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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels | January 30, 1992
Last year, 4-year-old Marcus Benson drew his picture of heaven on a chalkboard.It's where his mother is, he told Rosetta Graham, coordinating counselor of the city's 2-year-old Family Bereavement Center, set up to help survivors of homicide victims deal with their loss.In June, Marcus' mother, Tanja Brown-O'Neal, 29, was killed when a social services client, Arnold Bates, 34, attacked her with a butcher knife while she interviewed him at the Rosemont Multipurpose Center in West Baltimore, police said.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,sun reporter | May 1, 2007
Marlin Barnett Hopkins loved his mother's "party spaghetti," which was nothing more than a jar of Prego tossed with shrimp, smoked sausage and ground beef. Janice Letmate used to prepare a shrimp Creole that her children savored. And Steven R. Shores was partial to his sister's homemade Jewish apple cake. Those recipes and dozens more have been collected in a 78-page cookbook that is being released today not by the Baltimore Culinary Institute, but, tellingly, by a part of the city state's attorney office.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
Nearly 300 relatives, friends and co-workers filled First Evangelical Lutheran Church in Odenton yesterday to say goodbye to Betty Asplund, director of the Hospice of the Chesapeake's Bereavement Center, and a wife, mother and grandmother.The 51-year-old Millersville resident died Friday after a brief respiratory illness.Asplund was remembered as a woman strong in her Christian faith who always was willing to help others through the loss of a loved one.With the coffin draped in white cloth with red trim at the front of the sanctuary, the standing-room-only crowd cried and laughed a little as a longtime co-worker and friend and then Asplund's pastor remembered her life.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2005
Six years ago, Linda Turner's world was turned upside down when her 28-year-old husband, Kurt, was killed by a drunken driver. Turner, now 37, was unable to find sources of compassionate care outside of her family. "I felt like the youngest widow in the world," said Turner, whose son, Jonathan, is now almost 7 years old. "The whole trial thing was very difficult. [Survivors] don't know what to expect in the long term." Two years ago, Turner, who has a degree in marketing from the University of Maryland, decided that she could best use her experience in grief and healing by becoming a pastoral counselor and enrolled in Loyola College's Pastoral Counseling Program.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | April 21, 1991
"I lost my son on April 13, 1990, Good Friday. It wasn't very good for me. . . . I was mad. He was my only child and he was taken away from me. It was really hard to live with my anger and grief."Mary Williams"My son was murdered in January 1989; he was 18. He was a child who basically didn't give me much problem. . . . at 18 his life was cut off so short. It's very painful for me to rehash. The pain is so great. I wake up with it and I go to bed with it."Lula JohnsonThere have been 88 murders in Baltimore this year.
NEWS
By Ingrid Hansen and Ingrid Hansen,Contributing writer | May 15, 1991
In her seven years at the Arundel Hospice, Beverly Bassford believesshe's seen just about everything."I've seen young parents lose infants, young mothers lose young husbands. But regardless of age, I've seen families pull together," she said.Bassford, 56, the only executive director the hospice has known, will retire in July. While she will be staying on as a volunteer, Bassford looks forward to the joys of retirement -- including the opportunity to spend more time sailing with her husband of 33 years, Robert.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
Lula Johnson's patch includes flowers and a sun. Loretta Bailey's is highlighted by a simple inscription. And Delores Snyder-Miller's is decorated with hearts and stars.They are among about 40 representations of remembrances that make up a special Memorial Quilt honoring some of Baltimore's hundreds of murder victims.Patterned after the AIDS quilt, which includes thousands of panels commemorating victims of the disease, the Memorial Quilt was conceived and coordinated by the Baltimore state's attorney's Family Bereavement Center, which provides counseling and other services to families that have lost a member to murder.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 1998
CHESAPEAKE TREASURES, a secondhand store operated by Hospice of the Chesapeake volunteers, is moving to Severna Park's Park Plaza Feb. 4.Since opening in May, the shop has raised $20,000 for patient care and bereavement programs. For information, call 410-987-2003.Longtime hospice volunteer Pam Beidle of Beidle Insurance Agency in Glen Burnie has been elected to that organization's board of directors.She recently received national recognition when she wasawarded the 1998 Nationwide Insurance Community Service Award for dedication to civic causes.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE | September 15, 1994
A new season or holiday officially arrives at my house with the unfurling of a decorative flag -- last week it was the lowering of the summery blue and green magnolia banner and the raising of a more autumnal, cardinal red and gold design.The problem is that my hall closet is approaching overload, my banners changing as frequently as the phases of the moon.*Before we write the final chapter on the summer of 1994, here's what some of our kids were doing.* Fifty children and their adult "Big Buddies" spent an August weekend at Camp Nabe learning to cope with the death of aloved one.Sponsored by the Bereavement Center of Hospice of the Chesapeake, the camp meets annually at Arlington Echo Outdoor Educational Center in Millersville.
