, Ethel and Stanley Potts and Fannny Diamond. Loving grandmother of Jason and Stephanie, Lydia Smith and Alexander Smith. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Sunday, June 11 at 8 A.M. Interment Beth Tfiloh Congregation Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Rd. Please omit flowers.
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NEWS
By Janita Poe and Janita Poe,Chicago Tribune | January 5, 1993
CHICAGO -- Valerie Wellington, 33, known for her feisty renditions of "Million Dollar Secret," "Let the Good Times Roll" and "Sweet Home, Chicago," died Saturday of an aneurysm at Loyola University in Maywood, Ill.She was a latecomer to blues music, but Ms. Wellington -- through her stomp-and-shout nightclub performances, stage portrayals of blues greats like Bessie Smith and raucous romp through a popular Chicago Tribune commercial -- played a key role...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 25, 2000
After an Artscape weekend chockablock with exhibits of hectic postmodern eclecticism, the "Summer 2000" show at C. Grimaldis Gallery seems to have been assembled with an almost classical sense of calm and order. Grimaldis' summer show is traditionally a group exhibition devoted to the artists represented by the gallery, so there are many familiar names on view: painters Grace Hartigan, Eugene Leake, Raoul Middleman and Karl Connolly; sculptors Jon Isherwood and John Ruppert; and photographers Neil Meyerhoff, Alberto Korda, James Dusel and Christopher Myers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 27, 1991
From the moment you hear Vanessa Stewart's big, rich, emotion-packed voice in Arena Player's production of the revue, "Blues in the Night," you want to hear her cut loose in a rip-roaring solo. And it's worth the wait when she launches into Bessie Smith's "Dirty No-Gooder's Blues" in the second act.Lanky Ms. Stewart has a way of communing with the audience; she shares a song as if she's sharing a secret, leaning into the music and letting the choreography communicate almost as much as her expansive voice.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
In "Big Star Fallin' Mama: Five Women in Black Music," author Hettie Jones does more than profile Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Mahalia Jackson, Billie Holiday and Aretha Franklin.Through the stories of these five lives courses the history of African-Americans from the early 1900s to the 1980s, from minstrel shows to Motown soul, from the "race" records of the roaring '20s to the mostly segregated "R&B" category of today.Why read about music when so many other, supposedly more serious, subjects could be explored during Black History Month?
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 25, 2000
After an Artscape weekend chockablock with exhibits of hectic postmodern eclecticism, the "Summer 2000" show at C. Grimaldis Gallery seems to have been assembled with an almost classical sense of calm and order. Grimaldis' summer show is traditionally a group exhibition devoted to the artists represented by the gallery, so there are many familiar names on view: painters Grace Hartigan, Eugene Leake, Raoul Middleman and Karl Connolly; sculptors Jon Isherwood and John Ruppert; and photographers Neil Meyerhoff, Alberto Korda, James Dusel and Christopher Myers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Hoffman and Larry Hoffman,Special to The Sun | October 28, 1994
Koko Taylor, the reigning two-fisted Queen of the Blues, is used to a man's world.As a youngster, she cut her teeth on the rough-hewn recorded vocals of Howlin' Wolf and the poetic machismo of Sonny Boy Williamson. As a teen-ager she growled the blues in the tough joints of Chicago's rough-and-tumble South Side. Later, she understudied two he-men of the blues -- Willie Dixon and Muddy Waters.Female role models, such as Bessie Smith and Big Mama Thornton, were on the tough side themselves -- and scarce.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
On Sunday, February 20, 2005, M. LINUS DUERLING, loving husband of Helen J. Duerling, beloved father of Craig L. Duerling and his wife Nan, brother of George Duerling, Andrew Duerling, Jr., Doris Subock and Catherine Bohanan. He was preceded in death by his sister Mary Bessie Smith and his brother John Henry Duerling. A service celebrating his life will be held on Sunday, February 27 at 3 P.M. at Baldwin Memorial United Methodist Church, 921 Generals Highway, Millersville, MD. 21108. Memorial contributions may be made to the chuch.
