Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBerry Brazelton
IN THE NEWS

Berry Brazelton

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson and Randi Henderson,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 5, 1991
Washington--There's no mistaking the fact that pediatrician T. Berry Brazelton is a man who loves babies, loves them unashamedly and unself-consciously.Just watch the way he imitates a thumb-sucker, sticking his own thumb in his mouth, drawing in his cheeks, capturing the pleasure and satisfaction of one of childhood's most identifiable habits.Just look at him encircled by three toddlers, strangers to him, little ones who have been momentarily hijacked by a photographer because it seems only fitting that this famous baby doctor have his picture taken with babies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and By Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2005
In the 1800s, before many physicians specialized in treating children, mothers were doctors to their families. In the 1950s, a quarter-century after pediatricians formed their own professional organization, Dr. Benjamin Spock was the guru parents turned to for advice. But the modern pediatrician has heavy competition. Parents have sleep coaches and message boards and moms' groups, Supernanny and La Leche League. With a few computer keystrokes, they can look up when their toddler should be walking or take an online quiz to see if a kindergartner might have ADHD.
Advertisement
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | September 9, 2001
Son, 10, still wants to sleep with parent Q. My 10 1/2 -year-old son still needs me to sleep with him at night. He tells me he's afraid of robbers breaking into the house, even though we have a security system. He's very sensitive and worries about everything he hears on the news. He won't even ride his bike outside unless I'm out to watch him. What's your thinking on this? A. I think your son is too old for these fears and for this kind of dependency. At 4 and 5 this behavior was normal, but now it's not. Can you get him evaluated by a child psychiatrist or psychologist who can help him learn to separate from you and help you learn to let him become more self-confident?
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | September 9, 2001
Son, 10, still wants to sleep with parent Q. My 10 1/2 -year-old son still needs me to sleep with him at night. He tells me he's afraid of robbers breaking into the house, even though we have a security system. He's very sensitive and worries about everything he hears on the news. He won't even ride his bike outside unless I'm out to watch him. What's your thinking on this? A. I think your son is too old for these fears and for this kind of dependency. At 4 and 5 this behavior was normal, but now it's not. Can you get him evaluated by a child psychiatrist or psychologist who can help him learn to separate from you and help you learn to let him become more self-confident?
FEATURES
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | May 24, 1998
Q. My husband has a job opportunity that would require a two-year stay in Paris. We have two daughters, ages 9 and 4, and we're considering the move because it could be an exciting, educational opportunity for all of us.Our 4-year-old is flexible, but our 9-year-old is a sensitive, quiet, bright child who needs time to adjust to changes. She says she does not want to go.We feel that in the future she'll look back on the overseas experience as a wonderful memory. However, we don't want to traumatize her by taking this assignment.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | September 17, 2000
Q. I just read the letter from the father who is thinking about having another child before his daughter Karina's second birthday and was wondering if he should wait. When our first child was 11 months old, I became unexpectedly pregnant with his little brother. It was very difficult to have two babies in less than two years, but I can see God's perfect timing and wisdom now that the boys are 9 and 10 years old. They are good buddies, and each has a built-in playmate. The first year was the hardest, but now I am glad that we didn't "plan" our children and their spacing.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | December 19, 1999
Q. My 16-year-old son is a wonderful child who is in the gifted classes at high school. Although he is very intelligent, he is doing poorly in school.His teachers tell me that intelligent children often go through school without having to study much and when they reach a point where they do have to study, they aren't prepared for it and become frustrated.I talk to my son about this a lot, and he understands that his future is in jeopardy. He always promises to do better, and sometimes he does work hard and do better, but he always falls back.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | June 11, 2000
Q. What is your opinion of an 8-year-old boy who cannot say "I love you"? When I ask him why he cannot say the words, he replies that he really doesn't understand what they mean. I have tried to explain by giving examples of what love means, but he doesn't seem to understand. He seems to have difficulty expressing his feelings of like or dislike. When asked if he had a good time at a birthday party, he can't seem to give a definitive answer. If I try to talk to him about it, he gets upset.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | June 25, 2000
Q. My husband and I read your column on spanking. While we don't feel comfortable with the idea of spanking, we feel we need alternatives to timeouts, which is our current form of discipline. We have two sons: Fletcher, 3:, and Nicky, 2. Fletcher is very bright but is language-delayed and is in a program for language delay that seems to be helping him. Our principle method of discipline is timeouts in conjunction with frequent praise for desirable behavior. The timeouts do not seem to be working for Fletcher.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | March 12, 2000
Q. Would you address the issue of teachers policing pupils and looking for signs of what they think is child abuse? My daughter was reported to the Office of Children's Services after her daughter's teacher questioned her about looking sad one morning and she explained that she was bad and had been spanked. (The spanking left a small red mark on her hand and leg.) My daughter is a wonderful mother, completely devoted to this beautiful, strong-willed 6-year-old, and spanked her when all else failed.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, m.d. and T. Berry Brazelton, m.d.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | February 11, 2001
