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NEWS
December 26, 2007
On December 21, 2007 HENRY BERT, JR.; beloved husband of Mollie E. Bert. On Friday, friends may call at VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Rd., from 3 to 8 P.M. On Saturday, Mr. Bert will lie instate at Christian Life Church, 6605 Liberty Rd., where the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 655-0015.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 14, 2014
Rose Brier became a stakes winner for the first time when he captured the $60,000 Bert Allen Stakes, the sixth in a series of Virginia-bred races contested at Laurel Park on Saturday because of the shuttering of Colonial Downs this summer. Rose Brier, a Mizzen Mast offspring trained by Jane Cibelli and ridden by Trevor McCarthy, paid $5.20 as the favorite in the 11/16-mile test over firm turf. The 5-year-old beat second choice Hard Enough by 31/4 lengths, with Dannhauser finishing a nose back in third.
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NEWS
October 10, 2004
On October 5, 2004, DEBBIE K. BERT. Devoted daughter of Sallie A. Bert and loving mother of Kandice Moore. She also leaves to mourn two brothers, Larry and Craig Bert, one grand-daughter and host of other loving relatives and friends. On today, friends may call at VAUGHN C. GREENE Funeral Services (EAST), 4905 York Road, where the family will receive friends from 4 to 8 P.M. On Monday, Mrs. Bert will lie in-state at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Chapel, 4905 York Road, where the family will receive friends from 11 to 11:30 A.M. with Services to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karmen Fox and For The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
“What do you do around here, Don?” That's the question on everyone's mind, even Don's. Four weeks into his whimper of a return to SC&P, he remains in career limbo, cooped up in a mausoleum of an office his without so much as an ad campaign to his name. Relapse was inevitable, which means repetition was unavoidable. In last week's episode, "Field Trip," we saw Don swallow his pride and accept his old job on SC&P's conditions, not his. It was a new leaf for the entitled and narcissistic anti-hero we love to hate.
NEWS
April 27, 2002
David R. Bert, a World War II veteran and longtime insurance manager and Lutherville resident, died Monday of heart and kidney disease at Oakcrest Village Care Center. He was 86. Born in New York City, he grew up in northern New Jersey, where he met Virginia Goossens. They married in 1944, when she took a train to meet him at his army base in Great Bend, Kan. Soon afterward, he was sent to the Pacific Theater with the 1915th Engineering Aviation Battalion and spent a year in Okinawa. The battalion was preparing to invade Japan when the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending the war. "They were all so thankful at the time that they would not be heading for Japan," his wife said.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Now that the Defense of Marriage Act is out of the way, we have time to focus on real issues: puppet sex. A portion of the Internet lost its mind this morning over next week's New Yorker cover (pictured above). Featuring Sesame Street puppets Bert and Ernie snuggling and watching the Supreme Court on television, it's a clear nod to the court's decisions on DOMA and Proposition 8. Fine. Cute, even . Except it launched a full-fledged debate over whether Bert and Ernie are actually gay (they're not)
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 7, 1997
BERT, ERNIE'S roommate on "Sesame Street," is not dead. He isn't even ill.Bert is healthy and he is going to stay healthy. Got that?Because after you are done reading this, all you are likely to remember is that you read in the newspaper something about Bert dying, and that's what you will say to a friend, and the kids will overhear you and go to school and tell their friends that "Sesame Street" is going to kill off Bert, and, hang on, because we will...
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | November 7, 1994
Melanie Durantaye uses a "talking" mannequin to sell Australian oilskin coats. Nancy and Barry Gibson have set up a mechanical bubble-blowing bear dressed in a pink tutu to make their shop stand out.For Main Street merchants in Historic Ellicott City, nothing much DTC is too much if it helps bring customers into the store."
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | September 1, 1991
On some big-city newspapers, the "cub" reporters -- the rookies -- start out doing obituaries. The idea is that the so-called obits are good practice.A good obit is concise and packed with facts, containing the most important highlights of the deceased person's life.Thus, the cub reporter gets valuable practice at condensing information and at selecting and organizing material based on its relativevalue to the story. Those skills are extremely valuable to news writers.Obits also are considered good practice for developing objectivity.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | October 23, 1990
BERT FRIDLEY's friend, Freddie Posh, earns just under a half-million dollars a year. They've been friends since they were in grammar school, so they've always been able to speak frankly to one another."