NEWS
April 8, 1998
SHE MADE emotions and a woman's outlook dominant in country music. Her ability to sing while on the verge of tears brought to that genre what had previously been found in African-American blues and a few opera singers.One of the enduring stars of country music, Tammy Wynette was made famous outside its circles by an inept reference from Hillary Rodham Clinton.Ms. Wynette rose from poverty and knew pain in private life as a Billie Holiday or Bessie Smith or Maria Callas did.Her death from an apparent blood clot at 55 deprives millions of Americans of a voice that conveyed the human condition with clarity and had more songs to sing.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
In "Big Star Fallin' Mama: Five Women in Black Music," author Hettie Jones does more than profile Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Mahalia Jackson, Billie Holiday and Aretha Franklin.Through the stories of these five lives courses the history of African-Americans from the early 1900s to the 1980s, from minstrel shows to Motown soul, from the "race" records of the roaring '20s to the mostly segregated "R&B" category of today.Why read about music when so many other, supposedly more serious, subjects could be explored during Black History Month?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Hoffman and Larry Hoffman,Special to The Sun | October 28, 1994
Koko Taylor, the reigning two-fisted Queen of the Blues, is used to a man's world.As a youngster, she cut her teeth on the rough-hewn recorded vocals of Howlin' Wolf and the poetic machismo of Sonny Boy Williamson. As a teen-ager she growled the blues in the tough joints of Chicago's rough-and-tumble South Side. Later, she understudied two he-men of the blues -- Willie Dixon and Muddy Waters.Female role models, such as Bessie Smith and Big Mama Thornton, were on the tough side themselves -- and scarce.
NEWS
By Janita Poe and Janita Poe,Chicago Tribune | January 5, 1993
CHICAGO -- Valerie Wellington, 33, known for her feisty renditions of "Million Dollar Secret," "Let the Good Times Roll" and "Sweet Home, Chicago," died Saturday of an aneurysm at Loyola University in Maywood, Ill.She was a latecomer to blues music, but Ms. Wellington -- through her stomp-and-shout nightclub performances, stage portrayals of blues greats like Bessie Smith and raucous romp through a popular Chicago Tribune commercial -- played a key role...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 27, 1991
From the moment you hear Vanessa Stewart's big, rich, emotion-packed voice in Arena Player's production of the revue, "Blues in the Night," you want to hear her cut loose in a rip-roaring solo. And it's worth the wait when she launches into Bessie Smith's "Dirty No-Gooder's Blues" in the second act.Lanky Ms. Stewart has a way of communing with the audience; she shares a song as if she's sharing a secret, leaning into the music and letting the choreography communicate almost as much as her expansive voice.
NEWS
May 11, 2007
On May 3, 2007, PASTOR CHILEAN McCOY SMITH, JR.; survived by his wife, Michelle G.; sons, Joshua E. and Jordan E.; daughter, Ashlyne N. Jones; parents, Elder Chilean, Sr. and Evangelist Bessie D. Smith; brother, Chandler E. and a host of other family and friends. Friends may call the WYLIE FUNERAL HOME P.A. OF BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road. Friday, Pastor Smith will lie in state at Sweet Hope Freewill Baptist Church, 3925 Dolfield Avenue, from 5 to 8 P.M. In conjunction to the public viewing, a musical celebration will be held from 6:30 to 8 P.M. Funeral Services held Saturday at Israel Baptist Church, 1220 N. Chester Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ARIANE SZU-TU | July 3, 2008
Go West The Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks brings a touch of the West to Baltimore. As part of its Wednesday Lunch and Leisure series, the department hosts a Western hoedown. Bring food and listen to a live band play country music. There will be dancing and free giveaways. The hoedown is noon-1 p.m. Wednesday at War Memorial Plaza, 100 N. Holliday St. Call 410-396-7900 or go to baltimorecity.gov. Free First Friday comes early Because of Fourth of July events, this week's First Friday outdoor festival in Bel Air will be held today.
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