Q. My daughter, who is almost 2, is very attached to my husband. When she's sick, she wants her father. When she wants to be held, she wants her father. When she's being put to bed, she wants her father. I drop her off at day care in the morning, and Daddy is the one who picks her up and is home with her and my son (age 6) for about one hour before I get home. I used to be the one who put her to bed, which didn't go well. I asked my husband to start doing it because it seemed as though I was always doing the "bad" things (such as dropping her at day care)
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | September 17, 2000
Q. I just read the letter from the father who is thinking about having another child before his daughter Karina's second birthday and was wondering if he should wait. When our first child was 11 months old, I became unexpectedly pregnant with his little brother. It was very difficult to have two babies in less than two years, but I can see God's perfect timing and wisdom now that the boys are 9 and 10 years old. They are good buddies, and each has a built-in playmate. The first year was the hardest, but now I am glad that we didn't "plan" our children and their spacing.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | July 16, 2000
Q. I recently received a copy of your response to a letter regarding the transitioning of a child from his parents' bed to his own bed. You wrote: "Learning to sleep alone is an autonomy issue for the child and a separation issue for the parents." I'm not clear on what that means. Is it important for a child's independence to learn to sleep on his own by a certain age or developmental stage? My son, who is 3, has slept with my husband and me since birth. He has his own room with a bed, but he is uninterested in it. I don't think he should be forced to move to his own bed until he is ready, but many of my relatives are concerned that we are hurting his development in some way. I work outside the home, as does my husband, so we feel it is important to spend as much time as possible with our son, including at night.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | July 9, 2000
Q. My 22-month old daughter hits and bites me when I tell her no or ask her to do something. She also tries to bite the rug or whatever is near her. When she is trying to bite or hit, she growls like a dog. I have tried to stop her by telling her it is not nice and that it hurts. I have also used timeouts. These have not worked. Do you have any suggestions? A. Most toddlers go through phases of biting and hitting when they are frustrated or angry. The more you react, the more you may be reinforcing her behavior.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | June 25, 2000
Q. My husband and I read your column on spanking. While we don't feel comfortable with the idea of spanking, we feel we need alternatives to timeouts, which is our current form of discipline. We have two sons: Fletcher, 3:, and Nicky, 2. Fletcher is very bright but is language-delayed and is in a program for language delay that seems to be helping him. Our principle method of discipline is timeouts in conjunction with frequent praise for desirable behavior. The timeouts do not seem to be working for Fletcher.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | June 11, 2000
Q. What is your opinion of an 8-year-old boy who cannot say "I love you"? When I ask him why he cannot say the words, he replies that he really doesn't understand what they mean. I have tried to explain by giving examples of what love means, but he doesn't seem to understand. He seems to have difficulty expressing his feelings of like or dislike. When asked if he had a good time at a birthday party, he can't seem to give a definitive answer. If I try to talk to him about it, he gets upset.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | July 9, 2000
Q. My 22-month old daughter hits and bites me when I tell her no or ask her to do something. She also tries to bite the rug or whatever is near her. When she is trying to bite or hit, she growls like a dog. I have tried to stop her by telling her it is not nice and that it hurts. I have also used timeouts. These have not worked. Do you have any suggestions? A. Most toddlers go through phases of biting and hitting when they are frustrated or angry. The more you react, the more you may be reinforcing her behavior.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, m.d. and T. Berry Brazelton, m.d.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | February 11, 2001
Q. My daughter, who is almost 2, is very attached to my husband. When she's sick, she wants her father. When she wants to be held, she wants her father. When she's being put to bed, she wants her father. I drop her off at day care in the morning, and Daddy is the one who picks her up and is home with her and my son (age 6) for about one hour before I get home. I used to be the one who put her to bed, which didn't go well. I asked my husband to start doing it because it seemed as though I was always doing the "bad" things (such as dropping her at day care)
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, m.d. and T. Berry Brazelton, m.d.,new york times special features | March 26, 2000
Q. Our 18-month-old son has slept in his room in a crib since he was 6 months old. We are concerned because he always cries when waking up from a nap or a full night's sleep. We rarely find him lying awake in his crib, playing. He cries himself awake, or we find him standing in his crib -- crying. We have always answered his cries and gotten him up if it is time. Is this the only way he knows how to tell us he is awake? Is this normal behavior? We're worried because he is crying, not whining or whimpering.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | March 12, 2000
Q. Would you address the issue of teachers policing pupils and looking for signs of what they think is child abuse? My daughter was reported to the Office of Children's Services after her daughter's teacher questioned her about looking sad one morning and she explained that she was bad and had been spanked. (The spanking left a small red mark on her hand and leg.) My daughter is a wonderful mother, completely devoted to this beautiful, strong-willed 6-year-old, and spanked her when all else failed.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.