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NEWS
May 18, 1993
For a possible $5 million gain -- one-quarter of 1 percent of the city's $2 billion budget -- Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke is willing to set back regionalism, annoy potential allies in the suburbs and unintentionally fuel the most negative perceptions about city government.Is that really worth $5 million?That's roughly the amount Mayor Schmoke said city coffers eventually would gain if all city employees were required to live in Baltimore as a condition of employment. The mayor has ordered that, as of July 1, any new hire would have to agree to move into the city within a year.
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NEWS
By David W. Wise | May 27, 2014
This year marks the passage of one century since of the start of the First World War. It is the year that will mark the 75th anniversary of the Nazi invasion of Poland, which launched the Second World War. It is also the year that will mark a quarter of a century since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The two world wars were catastrophic events in which Europe, motivated by parochial interests and fears, divided up against itself and unleashed the greatest violence ever known in history, resulting in the deaths of 76 million.
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FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | December 19, 1991
When the Berlin Wall was breached in 1989, this concrete barrier quickly became the source of souvenir chunks of Cold War history. As East German hands chipped at one side of the Berlin Wall and West German hands hacked away at the other, its joyous destruction erased it from all but our collective memory.For American photographer Leland Rice, who began an extensive series of pictures of the West German side of the graffiti-covered Berlin Wall in 1983, this sudden rewriting of history affects how we now look at his photographic series from the '80s.
NEWS
February 18, 2014
I'm glad I'm not the only one who's detected blatant Russia bashing in media coverage of the Olympics ( "A distorted view of Russia," Feb. 16). It's a case of chronic American superiority. A lot of people condemn Vladimir Putin's position on gay rights (even Maryland First Lady Catherine Curran O'Malley said she felt guilty about watching the games). But Russia has its rules and won't allow any group to tell them what to do. Americans should be concerned about what's wrong here before we condemn someone else.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 10, 1991
As long as the Berlin Wall was there, Leland Rice's photographs of it had a built-in pertinence; they could be read as symbols of much, including the tragedy of a nation which through its will to dominate and destroy brought about its own downfall and division.Now that the wall is gone and Germany is one again, these photographs -- a group of which are on view at the C. Grimaldis Gallery -- cease to reflect a present reality. Although they continue to have validity as a historical record, they are now much more on their own as pure works of art, and must sink or swim on that basis.
NEWS
By HECTOR TOBAR and HECTOR TOBAR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 26, 2006
MEXICO CITY -- "The wall" does not yet exist, and it might never be built, but already its 700 miles of fencing and electric sensors loom like a new Berlin Wall in the Latin American imagination. The proposed barrier along the Mexican border was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives in December and is scheduled to be debated by the Senate next month. In Spanish, they call it el muro. El muro has been a focus of news for weeks not only in countries such as Mexico and El Salvador that are increasingly dependent on the dollars migrants send home, but also in faraway Argentina and Chile.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | August 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Lawyers for Haitian refugees told the Supreme Court yesterday that the Bush administration was putting up a "floating Berlin Wall" around their homeland to stop them from "escaping a murderous dictatorship."Seeking to raise the temperature of the legal debate over the administration's 2-month-old policy of returning the boat people to Haiti, the refugees' attorneys said that policy was just as illegal as drowning them would be.The full court was studying the administration's plea to postpone a federal appeals court ruling this week striking down the policy.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | January 21, 1992
BERLIN -- A 26-year-old former East German border guard at the Berlin Wall became yesterday the first person sentenced to prison for carrying out the orders of his government by killing a man trying to escape to the West.Chief Judge Theodor Seidel called on the principle of the Nuremberg war crimes tribunal after World War II in sentencing Ingo Heinrich to 3 1/2 years in jail for shooting Chris Gueffroy and his companion, Christian Gaudian, who were trying to flee to West Berlin in 1989."There is a central area of justice which no law can encroach upon," the judge said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 21, 2004
The East German government's official name for it was the "anti-fascist protective rampart." Construction began in August 1961. It ran 30 miles, twisting and turning from north to south, quarantining the eastern / Soviet sector from the rest of Berlin. In some points 13 feet tall, it was flanked by a "death strip" as much as 200 yards wide over which guards maintained constant armed surveillance. Here and there was a second, lower wall. Fully developed, it had 297 watchtowers. When demolition began in 1989, it had stood firm for twice as long as Adolf Hitler had ruled Germany.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | May 9, 1993
BERLIN -- The cost of reuniting Germany has become a heav burden for the women of the east.They gained the right to travel when the Berlin Wall came down and communism collapsed. But most don't have the money to go anywhere. They gained the right to choose where they want to work. But they lost their jobs. They won political freedom but lost social independence.In the old Communist German Democratic Republic (GDR), 92 percent of the women worked. Now women make up 62 percent of the unemployed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | April 22, 2013
