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February 3, 1991
Baltimore anti-war activist Philip F. Berrigan appeared i Pittsburgh last week to protest Operation Desert Storm and testify on behalf of a fellow protester.Mr. Berrigan, 67, testified Wednesday in the Allegheny County Common Pleas Court trial of Vincent Eirene, 38, of Pittsburgh, who was charged with assault after a courthouse scuffle last May 4. Deputy Leo Campbell was bitten when he tried to force protesters to take down placards.Mr. Berrigan, a former Josephite priest and member of the Plowshares Eight anti-war group, said outside the courthouse, "If peace comes, it will draw power away from a tiny nucleus of very powerful people in this country."
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NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | September 2, 2007
Adrianna Amari is a pianist, photographer, psychologist, peacenik and poet. Now, the faculty member with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has assembled a book of poetry by Daniel Berrigan, the longtime antiwar activist who was convicted of burning draft records in the celebrated "Catonsville Nine" case. She placed the highly evocative poems side-by-side with dozens of haunting photographs of cemeteries that she had taken during the decade before she lost her vision as a result of an aneurysm.
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NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | September 2, 1993
Longtime peace activist Philip F. Berrigan yesterday was sentenced to 30 days in jail for a protest at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in Columbia.Howard Circuit Judge Louis Becker found Mr. Berrigan, 69, guilty of trespassing at the Feb. 24 protest. Trespassing, a misdemeanor, carries a maximum sentence of 90 days in jail.The former Josephite priest from Baltimore is to begin his sentence Monday at the county Detention Center.Michele Naar-Obed, 37, of Baltimore also was given a 30-day sentence following her trespassing conviction by Judge Becker yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | May 31, 2007
There is something solemn, hushed and reverent about the eternally still figures that populate Adrianna Amari's luminous color photographs of Baltimore graveside statues, on view at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. The silent stone angels and saints, with their century-old patinas of moss and grime, seem to speak through eloquent gestures of a higher realm, where there is no more death, no more sorrow, only the clear light of truth that shines out from these extraordinary pictures.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
Police arrested seven peace activists, including Philip F. Berrigan, at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory yesterday during a demonstration in which ashes were spread on the grounds to symbolize destruction from nuclear weapons.The protesters, all members of the Baltimore Emergency Response Network (BERN), were arrested about 8 a.m. yesterday when 15 members blocked an employee gate at the 365-acre site in Columbia, police said. Besides trespassing to spread ashes on the sidewalks and grounds, police said, the protesters distributed and posted leaflets.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
Anti-war activist Philip Berrigan was back in federal court yesterday for violating his probation in the 1993 vandalism of an Air Force jet at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina.Outside the courtroom, Berrigan said he refused to wear an electronic monitoring device as part of his court-ordered home detention. He also refused to pay nearly $3,000 in fines.U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul M. Rosenberg released Berrigan on his own recognizance and said a hearing would be set later before another judge.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
About 25 cheering supporters were on hand at the county district courthouse Friday to welcome peace activist Philip Berrigan back to freedom and to criticize the judge who jailed him last week.The 68-year-old former Josephite priest had served one night in jail after a county judge handed him a five-year sentence Thursday for contempt of court.District Judge James N. Vaughan sentenced Berrigan after he refused to apologize for calling the judge's courtroom a "disgrace" and comparing it with Nazi Germany.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
Longtime Roman Catholic peace activist Philip Berrigan was sentenced to five years in prison for contempt of court yesterday because he wouldn't apologize for a remark he made to a Howard County District Court judge.Mr. Berrigan, 68, a former Josephite priest and a leader in the peace movement since the Vietnam War, had accompanied eight of his colleagues to the Ellicott City courthouse for their trial on charges of trespassing at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Columbia.Mr. Berrigan was immediately taken into custody and was being held at the Howard County Detention Center last night in Jessup.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
The 77-year-old peace activist Philip F. Berrigan was immediately shifted into solitary confinement at a federal penitentiary Sept. 11 when terrorists crashed hijacked airliners into the Pentagon and World Trade Center. Berrigan was among a number of "high-profile" inmates segregated from the general population in federal prisons across the nation, according to Internet messages received Wednesday at Jonah House, the Roman Catholic anti-war community that Berrigan helped found in Baltimore nearly 30 years ago. "Phil's in lockdown," said Elizabeth McAlister, Berrigan's wife, who is also a founder of Jonah House.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
