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By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 23, 1995
I love berets and have worn them for years. This winter I want to experiment with other types of hats -- something more feminine. I can't wear anything too fussy and wonder if you can help me choose something for my conservative style. And how about a few suggestions on how to wear them?Patricia Underwood, a New York designer who makes simply shaped but extremely feminine hats, suggests you start experimenting with a "Padre-style" hat: "It has a brim which turns up and away from the face.
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By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
Even as a teenager, breaking swimming records at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club, Joey Curreri was leaving a mark as deep as his churning wake in the water. "He was, hands down, the most motivated individual I've ever encountered," said Brad Schertle, a fellow swimmer and longtime friend. "Joey was Michael Phelps before Michael Phelps was." The Pentagon announced yesterday that Staff Sgt. Joseph F. Curreri, a 27-year-old Green Beret in the Army's Special Forces, drowned last week while serving in the Philippines.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 6, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Army has reversed itself and authorized a coveted combat badge for hundreds of soldiers who served under fire as advisers in El Salvador, recognition delayed in some cases for more than 15 years by domestic politics and Pentagon red tape.Gen. Dennis J. Reimer, the Army's chief of staff, has approved the Combat Infantryman Badge for soldiers -- mostly Green Berets -- who served as advisers from 1981 to 1992, when a peace accord between the Salvadoran government and Marxist rebels ended the conflict, the Army said in a statement yesterday.
NEWS
By ERIK SWABB | June 20, 2006
It is convenient for military leaders to blame civilian officials for wars that go south. The armed forces did it after Vietnam, citing civilian interference with military decisions. In April, a group of retired generals called for the removal of Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. The generals asserted that U.S. forces were capable of suppressing the Iraqi insurgency after the invasion - they just needed civilian leaders who listened to military advice and provided a sufficient number of troops.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
FORT CARSON, Colo. - Not since the Vietnam War has the Army punished a soldier for being too scared to do his duty. But tomorrow, Staff Sgt. Georg-Andreas Pogany will appear before a military court here to face charges of cowardice. The Army says he is guilty of "cowardly conduct as a result of fear" and not performing his duties as an interrogator for a squad of Green Berets in Samarra, Iraq. But Pogany says he did not run from the enemy or disobey orders. The only thing he is guilty of, he says, is asking for help for a panic attack.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - When you've waited in line for 5 1/2 hours to buy a $20 blue piece of fleece polyester, it's hard to find the right word to describe yourself. But Jennifer Crouch seems to have nailed it. "We're pretty much insane," she said. Crouch is just one of the thousands who has been caught up in a whole different kind of Olympic fever over the past few weeks. The hottest item in town isn't figure skating or hockey tickets, it's blue U.S.A. 2002 berets made by a Canadian clothing company called Roots.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - They rode alongside Afghan soldiers in cavalry charges and called in airstrikes from B-52 bombers. Now the Army's elite Green Berets are getting ready to provide another service to Afghanistan: training a national army. The Green Berets "will lead the effort" and begin working with Afghan recruits "within the next month or so," says one military officer, adding that troops from the international coalition also will assist in training and equipping the new army, which Afghan leaders hope will someday grow to 50,000 soldiers.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. troops will soon begin training recruits for a new Afghan army, with the goal of boosting security and safeguarding Afghanistan's borders, Pentagon officials said yesterday. The mission will be led by Army Green Beret troops who will start the training in late spring, officials said. They said the U.S. troops would use a series of 10-week training cycles to create a projected total of 2,400 Afghan soldiers. "Training the Afghan army will serve as a positive step to help ensure that there is a better chance for peace and security in Afghanistan and that the country is not used as a terrorist haven in the future," Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said yesterday.
FEATURES
By Pascale Lemaire | August 11, 1991
Summer's the season for hats. But not just drab brown o black fedoras and berets made to keep heads warm. In summer, hats are a riot of color and style. Of course straw hats take center stage during the warm weather, but there's incredible diversity even among them. Whether for sun or fun, why not try one on for size?