This week's Race takes us to Berlin to learn that 1) historical quotes are hard, yo, and 2) hipsters in Berlin win at hipstering. It's the Final Five teams, because we lost Chuck and Wynona in Switzerland after some improperly transported cheese. But they'll always have ... The Mullet. In the middle of the night, teams leave Switzerland and take a train to Dresden, Germany. In some interviews, we learn that Max and Katie are surprised to not be winning every leg. Joey and Meghan are embarrassed to be in last place.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The recent editorial on arms control ("Avoiding Armageddon," Feb. 18) was exactly on point. More than two decades have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and U.S. national security strategy has changed drastically. Yet many in Congress still refuse to heed the growing bipartisan chorus of former government officials and military leaders who argue that our current arsenal of approximately 5,000 nuclear weapons greatly exceeds U.S. security needs. Our government plans to spend approximately $640 billion on nuclear weapons and related programs over the next decade.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | December 13, 2012
Last week, while driving to work, I heard an NPR story that included snippets of an interview with a woman who had just applied for a marriage license. This would not have been newsworthy if not for the fact that she was gay. On Nov. 6, voters in Washington, Maryland and Maine approved marriage equality laws. Last Thursday was the first day that gay and lesbian couples in Washington state could fill out forms and exercise their new right. It was a very long time coming, so I would have forgiven the woman for screaming with joy or drenching the microphone in tears, but that's not what she did. I didn't catch her name or what town she was from, but give or take a syllable, she said something like this: "It feels good to finally be normal," happily and wearily, as if she had finally set down a very heavy weight.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
The style of fence is called "Barcelona," but some residents of Tuscany-Canterbury say it reminds them more of Berlin. It's the "Gorbachev fence" to the mother of neighbor Fred Chalfant, who often walks his dog past the barrier, which is six-feet tall, topped with spikes and divides West 39th Street down the middle. Last week, Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke called it “a Berlin Wall of a fence,” as she demanded justification for the fence's appearance, in a letter to the city's Department of Transportation, which erected the fence in mid-April.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2010
"Berlin" Lonely Planet, $11.99 This is a small, intimate guide to Berlin, that most modern of cities, perfect for carrying around in your pocket or purse. Berlin is very much focused on the present, not the past. If profligacy seems to be its reason for being, and that is the impression one gets after perusing this guide, it does have its somber sides too, because Berlin is a city that combines the horrific with the hedonistic. Hence, visitors can partake of the city's numerous cabarets and clubs but also visit the Jewish Museum, an interactive journey through 2,000 years of Berlin's Jewish history, or see with their own eyes Checkpoint Charlie, the gateway between West and East Berlin in the Cold War. But, warns author Andrea Schulte-Peevers, it is little more than a "tacky tourist trap" where "uniformed actors" pose in front of the replica of a guardhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 12, 2010
The horizontal, rectangular photograph, stretching 80 inches across a wall of C. Grimaldis Gallery, jolts the viewer with a sea of aluminum siding. In the far left corner, a piece of bold blue sky can be seen behind a jutting, K-style gutter. Welcome to "Wasteland." This image by Sofia Silva, titled "siding," is one of 20 compelling works in an exhibit that casts an eye - at once coolly objective and hotly provocative - on a desensitized world. "It's about wasted time, wasted things, wasted political systems," Grimaldis says of the show, which features six artists, most of them local.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
For more than 50 years, the center of Berlin has been a theme park of 20th-century infamy.Look down the wide boulevard of Unter den Linden and you see the path where Adolf Hitler's legions goose-stepped through their grandest parades. Look up at the bronze horses atop the Brandenburg Gate and you see a monument that was the centerpiece of the Cold War's most despised and important boundary.Gaze a block or so to the north and you can't miss the hulk of the Reichstag, the parliamentary building abused by Hitler for his own devices in 1933, then seized upon by photographers at the end of World War II as it stood in ruins, the ultimate symbol of an empire tossed upon the scrap heap.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a jab at congressional Republicans who have rejected increases in foreign aid, President Clinton chose the 10th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall to urge the United States yesterday to continue its leading role in international affairs."
NEWS
By Agence France-Presse | November 9, 2009
BERLIN - -Germany's capital warmed up for the 20th anniversary of the Wall's fall with events throughout the city, as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called for a new trans-Atlantic push to free those still oppressed. "Our history did not end the night the Wall came down," Clinton told current and former European and U.S. political heavyweights on the eve of the celebrations marking the end of the Cold War and the continent's division. "To expand freedom to more people, we cannot accept that freedom does not belong to all people.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | December 14, 2007
As a rule, the Republicans campaigning for president sound more like they are running for sheriff of Yuma County, Ariz. In this race, the acceptable lines on illegal immigration are hard, harder and hardest. It's rare to hear someone call for policies that include "love and compassion," as Sen. John McCain did in Sunday's Univision debate. Compassion for illegal immigrants? Is he kidding? In reality, Mr. McCain is truer to GOP tradition than Mike Huckabee, who says, "I will take our country back for those who belong here," or Rudolph W. Giuliani, who says foreigners should have to carry cards with biometric identifiers, or Mitt Romney, who insists Mr. Huckabee and Mr. Giuliani are not nearly tough enough.
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