In December 1999, in his last act of civil disobedience, Philip F. Berrigan banged hammers on warplanes at the Warfield Air National Guard Base in Baltimore County. He was arrested. Yesterday, his widow, 21-year-old daughter and a few dozen friends and other peace activists returned to the gates of that base in Middle River. Their purpose was to demonstrate support for three nuns, two of them from Baltimore, sentenced in Denver on Friday to prison terms of at least 2 1/2 years each for vandalizing a nuclear missile silo with hammers and painting a cross on it with their blood.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Philip Berrigan's grave sits inside an overgrown West Baltimore cemetery, giving inspiration to members of Jonah House who continue to protest war, violence and U.S. military spending from a house they built there. Eight years ago, Jonah House's war resisters, led by Berrigan and his wife, Elizabeth McAlister, became the official caretakers of St. Peter's graveyard, the final resting place of former parishioners of St. Peter the Apostle Roman Catholic Church, at Hollins and Poppleton streets.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
Amy Goodman joined the circle of mourners when Philip Berrigan died on Dec. 6 last year, surrounded by his family and friends at the Jonah House community of West Baltimore. Goodman's the fiercely independent host of Democracy Now!, the Pacifica radio and television war and peace report that styles itself "the exception to the rulers." She'd known and admired Berrigan since 1998 when she interviewed him in a federal prison where he was doing time for an anti-war assault on a Navy ship.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
In December 1999, in his last act of civil disobedience, Philip F. Berrigan banged hammers on warplanes at the Warfield Air National Guard Base in Baltimore County. He was arrested. Yesterday, his widow, 21-year-old daughter and a few dozen friends and other peace activists returned to the gates of that base in Middle River. Their purpose was to demonstrate support for three nuns, two of them from Baltimore, sentenced in Denver on Friday to prison terms of at least 2 1/2 years each for vandalizing a nuclear missile silo with hammers and painting a cross on it with their blood.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
Hundreds of protesters from across the region defied snow and steadily dropping temperatures in downtown Baltimore yesterday to march, sing and speak out against what they say could be "a devastating and disastrous war" against Iraq. At least 250 people filled the rectory at St. Vincent DePaul Church on Front Street yesterday afternoon, and organizers say twice that many or more had earlier marched from Camden Station to City Hall. "Look around," said the Rev. Richard Lawrence, pastor of the church.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Antiwar leader Philip Berrigan died of cancer last month, but his presence was keenly felt yesterday on a second day of weekend protests against possible war with Iraq. His picture was affixed to the parkas of several dozen Baltimore marchers. His widow, Elizabeth McAlister, addressed the several hundred demonstrators. And his 21-year-old daughter, Kate, was arrested after jumping a barrier in an act of civil disobedience that has become something of a family tradition. "It would give him a lot of hope to see people come out in weather [that is]
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 10, 2002
THE CONVERSATION goes back to St. Veronica's Church in Cherry Hill, the night that Philip Berrigan got himself arrested in Washington inside a so-called tiger cage. Berrigan wanted to show the suffering of caged prisoners in Vietnam. When the police showed up, they charged him with protesting without a permit. It was a terrible thing to do. When Berrigan went out to break the law, he didn't anticipate a piddling permit charge. He expected the worst that the law could throw at him, so he could run with it. I was at St. Veronica's that night with a couple of priests who knew Berrigan pretty well, the Rev. Richard Wagner and the Rev. Paul Banet.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2000
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge ignored a prosecutor's suggested guidelines and imposed stiff prison sentences yesterday on longtime peace activist Philip Berrigan and three co-defendants charged with malicious destruction of Maryland Air National Guard warplanes. "The amount of destruction in this case takes it out of the guidelines of the typical malicious destruction of property case," said Judge James T. Smith Jr. He sentenced Berrigan, 76, to 30 months in a Department of Corrections prison on charges of conspiring with the others to damage two A-10 Warthog aircraft at the Air National Guard base in Middle River and then carrying through on the action in the pre-dawn hours on Dec. 19, 1999.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Antiwar leader Philip Berrigan died of cancer last month, but his presence was keenly felt yesterday on a second day of weekend protests against possible war with Iraq. His picture was affixed to the parkas of several dozen Baltimore marchers. His widow, Elizabeth McAlister, addressed the several hundred demonstrators. And his 21-year-old daughter, Kate, was arrested after jumping a barrier in an act of civil disobedience that has become something of a family tradition. "It would give him a lot of hope to see people come out in weather [that is]
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2002
The mourners filled the street yesterday in West Baltimore because Philip Berrigan gave focus to the anti-war movement 40 years ago. They packed a black parish because Mr. Berrigan confronted racism and patriarchy and injustice long after the civil rights movement. They braved sub-freezing temperatures to say farewell to an artilleryman and infantry lieutenant turned Roman Catholic priest, remembered as a husband, father, peace activist and prisoner. "I didn't know him but I've been a longtime admirer of him so I came here out of respect," said Michael Redmond, 50, who drove from Philadelphia to join several hundred mourners.
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