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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- One look at the size of the orchestra that waited for Boris Berezovsky to begin Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto at the Kennedy Center on Sunday was enough to let one know that something unusual was about to happen.The Bolshoi Symphony Orchestra, which had opened its program under music director Peter Feranec earlier with excerpts from the same composer's "Sleeping Beauty," had been reduced in size to a slender five double basses and six cellos from a beefy nine double basses and 12 cellos.
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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- The Russian businessman accused by British prosecutors of fatally poisoning former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London turned the tables yesterday and blamed the death on British secret services -- and a fierce opponent of the Kremlin who lives in self-imposed exile in Britain. Andrei Lugovoi, a former bodyguard with the KGB, also alleged that Litvinenko had been recruited as a spy for Britain's Secret Intelligence Service and that Litvinenko had tried in turn to recruit him to gather "compromising material" on Russian President Vladimir V. Putin.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 4, 1995
You can't tell young Russian pianists nowadays without a score card.It was only a few weeks ago that Evgeny Kissin performed the Tchaikovsky Concerto on a TV broadcast from Carnegie Hall; last Monday, Eldar Nebolsin played Chopin and Prokofiev at the Kennedy Center; and tomorrow afternoon, Boris Berezovsky will perform the ubiquitous Tchaikovsky with the Bolshoi Symphony at the Kennedy Center.Berezovsky's recordings of Schumann, Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Ravel and Liszt have so impressed Great Britain's prestigious Gramophone magazine that it calls the 25-year-old pianist, the first-prize winner of Moscow's 1990 Tchaikovsky Competition, "the truest successor to the great Russian pianists."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | December 8, 2006
MOSCOW -- The air here is so thick with speculation about the poisoning death of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko that there are now conspiracy theories about the conspiracy theories. First, a recap of the best, or worst, of them: Litvinenko was killed by the Kremlin. Litvinenko was killed by someone who wanted to make it look like he was killed by the Kremlin. Litvinenko killed himself to make it look like he was killed by the Kremlin. Litvinenko was killed accidentally while building a nuclear bomb for Chechen rebels - or while smuggling radioactive materials to earn desperately needed money.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 28, 1997
MOSCOW -- Boris A. Berezovsky's emergence as one of the power brokers of the new Russia was confirmed spectacularly in 1994. Splashy assassinations were just coming into vogue as the favored way to settle business disputes. Someone attached a bomb to Berezovsky's car and blew it up on a busy Moscow street. His driver was killed, but Berezovsky was unharmed.He was caught up in another explosion last week. This one was political. His hand reportedly lighted the fuse on the bombshell that blasted Anatoly B. Chubais' reputation to smithereens.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 5, 1995
Shostakovich, String Quartets Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14 and 15, performed by the Beethoven Quartet (Consonance 81-3005, 81-3006, 81-3007, 81-3008); Prokofiev, Sonatas Nos. 1 and 2, "Five Melodies," performed by violinist Vadim Repin and pianist Boris Berezovsky (Erato 0630-10698-2):Shostakovich and Prokofiev have had ups and downs in reputation in the past 50 years, but it seems to safe to say that no 20th-century composers have a firmer place in the standard repertory. Every string quartet performs the 15 string quartets of Shostakovich, which now seem to have surpassed the six of Bartok as the greatest body of work in the genre since those of Beethoven.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 1998
MOSCOW -- Almost immediately, the tales of conspiracy and intrigue began to emerge: secret meetings on the French Riviera, clandestine midnight visits to the Russian White House, nervous encounters at country houses.President Boris N. Yeltsin's abrupt dismissal of his prime minister, Sergei V. Kiriyenko, Sunday night was so shocking that many Russians could only imagine it was accomplished by the most elaborate of schemes.Reporters and commentators have been presenting their theories with relish the past few days.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
MOSCOW - An unidentified gunman shot and killed Sergei N. Yushenkov, a legislator and co-chairman of the Western-style Liberal Russia Party, in front of his home here last night. The assassination, the second fatal shooting of a Liberal Russia leader in eight months, occurred hours after Yushenkov announced that the new party had registered to run candidates in parliamentary elections scheduled for December. An aide told the Interfax news service Yushenkov, 52, was shot several times in the chest after getting out of his car and walking to the doorstep of his apartment house.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 1999
MOSCOW -- In an astonishing and unprecedented attack on Russia's powerful financial barons, the prosecutor general's office issued an arrest warrant last night for Boris A. Berezovsky and said it also was seeking Alexander P. Smolensky for questioning.Each was accused of illegally making off with millions of dollars, but in a country where nearly everyone is considered guilty of something, there was little speculation about whether the charges were true.When scandalous accusations arise here, Russians rarely ask, "Did he do it?"
