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By ASSOCATED PRESS | January 11, 1992
BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) -- Christopher Columbus was tossed overboard yesterday by city officials who declared Oct. 12 "Indigenous Peoples Day," stripping the explorer of his honored day in this politically correct city.The city also declared 1992, the 500th anniversary of Columbus' landing in America, "The Year of Indigenous People.""Berkeley wants to celebrate the important place that indigenous people hold in this country," Mayor Loni Hancock said yesterday. "Their societies and philosophies flourished long before Columbus arrived and they continue until today."
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 17, 2014
I was phoned the other night in middle of dinner by an earnest young man named Spencer, who said he was doing a survey. Rather than hang up, I agreed to answer his questions. He asked me if I knew a soda tax would be on the ballot in Berkeley, Calif. in November. When I said yes, he then asked whether I trusted the Berkeley city government to spend the revenues wisely. At that moment I recognized a classic "push poll," which is part of a paid political campaign. So I asked Spencer a couple of questions of my own. Who was financing his survey?
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 23, 1991
The trouble with the past is that it changes and re-changes as you move away from it, eventually becoming merely a collection of images seen through an accumulation of memory filters.Thus, the decade of the '60s is remembered for hippies and Black Panthers, student protest and Free Love, anti-war marches and B-52s bombing the bejabbers out of Vietnam (eerily, just as they recently bombed Iraq).But where did it all start? "The Mecca for a generation" was the campus of the University of California at Berkeley, asserts "Berkeley in the Sixties," the latest edition of the PBS series "P.O.
NEWS
By Jonathan David Farley | July 22, 2014
I was on my way to a meeting on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley years ago when a man hawking the socialist Workers Vanguard newspaper stopped me. The headline screamed, "Open Admissions!" In other words, the prestigious University of California at Berkeley should let anybody in. I tried to reason with the man selling the newspaper - I know, I was young and naive - that, even in the Soviet Union, universities did not have open admissions policies. The elite schools were for the best students; most people probably could not go to university at all. The man denounced me as an enemy of the worker, so I turned around and proceeded to the meeting.
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | August 19, 1998
BERKELEY, Calif. -- Minority enrollment at the University of California at Berkeley Law School will increase slightly in this year compared with a year ago, admissions officials said.As the law school approaches a second year without affirmative action in admissions, officials announced that minority admissions will be up 32 over what they were at the beginning of the 1997-1998 school year.The increase brings the number of minority students enrolled at the law school to 85 of the total 275 students.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1997
William E. Kirwan, the affable mathematician who has won widespread praise for improving the University of Maryland College Park as its president since 1989, ruled himself out yesterday as a candidate for chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley.Although he said he had not sought the job, Kirwan met in Oakland last week with University of California regents and other members of a search committee who were interviewing a handful of finalists contending to succeed Berkeley Chancellor Chang-Lin Tien.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 30, 1990
The festival of politics, mischief, partying hearty and sanctimony known as the Age of Aquarius gets a nice revisit in "Berkeley in the Sixties," an ambitious documentary finishing up a two-day run tonight at the Charles.It's hardly a tough-minded revisionist work, but, to its credit, neither is it one of those treacly magical mystery tours of a past that never existed except in its participants' self-delusions.The bias is solidly Old Left, with the emphasis on political action as true cause and concurrent aspects of the phenomenon -- the hippie counterculture, which was both of and yet not-of the left -- viewed as self-indulgent infantilism.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 29, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Navy's water polo players will be able to tell their grandchildren about this one. Better still, they can tell their girlfriends about it next summer.If they're at a party and an American water polo match from the Olympics in Barcelona is on television, the Mids will be sure to point out Chris Humbert, a 6-foot-7 left-hander."If they want to impress some chicks," said Navy coach Mike Schofield, "they can say they guarded Humbert in the NCAAs."That's what they will do, or attempt to do, when they confront Humbert and top-seeded California-Berkeley today in the first round of the NCAA championships in Long Beach, Calif.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
BERKELEY, Calif. -- At first glance, Theodore J. Kaczynski might think not much has changed here since he left in 1969. Then, he was a young, short-haired and conservatively dressed professor. Berkeley was an epicenter of the political and social earthquakes rocking the country.Today students still march outside the administration building, waving signs and handing out leaflets. On bulletin boards, fliers announce a free speech rally.But the quiet professor and the fervent community have left much of themselves behind.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