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 28, 2001
High-priced real estate in Baltimore is going higher. If only the middle held up and the bottom wasn't abandoned. 2.4 percent of census respondents ticked ancestry from more than one race. The others are fibbing or guessing. The prize for violence goes to "Gladiator." Special effects violence, "Crouching Tiger." Year's best dope flick, "Traffic." Now that nobody in Europe wears them, the U.S. Army is into berets.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is offering bonuses of up to $150,000 to keep elite commandos, such as Army Green Berets and Navy SEALs, in the military and prevent them from being lured away to higher-paying jobs by private security contractors in places such as Iraq and Afghanistan, defense officials said. For more than a year, officials with these Special Operations forces have been concerned about losing their highly trained and long-serving servicemen, who have combat and language skills that take years to develop.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
FORT CARSON, Colo. - Not since the Vietnam War has the Army punished a soldier for being too scared to do his duty. But tomorrow, Staff Sgt. Georg-Andreas Pogany will appear before a military court here to face charges of cowardice. The Army says he is guilty of "cowardly conduct as a result of fear" and not performing his duties as an interrogator for a squad of Green Berets in Samarra, Iraq. But Pogany says he did not run from the enemy or disobey orders. The only thing he is guilty of, he says, is asking for help for a panic attack.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - They were crucial to the defeat of the Taliban government, calling in precision airstrikes while huddled in the hills with Afghan allies. And these shadowy warriors are playing an increasingly larger role in the overall war on terror, training foreign troops from the gorges of Georgia to the steamy jungles of the Philippines. Now, military leaders are looking at these special operations forces - from the Army's Green Berets to the Navy's SEALs - with heightened interest, proposing to increase their numbers, provide new equipment and set up more training missions with rank-and-file troops.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush moved yesterday to fill two top federal health jobs, nominating a trauma surgeon who is also a sheriff's deputy as surgeon general and Dr. Elias Zerhouni, an administrator at the Johns Hopkins University, to direct the National Institutes of Health. At a White House ceremony with the nominees and their families, Bush praised the two doctors, both of whom spoke of their humble beginnings, as "distinguished physicians who have worked tirelessly to save lives and to improve lives."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. troops will soon begin training recruits for a new Afghan army, with the goal of boosting security and safeguarding Afghanistan's borders, Pentagon officials said yesterday. The mission will be led by Army Green Beret troops who will start the training in late spring, officials said. They said the U.S. troops would use a series of 10-week training cycles to create a projected total of 2,400 Afghan soldiers. "Training the Afghan army will serve as a positive step to help ensure that there is a better chance for peace and security in Afghanistan and that the country is not used as a terrorist haven in the future," Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - They rode alongside Afghan soldiers in cavalry charges and called in airstrikes from B-52 bombers. Now the Army's elite Green Berets are getting ready to provide another service to Afghanistan: training a national army. The Green Berets "will lead the effort" and begin working with Afghan recruits "within the next month or so," says one military officer, adding that troops from the international coalition also will assist in training and equipping the new army, which Afghan leaders hope will someday grow to 50,000 soldiers.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 9, 2001
Cheer up. The Maryland General Assembly is closing down for another year. The United States and China should have agreed on rules of the game long before now. If the Chinese won't stop harassing U.S. spy planes in international air space (just), the Pentagon won't buy the army's new berets from China. So there. What a spring! The daffodils are late and the pitchers' battles remarkably early.
NEWS
December 30, 1997
Francis J. Kelly, 78, one of the founders of the Army's Green Berets, died Friday in Denver of complications from Alzheimer's disease.His wife, Elizabeth Baum Shwayder, said he was believed to be the most decorated combat colonel in the Vietnam War. John Wayne met with Mr. Kelly in Vietnam while preparing for the role of Col. Mike Kirby, a composite figure, in the 1968 movie "The Green Berets."Sidney Harshman, 67, an internationally respected microbiologist, died Thursday in Nashville, Tenn.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - When you've waited in line for 5 1/2 hours to buy a $20 blue piece of fleece polyester, it's hard to find the right word to describe yourself. But Jennifer Crouch seems to have nailed it. "We're pretty much insane," she said. Crouch is just one of the thousands who has been caught up in a whole different kind of Olympic fever over the past few weeks. The hottest item in town isn't figure skating or hockey tickets, it's blue U.S.A. 2002 berets made by a Canadian clothing company called Roots.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - An Army special forces soldier was killed yesterday during a firefight in eastern Afghanistan near the Pakistan border, the first member of the U.S. military to die from hostile fire in the 3-month-old conflict, defense officials said. A CIA officer, who was among those accompanying the special forces soldiers, was wounded by the small-arms fire but is expected to survive, officials said. No other U.S. personnel were hurt, officials said. The casualties were a reminder that U.S. forces in Afghanistan still face grave dangers despite the defeat of the Taliban regime and intensive attacks on the al-Qaida terrorist network.
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