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Bernard King

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NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | March 20, 1991
Before we get rolling with this week's dose of "Q's and A's," let mefirst remind everyone once again that the application deadline for the ninth-annual Anne Arundel County Sun All-County Academic-Athletic Team is Friday, March 29.All entries must be received in our office by 5 p.m. that day or postmarked by that evening. To date, we havereceived an overflow of outstanding applications.As for extending the deadline two weeks to March 29, I got an interesting opinion on the 24-hour Sportsline, 647-2499, from Northeast High counselor Len Sokoloff.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | March 12, 1993
Bowling's King of Hill match is a fitting stepladder crownThe Pro Bowlers Association Tour is making its yearly Maryland stop this week, and if that isn't cause for celebration, I don't know what is. In fact, we're doubly blessed, for the Fair Lanes Open brings with it pro bowling's new King of the Hill format.It's enough to make a guy want to sing (with apologies to the late Roger Miller):Every week we get to see,Pro bowling on ABC.Year after year the same,You even know those guys by name.
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NEWS
November 19, 1990
Because of incorrect information supplied by the Associated Press, a photograph of Haywoode Workman of the Washington Bullets was identified incorrectly as Bernard King in yesterday's editions.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | January 23, 1993
LANDOVER -- Bernard King may prove -- as he did in 1987 -- that he can recover from knee surgery after sitting out for more than an entire season. But for the members of the Washington Bullets, King's release Thursday was the best move for the rebuilding team.A team whose future is geared toward the development of younger players -- 10 of the 13 players on the roster have four or less years of NBA experience -- the Bullets decided to stick to their master plan by releasing King, 36.After the Bullets didn't reactivate him last week, King got into a shoving match with coach Wes Unseld during practice.
SPORTS
November 18, 1990
Because of incorrect information supplied by the Associated Press, a photograph of Haywoode Workman of the Washington Bullets was identified incorrectly as Bernard King in yesterday's editions.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | January 15, 1991
VS. PHOENIX SUNS* WHEN: Tonight, 9:30.* WHERE: Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum.* TV/RADIO: Ch. 20, WTOP-AM 1500.* OUTLOOK: The surprising Bullets (15-18), who have won eight of their last 11, open a four-game West Coast trip against the Suns (23-11). Bernard King has scored 35 or more points in seven of the last 11 games, topping 40 on four occasions. During the same stretch Harvey Grant has averaged 23.8 points per game. King is leading the NBA with a 31.2 average. Kevin Johnson paces the Suns with a 22.6 average, followed by Tom Chambers (21.3)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff Staff writer Ken Rosenthal contributed to this story | January 11, 1991
LANDOVER -- Bernard King loves performing the same moves over and over, seemingly daring someone to stop him.Last night, like every other night this season, no one could. But then this is a new Bernard King.He scores any time, any where, with a master's touch.Last night, he touched the stars, reaching the top of the NBA scoring charts, as his 45 points lifted his average above Michael Jordan's 30.8 per game.That performance, combined with a season-high 34 points from Harvey Grant, assured the Washington Bullets of a 122-110 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers and moved them into third place in the Atlantic Division.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 9, 1990
EMMITSBURG -- If and when Washington Bullets general manager John Nash determines whether John Williams and Ledell Eackles will be available this season, he could face another contract hassle with small forward Bernard King, probably the team's most productive player the past two seasons.King, 33, who becomes a free agent after this season, voiced disappointment yesterday that the Bullets have not made a serious effort to re-sign him."They've put me on the back burner, and I'm not pleased about it," he said.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | January 16, 1993
BOWIE -- Charles Grantham, president of the NBA Players Association, said yesterday that he will urge the league to take prompt action to determine Bernard King's status with the Washington Bullets.On Thursday, the Bullets suspended King for four days for "actions detrimental to the team" after a shoving and shouting match between King and coach Wes Unseld at practice on Monday. King will miss one game, so the suspension will cost him about $30,000."The Bullets cannot keep Bernard King in limbo," said Grantham.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | January 15, 1993
The tenuous relationship between the Washington Bullets and veteran forward Bernard King reached the breaking point yesterday, when the four-time NBA All-Star was suspended for four days "for conduct detrimental to the team."The suspension, which extends through Monday and cannot be appealed, will cost King one game's sal- ary -- about $30,000. It resulted from a shouting and shoving match between King and coach Wes Unseld at a team practice Monday morning.Yesterday, general manager John Nash canceled a scouting trip to Philadelphia and returned to Washington to confer with Unseld, team owner Abe Pollin, vice chairman Jerry Sachs, president Susan O'Malley and legal counsel Dave Osnos over what action to take on King.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
Bernard King made it perfectly clear Tuesday he wants to speed the decision-making process, but an NBA spokesman said yesterday that the Washington Bullets will be given "reasonable time" to determine whether to activate or release the veteran forward who has not played since undergoing knee surgery in September 1991.Generally, a team is given seven to 10 days to reactivate a player coming off the injured list. But because of King's unusual circumstances, the Bullets are getting an extension in evaluating his physical condition.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 9, 1993
Short on vision, shorter on luck, only the Bullets could find themselves in a position where a gifted scorer with an unparalleled work ethic might actually be harmful to the team.The player, of course, is Bernard King. His latest comeback is to be admired, but only from afar. It's time for the Bullets to purge this last remaining dinosaur. If they're so committed to youth, then show it.This is not about King, who displays an indomitable spirit rare among professional athletes. This is about a star-crossed franchise that finally chose a direction, and again is threatening to veer off course.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | January 2, 1993
Wes Unseld and the Washington Bullets experienced their first major surprise of 1993 when former All-Star forward Bernard King appeared unexpectedly at the team's New Year's practice at Bowie State.King, 36, who has not played since undergoing arthroscopic surgery Sept. 6, 1991, to remove cartilage from his right knee, met with Unseld for more than an hour and revealed his plans to resume his 13-year NBA career.But Unseld said a number of things must happen before King is reactivated, beginning with a complete physical by the Bullets medical staff, which could take place as early as today.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
With the Washington Bullets opening training camp tomorro at Shepherd College in preparation for the 1992-93 NBA season, here are 20 questions you have been dying to ask during the off-season:1) Were there more Elvis sightings this past year than of Bernard King?2) Will Charles Jones again average more personal fouls than points?3) After his whirlwind tour of Europe, does rookie Tom Gugliotta have more frequent-flier miles than Tom McMillen?4) Was that the Fuji blimp flying over RFK Stadium or an inflatable John Williams doll?
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
LANDOVER -- Tom Gugliotta, who received his only Division I scholarship offer from North Carolina State four years ago, completed his rags-to-riches basketball story last night when the Washington Bullets made the versatile 6-foot-9 1/2 forward their No. 1 pick in the 1992 NBA draft.The selection of Gugliotta -- who led the Atlantic Coast Conference in rebounding (9.8) and finished second in scoring (22.5) as he blossomed into an all-conference choice his senior year -- was not well received by the estimated 2,000 draftniks at the Capital Centre.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
LANDOVER -- Tom Gugliotta, who received his only Division I scholarship offer from North Carolina State four years ago, completed his rags-to-riches basketball story last night when the Washington Bullets made the versatile 6-foot-9 1/2 forward their No. 1 pick in the 1992 NBA draft.The selection of Gugliotta -- who led the Atlantic Coast Conference in rebounding (9.8) and finished second in scoring (22.5) as he blossomed into an all-conference choice his senior year -- was not well received by the estimated 2,000 draftniks at the Capital Centre.
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