NEWS
By SUE HALLER | January 5, 1993
It's Day Five of the new year, and I haven't broken a single resolution.Of course, I don't make them anymore, so I don't have any to break. How about you?*The Arundel Citizens Advisory Committee will play host to state school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick at 7 p.m. tomorrow at Arundel High School to discuss the Maryland School Performance Program. Everyone in the Arundel feeder system is encouraged to attend.For information, call Tom Frank, 261-6181.*The Care and Share Support Group, for parents of children ages 3 to 6, will meet on Thursday mornings for the next six weeks at the Anne Arundel Health Education Center in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2002
All the basic ingredients for a holiday party were there: sandwiches and punch, cookies and cakes, three dozen people and an undecorated Christmas tree. Held in an overheated room on the fourth floor of the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, it had jokes and carols, dancers and door prizes, hearty hugs and words of inspiration. But this party was more about who wasn't there: Everette Farmer, Terrance Thompson, Donald Bentley, Brian Bailey, Keisha Spriggs, Barbara Halsey, to name just a few on a mind-numbingly long list - all homicide victims in a city that, through the 1990s, consistently chalked up one of the highest murder rates in the nation.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2002
FOR MORE THAN a decade, Camp Nabe has been helping children cope with the loss of a family member or friend. Held one weekend each August at Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center on the Severn River, the camp is offered free by Hospice of the Chesapeake's bereavement center. The camp provides a relaxed, outdoor setting where children of elementary and middle school age can express their feelings. Because of Camp Nabe's success - more than 60 children applied for last year's camp, creating a waiting list of more than 20 children who were unable to attend - planners considered adding another camp this year like Nabe that would accommodate schoolchildren of all ages.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 1998
CHESAPEAKE TREASURES, a secondhand store operated by Hospice of the Chesapeake volunteers, is moving to Severna Park's Park Plaza Feb. 4.Since opening in May, the shop has raised $20,000 for patient care and bereavement programs. For information, call 410-987-2003.Longtime hospice volunteer Pam Beidle of Beidle Insurance Agency in Glen Burnie has been elected to that organization's board of directors.She recently received national recognition when she wasawarded the 1998 Nationwide Insurance Community Service Award for dedication to civic causes.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
Nearly 300 relatives, friends and co-workers filled First Evangelical Lutheran Church in Odenton yesterday to say goodbye to Betty Asplund, director of the Hospice of the Chesapeake's Bereavement Center, and a wife, mother and grandmother.The 51-year-old Millersville resident died Friday after a brief respiratory illness.Asplund was remembered as a woman strong in her Christian faith who always was willing to help others through the loss of a loved one.With the coffin draped in white cloth with red trim at the front of the sanctuary, the standing-room-only crowd cried and laughed a little as a longtime co-worker and friend and then Asplund's pastor remembered her life.
NEWS
December 8, 1996
Betty Asplund, 51, director of bereavement centerBetty Asplund, director of an Anne Arundel County bereavement center that has become an international model, died Friday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of a brief respiratory illness. She was 51 and a resident of Millersville.Born Betty Hurd in Baltimore, she was a graduate of Western High School and became a homemaker.In 1986, she began volunteering at the Hospice of the Chesapeake in Millersville, and, in 1990, became the director of its new bereavement center, which provides counseling to families.
NEWS
September 17, 1995
One Woman's Commitment to CompassionRecently, more than 120 community volunteers, co-workers, colleagues, family members and friends gathered to pay tribute to a woman who has made significant contribution of time, talent and caring to Anne Arundel County. They came together for an appreciation and recognition dinner honoring Betty Asplund, who is director of Hospice of the Chesapeake's Bereavement Center.Betty began as a volunteer with Hospice of the Chesapeake several years after losing her first husband to sudden death.
NEWS
By Jill L. Zarend and Jill L. Zarend,Staff writer | January 6, 1992
The Arundel Hospice has changed its name to reflect an expanded mission throughout the region. The 12-year-old Millersville organization began the new year as the Hospice of the Chesapeake, complete with a new logo featuring a lighthouse beacon shining over the bay."It'sreally an attempt to send a message," said Lars Egede-Nissen, president and chief executive officer."We are truly there whenever you may need us. It (the lighthouse)symbolizes the spirit of hospice care -- life-threatening illnesses is a terrible storm -- and when you are in that storm we can be a beacon."
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | August 5, 1993
On Aug. 22, 68 county children who have lost parents or siblings will stand by the Severn River in Millersville and let go.They will throw carnations -- one flower for each person, each loved memory -- into the river, write those names on a big, heart-shaped balloon and stand by the water's edge, waving goodbye as it floats away.Camp Nabe, a children's bereavement camp run by the Hospice of the Chesapeake, is about letting go -- learning how and when to say farewell to the dead, said Betty Asplund, director of the hospice's bereavement center.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE | September 15, 1994
A new season or holiday officially arrives at my house with the unfurling of a decorative flag -- last week it was the lowering of the summery blue and green magnolia banner and the raising of a more autumnal, cardinal red and gold design.The problem is that my hall closet is approaching overload, my banners changing as frequently as the phases of the moon.*Before we write the final chapter on the summer of 1994, here's what some of our kids were doing.* Fifty children and their adult "Big Buddies" spent an August weekend at Camp Nabe learning to cope with the death of aloved one.Sponsored by the Bereavement Center of Hospice of the Chesapeake, the camp meets annually at Arlington Echo Outdoor Educational Center in Millersville.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | August 5, 1993
On Aug. 22, 68 county children who have lost parents or siblings will stand by the Severn River in Millersville and let go.They will throw carnations -- one flower for each person, each loved memory -- into the river, write those names on a big, heart-shaped balloon and stand by the water's edge, waving goodbye as it floats away.Camp Nabe, a children's bereavement camp run by the Hospice of the Chesapeake, is about letting go -- learning how and when to say farewell to the dead, said Betty Asplund, director of the hospice's bereavement center.
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