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Now that the Defense of Marriage Act is out of the way, we have time to focus on real issues: puppet sex. A portion of the Internet lost its mind this morning over next week's New Yorker cover (pictured above). Featuring Sesame Street puppets Bert and Ernie snuggling and watching the Supreme Court on television, it's a clear nod to the court's decisions on DOMA and Proposition 8. Fine. Cute, even . Except it launched a full-fledged debate over whether Bert and Ernie are actually gay (they're not)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2012
Thirty-five years later, the triumph remains one for the ages. Behind by a mile, in a must-win game, the Colts stormed back to defeat New England and take the AFC East title. Trailing, 21-3 in the second half, Baltimore scored four touchdowns - the last on a 99-yard drive - to stun the Patriots, 30-24 in the last regular-season game and make the 1977 playoffs. "What a great comeback," recalled Bert Jones, the quarterback who threw three TD passes and then marched the team the length of the field for the victory.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
The Orioles don't play until tonight, but I figured I'd give you something baseball-related to read today. Bert Sugar, best known as a boxing historian, died Sunday from cardiac arrest. He was 75. Sugar is remembered for wearing his fedora, chomping on his cigar and churning out story after wonderful story about boxing. But Sugar was a baseball historian as well. He had a great perspective on the game. In 2005, I was charged with writing a piece about the 10th anniversary of Cal Ripken Jr. setting baseball's Iron Man record . My fantastic and ambitious sports editor at the time, Randy Harvey, challenged me to write a wide-sweeping article with historical perspective, something I'm not sure I had done before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Becky Quinn | October 7, 2011
Thursday night is b intern Becky Quinn's favorite night of the week for plenty of reasons (hello, Thirsty Thursday!). NBC and its comedy lineup just make it that much better. Rather than taking her time like her roommates to get ready to go out, she would rather sit in front of my TV from 8-10 p.m. and chuckle to herself. Here she picks this week's LOL moments: "Community": I only have one thing to say about this episode - Chang is not only married to the leg of a mannequin and living in a storage closet, but he is now also the head of security at Greendale.
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel, b | August 10, 2011
Will the rubber duckie be the best man? The are-they-or-aren't-they gay jokes about Ernie and Bert have a long history. I think an image of them holding hands was carved by early man in the caves at Lascaux. But could the two actually get married? Huffington Post reports today that more than 900 people have signed a petition urging the makers of "Sesame Street" get married. Lair Scott started the petition  which reads, in part, "In this horrific age of LGBT kids taking their own lives, they need to know that they ARE Beautiful and their lives are worth living.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Daisy Alverda "Bert" Booth, who was elected to the House of Delegates from Baltimore County and was known for her strong advocacy of civil rights, died July 2 of a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former Chestnut Ridge resident was 85. The daughter of a Catonsville pharmacist and a homemaker, Daisy Alverda Stagmer was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. Mrs. Booth, who family members said never used her first name, preferred to be known as Alverda "Bert" Booth.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
Watch out Madonna, Barry Bonds and Donald Trump. One day soon, Bert Droter may join you among the rich and famous.Who is Bert Droter?He and his brother and two sisters own the Angler's Restaurant on Kent Narrows in Queen Anne's County.Until last Saturday's el Gordo drawing, Mr. Droter, a former tool factory worker, lived a rather quiet life.But in the days since the drawing, Mr. Droter, 38, has managed to rocket himself to fame -- and possibly fortune -- by proclaiming himself the winner of the $10 million el Gordo jackpot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Impervious to cynicism and layered with critic-retardants, "Mary Poppins" has plopped into the Kennedy Center Opera House for a nice long stay that should keep the box office humming. The musical, a Disney/Cameron Mackintosh presentation that boasts the theatrical bells and whistles expected from those forces, might not fully satisfy folks devoted to, and expecting a copy of, the popular 1964 movie that inspired it. Devotees of the children's book series by P.L. Travers that started it all might find a nit or two to pick as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Impervious to cynicism and layered with critic-retardants, "Mary Poppins" has plopped into the Kennedy Center Opera House for a nice long stay that should keep the box office humming. The musical, a Disney/Cameron Mackintosh presentation that boasts the theatrical bells and whistles expected from those forces, might not fully satisfy folks devoted to, and expecting a copy of, the popular 1964 movie that inspired it. Devotees of the children's book series by P.L. Travers that started it all might find a nit or two to pick as well.
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