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 5, 2000
MOSCOW - The man who controls Russia's largest television network said yesterday that the government was trying to take it away from him, but he vowed to give it away to others before allowing the Kremlin of Vladimir V. Putin to seize control. "If I cede to the ultimatum," Boris A. Berezovsky told Putin in a letter that he made public, "TV information will cease in Russia and will be replaced by TV propaganda controlled by your aides." Berezovsky, who assembled a business empire in oil and car sales, developed close and apparently profitable ties to former President Boris N. Yeltsin and freely used his network to promote his political interests, is casting himself in the unlikely role of defender of a free press.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 3, 2006
LONDON --The tangled tale of Alexander V. Litvinenko, the maverick KGB agent turned dissident who died of radiation poisoning last month, has seized the headlines in recent days, but its roots can be traced to a summer's evening in Moscow in 1994. On June 7, Boris A. Berezovsky, a powerful Russian oligarch, was leaving his car dealership in a chauffeured Mercedes. He and his bodyguard were sitting in the rear seat behind the driver. A remote-controlled bomb detonated, decapitating the driver but leaving Berezovsky unscathed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
MOSCOW - An unidentified gunman shot and killed Sergei N. Yushenkov, a legislator and co-chairman of the Western-style Liberal Russia Party, in front of his home here last night. The assassination, the second fatal shooting of a Liberal Russia leader in eight months, occurred hours after Yushenkov announced that the new party had registered to run candidates in parliamentary elections scheduled for December. An aide told the Interfax news service Yushenkov, 52, was shot several times in the chest after getting out of his car and walking to the doorstep of his apartment house.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 5, 2000
MOSCOW - The man who controls Russia's largest television network said yesterday that the government was trying to take it away from him, but he vowed to give it away to others before allowing the Kremlin of Vladimir V. Putin to seize control. "If I cede to the ultimatum," Boris A. Berezovsky told Putin in a letter that he made public, "TV information will cease in Russia and will be replaced by TV propaganda controlled by your aides." Berezovsky, who assembled a business empire in oil and car sales, developed close and apparently profitable ties to former President Boris N. Yeltsin and freely used his network to promote his political interests, is casting himself in the unlikely role of defender of a free press.
NEWS
July 22, 2000
IN JUST seven months as Russia's president, Vladimir Putin has consolidated power in ways Boris N. Yeltsin never could. The once-rebellious parliament now kowtows to the former KGB officer. The latest example: It is curbing the regional governors' pre-eminence. In recent weeks, the Kremlin has strengthened its hand in other ways, too. Through tax audits and criminal investigations, it has moved systematically against the "oligarchs." Those shady money men became fabulously wealthy and politically influential when state properties were privatized.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 21, 2000
MOSCOW -- Aleksandr Khinshtein, a 25-year-old newspaper reporter with a penchant for writing nasty articles about powerful officials, was home in bed when the police came for him. In a chilling reminder of the Soviet past, they were armed with a warrant to take him to a mental hospital. "It was a political order," his mother, Inna A. Regider, said yesterday. "It's the same thing they used to do to dissidents. He's completely healthy mentally and they're looking for an excuse." Although his lawyer managed to fend off the police in a five-hour confrontation, Khinshtein went into hiding yesterday.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 24, 1999
MOSCOW -- When the fire department shut down a leading newspaper here, it was a sure sign that the election season was getting under way."Stupidity," was how Andrei Vasiliev, the newly appointed editor of Kommersant, described the action yesterday, but nevertheless the newspaper was off the stands and will be again today. Vasiliev, who expects to resume publishing tomorrow, said he is sure that the shutdown had nothing to do with fire safety and everything to do with politics.With Russia's parliamentary elections less than four months away, the players are frantically choosing up sides.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 15, 1994
Rachmaninoff, Sonata No. 1 in D minor (opus 28) and Variations on a Theme of Chopin (opus 22), performed by pianist Boris Berezovsky (Teldec 4509-90890). Rachmaninoff, Sonata No. 1 in D minor (opus 28) and Thirteen Preludes (opus 32), performed by pianist Santiago Rodriguez (Elan CD 82244).This is an embarrassment of riches. For years Rachmaninoff's First Sonata has fared poorly on records and in the concert hall. The work is gigantic -- almost as long the Concerto No. 3 -- and horrendously difficult.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 3, 2006
LONDON --The tangled tale of Alexander V. Litvinenko, the maverick KGB agent turned dissident who died of radiation poisoning last month, has seized the headlines in recent days, but its roots can be traced to a summer's evening in Moscow in 1994. On June 7, Boris A. Berezovsky, a powerful Russian oligarch, was leaving his car dealership in a chauffeured Mercedes. He and his bodyguard were sitting in the rear seat behind the driver. A remote-controlled bomb detonated, decapitating the driver but leaving Berezovsky unscathed.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 1999
MOSCOW -- In an astonishing and unprecedented attack on Russia's powerful financial barons, the prosecutor general's office issued an arrest warrant last night for Boris A. Berezovsky and said it also was seeking Alexander P. Smolensky for questioning.Each was accused of illegally making off with millions of dollars, but in a country where nearly everyone is considered guilty of something, there was little speculation about whether the charges were true.When scandalous accusations arise here, Russians rarely ask, "Did he do it?"
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 18, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russian leaders gave final approval to a political truce yesterday but, without taking the time to dust themselves off, immediately resumed some of the nastiest, dirtiest fighting in recent memory.The blows being struck are so underhanded and the logic behind them so obscure and Byzantine that the battle should be amusing to watch -- except that Russia is in serious financial straits and has been earnestly trying to present itself to the International Monetary Fund as a chastened scofflaw that can now be trusted with billions more dollars in loans.
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