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Bert Vogelstein

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By Douglas M. Birch and Jonathan Bor and Douglas M. Birch and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
In a renovated supermarket on Orleans Street, to the blare of alternative rock music, Bert Vogelstein and a score of the world's smartest young scientists are searching for the genes that can program us for death.They put in grueling days and nights studying human colon cancer cells. They've published more than a thousand scientific papers. They've made signal discoveries -- including the identification, announced Monday, of an inherited genetic defect carried by some American Jews that doubles their risk of developing a common form of colon cancer.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Many people have heard of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg or Google co-founder Sergey Brin. But few know about Bert Vogelstein, a Johns Hopkins scientist who helped map the cancer genome and created gene and stool tests to detect colon cancer. A new, international award, similar to the Nobel Prize, but with a bigger payout of $3 million, aims to change that. On Wednesday, Zuckerberg and Brin joined Russian entrepreneur and venture capitalist Yuri Milner and Anne Wojcicki, founder of genetic testing company 23andMe, to launch the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Many people have heard of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg or Google co-founder Sergey Brin. But few know about Bert Vogelstein, a Johns Hopkins scientist who helped map the cancer genome and created gene and stool tests to detect colon cancer. A new, international award, similar to the Nobel Prize, but with a bigger payout of $3 million, aims to change that. On Wednesday, Zuckerberg and Brin joined Russian entrepreneur and venture capitalist Yuri Milner and Anne Wojcicki, founder of genetic testing company 23andMe, to launch the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1997
As the crowd gathered in the community room of the Weinberg House in Pikesville for the show yesterday, some wondered who the performers would be.The flier, "Claire Vogelstein Productions presents Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," did little to shed light on the question."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1997
As the crowd gathered in the community room of the Weinberg House in Pikesville for the show yesterday, some wondered who the performers would be.The flier, "Claire Vogelstein Productions presents Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," did little to shed light on the question."
NEWS
September 5, 1995
The Ride For Kids fund-raiser will begin at 8 a.m. Sept. 17 at The Mall in Columbia.The event will feature a caravan of hundreds of motorcycles along Maryland roads in a ride-a-thon designed to raise funds for childhood brain tumor research.Registration and the caravan departure will be from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. at The Mall in Columbia. The awards and check presentation will be from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Carroll County Agricultural Center in Westminster.The ceremony will feature such guest speakers as Dr. Bert Vogelstein of the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center and Mike Traynor, the founder of the Ride For Kids; interviews with patients and families; and the awarding of a Honda motorcycle.
NEWS
By New York Times | April 23, 1991
Scientists are finding that at the core of nearly every type of tumor cell, whatever the organ of origin, lies the same terrible flaw.The flaw afflicts a single gene in the cell, a gene that goes by the humdrum name of p53. So nearly universal is the defect in human tumors that scientists are beginning to suspect that it could be an almost indispensable step in cancerous transformation.Other genes clearly are mutated in any given cancer. But while some mutations vary from one class of tumor to the next, a blow to the p53 gene could be a common denominator to nearly every malignancy, particularly the most prevalent and deadliest adult tumors.
NEWS
August 28, 1997
THE DISCOVERY by Johns Hopkins researchers of a genetic mutation that doubles the risk of colorectal cancer illustrates the serendipity of science. At its best, scientific research meets exacting standards while remaining open to unanticipated discoveries, and to the seemingly unimportant clues that when examined more closely lead to dramatic breakthroughs.When Dr. Bert Vogelstein agreed to test a cancer patient who visited his Hopkins lab for genetic mutation that causes colon cancer, he never expected the favor to lead to a landmark discovery.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 5, 1993
There will be a "Motorcycle Ride-A-Thon" to raise money for research on childhood brain tumors at 10 a.m. Sept. 12, starting at the Mall in Columbia in Howard County. Registration begins at 7 a.m.The ride will begin in Columbia and end at the fairgrounds in Frederick.The convoy, expected to have scores of motorcycles, will be escorted by police along Route 29 to Route 216, Route 108 to Route 32, then on Interstate 70 into Frederick.Its estimated time of arrival in Carroll County, in the Mount Airy area, will be around 10:30 a.m.Now entering its 10th year, the national Ride For Kids program was started by Atlanta native Mike Traynor.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1999
A 29-year-old cancer researcher at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center has won a prestigious science prize for a new method of identifying active genes in cancer cells.Victor Velculescu, a postdoctoral student in the lab of Hopkins oncologist Bert Vogelstein, developed the method for his thesis in 1998, and has watched it quickly become implemented by scientists worldwide.The $25,000 award was announced Thursday by Science magazine.Velculescu said the idea arose from the inadequacy of existing methods to see genetic patterns inside cancer cells.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Jonathan Bor and Douglas M. Birch and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
In a renovated supermarket on Orleans Street, to the blare of alternative rock music, Bert Vogelstein and a score of the world's smartest young scientists are searching for the genes that can program us for death.They put in grueling days and nights studying human colon cancer cells. They've published more than a thousand scientific papers. They've made signal discoveries -- including the identification, announced Monday, of an inherited genetic defect carried by some American Jews that doubles their risk of developing a common form of colon cancer.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 15, 1991
A multinational group of researchers headed by a Johns Hopkins oncology professor has discovered a gene that plays a key role in the development of colon cancer, opening the way for tests to identify high-risk individuals and for early detection of the disease.The discovery, being reported in today's edition of the journal Science, may also lead to the development of new therapies for colon cancer, which is the second most common form of cancer in the United States. Last year, it struck 155,000 people and killed 61,000.
NEWS
By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,New York Times News Service | May 3, 1991
Scientists have taken the first step toward developing a method for detecting certain kinds of cancer simply by analyzing the cells that are shed daily in bodily fluids.They have shown that with a standard test, they can pick out a few aberrant genes indicative of cancer from among a large number of mostly normal cells.The finding is expected to lead to a simple new type of cancer test that could find cancers early enough to treat or cure them.It is the outgrowth of a decade of accumulating progress in understanding the molecular biology of cancer cells.
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