An Alex. Brown Inc. executive has surfaced as a leading candidate to head the Nasdaq Stock Market Inc., a source familiar with the selection process said yesterday.Alfred R. Berkeley III, managing director at the Baltimore-based investment banking company, is one of a handful of executives in the running to become president of the nation's second-largest stock market -- the Nasdaq."He's got the skill sets that would be good; he certainly understands technology; he certainly understands the financial markets both from the underwriting and the back office point of view," the source said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
Susa Kessler, a retired World Bank analyst who had fled Nazi Germany as a child, died of breast cancer complications Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Canton resident was 88. Born in Stuttgart, Germany, she was the daughter of Dr. Caesar Hirsch, an ear, nose and throat doctor, and Felicia Hearst. Family members said that her father heard that Adolf Hitler and his government planned to blacklist him because he was a Jew. "To avoid arrest, Dr. Hirsch sent his children to Switzerland in the company of their grandmother," said Ms. Kessler's son, John J. "Jack" Condliffe of Timonium.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 2, 2011
I have no beef with the student Republicans. Oh, I disagree with them about affirmative action, and probably a dozen other things as well. But I am not troubled - amused, but not troubled - by the way they've expressed their view. Unfortunately, others have been less sanguine. The story goes as follows: The GOP student group at the University of California at Berkeley wanted to illustrate its opposition to pending legislation that would allow state universities to consider race, gender, ethnicity and national origin as factors in admission.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 8, 2011
Brig. Gen. Raymond J. Winkel Jr., a retired career Army officer and a Vietnam War veteran who was chairman of the physics department at West Point for more than two decades, died Aug. 30 of cancer at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda. He was 65. The son of a civil engineer and a homemaker, General Winkel was born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville. He attended Polytechnic Institute and was 17 when appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.
NEWS
April 18, 2010
Redbud Weekend in Berkeley Springs Where: Throughout Berkeley Springs, W. Va., about a two-hour drive from Baltimore. When: Friday, Saturday and April 25 What: Spring celebration includes arts exhibitions, theater, wildlife encounters, celestial observations and guided hikes at Eidolon Nature Preserve. Visitors can go to Berkeley Springs Visitors Center, 127 Fairfax St., to pick up a Redbud Weekend brochure, which includes directions for a self-guided driving tour of all activities and a map. Nature Niche, at 50 Washington St., offers brochures and a free redbud seedling (while supplies last)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
"Gold Diggers of 1933," this weekend's entry in the Charles Theatre's blissfully eccentric Saturday revival series, is one of those relics from a bygone era that can't help but win your heart. Director Mervyn LeRoy and, especially, choreographer Busby Berkeley turned on all the charm they could find, employed just about every chorus girl within a 20-mile radius of Hollywood (maybe that's an exaggeration, but not by much) and managed to put out a movie that made the Depression appear exciting and, more important, winnable.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 5, 2009
Kingsley Blake Price, a retired philosophy professor who taught at the Johns Hopkins University for more than three decades, died Oct. 27 of multiple organ failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 92. Born in Salem, Ind., the son of a Baptist minister and homemaker, he later moved with his family to Santa Rosa, Calif., until finally settling in Berkeley, Calif. He was 3 1/2 years old when he fell ill with scarlet fever, which left him blind. As a boy, he was encouraged by his parents, who sent him to a boarding school to learn Braille, to do things for himself.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Michael Dresser, Thomas W. Waldron and Marego Athans, and news researcher Robert Schrott contributed to this article | June 2, 1998
A vice chancellor and distinguished engineering professor who is an accomplished fund-raiser at the University of California, Berkeley, is expected to become the next president of the University of Maryland, College Park, sources said last night.Clayton Daniel Mote Jr., vice chancellor of university relations and a longtime professor of mechanical engineering at Berkeley, was expected to be introduced today as the new president of UM's flagship campus, according to sources.Donald N. Langenberg, chancellor of the University System of Maryland, would not confirm Mote's selection, but said there would be an announcement today.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
NEW YORK -- Less than a block from Grand Central Station, a new stock market is being born. It doesn't employ hundreds of shouting traders, have a slick Madison Avenue advertising campaign or fancy offices. Instead, a tangle of gray computer and phone wires hangs from the ceiling, secondhand desks abut each other and employees in the sales group, help desk, operations and marketing departments are jammed into a small white room tucked away from the bustling crowd on East 42nd Street. "We do have a Renoir on the wall," quipped Alfred R. Berkeley III, chairman of Pipeline Trading Systems LLC, noting a cheap framed print of a painting by Pierre Auguste Renoir that hangs in a corner.
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